• One of the most intriguing results from the gamma-ray instruments in orbit has been the detection of powerful flares from the Crab Nebula. These flares challenge our understanding of pulsar wind nebulae and models for particle acceleration. We report on the portion of a multiwavelength campaign using Keck, HST, and Chandra concentrating on a small emitting region, the Crab's inner knot, located a fraction of an arcsecond from the pulsar. We find that the knot's radial size, tangential size, peak flux, and the ratio of the flux to that of the pulsar are correlated with the projected distance of the knot from the pulsar. A new approach, using singular value decomposition for analyzing time series of images, was introduced yielding results consistent with the more traditional methods while some uncertainties were substantially reduced. We exploit the characterization of the knot to discuss constraints on standard shock-model parameters that may be inferred from our observations assuming the inner knot lies near to the shocked surface. These include inferences as to wind magnetization, shock shape parameters such as incident angle and poloidal radius of curvature, as well as the IR/optical emitting particle enthalpy fraction. We find that while the standard shock model gives good agreement with observation in many respects, there remain two puzzles: (a) The observed angular size of the knot relative to the pulsar--knot separation is much smaller than expected; (b) The variable, yet high degree of polarization reported is difficult to reconcile with a highly relativistic downstream flow.
  • We describe the AGILE gamma-ray astronomy satellite which has recently been selected as the first Small Scientific Mission of the Italian Space Agency. With a launch in 2002, AGILE will provide a unique tool for high-energy astrophysics in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV range before GLAST. Despite the much smaller weight and dimensions, the scientific performances of AGILE are comparable to those of EGRET.
  • The BeppoSAX satellite has recently opened a new way towards the solution of the long standing gamma-ray bursts' (GRBs) enigma, providing accurate coordinates few hours after the event thus allowing for multiwavelength follow-up observational campaigns. The BeppoSAX Narrow Field Instruments observed the region of sky containing GRB970111 16 hours after the burst. In contrast to other GRBs observed by BeppoSAX no bright afterglow was unambiguously observed. A faint source (1SAXJ1528.1+1937) is detected in a position consistent with the BeppoSAX Wide Field Camera position, but unconsistent with the IPN annulus. Whether 1SAXJ1528.1+1937 is associated with GRB970111 or not, the X-ray intensity of the afterglow is significantly lower than expected, based on the properties of the other BeppoSAX GRB afterglows. Given that GRB970111 is one of the brightest GRBs observed, this implies that there is no obvious relation between the GRB gamma-ray peak flux and the intensity of the X-ray afterglow.