• We investigate the variable star content of the isolated, Local Group, dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Cetus. Multi-epoch, wide-field images collected with the VLT/VIMOS camera allowed us to detect 638 variable stars (630 RR Lyrae stars and 8 Anomalous Cepheids), 475 of which are new detections. We present a full catalogue of periods, amplitudes, and mean magnitudes. Motivated by the recent discovery that the pulsational properties of the RR Lyrae stars in the Tucana dSph revealed the presence of a metallicity gradient within the oldest (>10 Gyr old) stellar populations, we investigated the possibility of an analogous effect in Cetus. We found that, despite the obvious radial gradient in the Horizontal Branch (HB) and Red Giant Branch (RGB) morphologies, both becoming bluer on average for increasing distance from the center of Cetus, the properties of the RR Lyrae stars are homogeneous within the investigated area (out to r~15'), with no significant evidence of a radial gradient. We discuss this in connection with the star formation history (SFH) previously derived for the two galaxies. The observed differences between these two systems show that even systems this small show a variety of early evolutionary histories. These differences could be due to different merger or accretion histories.
  • We present the first investigation of the Blue Straggler star (BSS) population in two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, Cetus and Tucana. Deep HST/ACS photometry allowed us to identify samples of 940 and 1214 candidates, respectively. The analysis of the star formation histories of the two galaxies suggests that both host a population of BSSs. Specifically, if the BSS candidates are interpreted as young main sequence stars, they do not conform to their galaxy's age-metallicity relationship. The analysis of the luminosity function and the radial distributions support this conclusion, and suggest a non-collisional mechanism for the BSS formation, from the evolution of primordial binaries. This scenario is also supported by the results of new dynamical simulations presented here. Both galaxies coincide with the relationship between the BSS frequency and the absolute visual magnitude Mv found by Momany et al (2007). If this relationship is confirmed by larger sample, then it could be a valuable tool to discriminate between the presence of BSSs and galaxies hosting truly young populations.
  • We present a detailed study of the star formation history (SFH) of the Tucana dwarf spheroidal galaxy. High quality, deep HST/ACS data, allowed us to obtain the deepest color-magnitude diagram to date, reaching the old main sequence turnoff (F814 ~ 29) with good photometric accuracy. Our analysis, based on three different SFH codes, shows that Tucana is an old and metal-poor stellar system, which experienced a strong initial burst of star formation at a very early epoch (~ 13 Gyr ago) which lasted a maximum of 1 Gyr (sigma value). We are not able to unambiguously answer the question of whether most star formation in Tucana occurred before or after the end of the reionization era, and we analyze alternative scenarios that may explain the transformation of Tucana from a gas-rich galaxy into a dSph. Current measurements of its radial velocity do not preclude that Tucana may have crossed the inner regions of the Local Group once, and so gas stripping by ram pressure and tides due to a close interaction cannot be ruled out. On the other hand, the high star formation rate measured at early times may have injected enough energy into the interstellar medium to blow out a significant fraction of the initial gas content. Gas that is heated but not blown out would also be more easily stripped via ram pressure. We compare the SFH inferred for Tucana with that of Cetus, the other isolated LG dSph galaxy in the LCID sample. We show that the formation time of the bulk of star formation in Cetus is clearly delayed with respect to that of Tucana. This reinforces the conclusion of Monelli et al. (2010) that Cetus formed the vast majority of its stars after the end of the reionization era implying, therefore, that small dwarf galaxies are not necessarily strongly affected by reionization, in agreement with many state-of-the-art cosmological models. [abridged]
  • We present a study of the variation of spatial structure of stellar populations within dwarf galaxies as a function of the population age. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging of nearby dwarf galaxies in order to resolve individual stars and create composite colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for each galaxy. Using the obtained CMDs, we select Blue Helium Burning stars (BHeBs), which can be unambiguously age-dated by comparing the absolute magnitude of individual stars with stellar isochrones. Additionally, we select a very young (<10 Myr) population of OB stars for a subset of the galaxies based on the tip of the young main-sequence. By selecting stars in different age ranges we can then study how the spatial distribution of these stars evolves with time. We find, in agreement with previous studies, that stars are born within galaxies with a high degree of substructure which is made up of a continuous distribution of clusters, groups and associations from parsec to hundreds of parsec scales. These structures disperse on timescales of tens to hundreds of Myr, which we quantify using the two-point correlation function and the Q-parameter developed by Cartwright & Whitworth (2004). On galactic scales, we can place lower limits on the time it takes to remove the original structure (i.e., structure survives for at least this long), tevo, which varies between ~100~Myr (NGC~2366) and ~350 Myr (DDO~165). This is similar to what we have found previously for the SMC (~80~Myr) and the LMC (~175 Myr). We do not find any strong correlations between tevo and the luminosity of the host galaxy.
  • We use deep HST/ACS observations to calculate the star formation history (SFH) of the Cetus dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy. Our photometry reaches below the oldest main sequence turn-offs, which allows us to estimate the age and duration of the main episode of star formation in Cetus. This is well approximated by a single episode that peaked roughly 12+/-0.5 Gyr ago and lasted no longer than about 1.9+/-0.5 Gyr (FWHM). Our solution also suggests that essentially no stars formed in Cetus during the past 8 Gyrs. This makes Cetus' SFH comparable to that of the oldest Milky Way dSphs. Given the current isolation of Cetus in the outer fringes of the Local Group, this implies that Cetus is a clear outlier in the morphology-Galactocentric distance relation that holds for the majority of Milky Way dwarf satellites. Our results also show that Cetus continued forming stars through z ~ 1, long after the Universe was reionized, and that there is no clear signature of the epoch of reionization in Cetus' SFH. We discuss briefly the implications of these results for dwarf galaxy evolution models. Finally, we present a comprehensive account of the data reduction and analysis strategy adopted for all galaxies targeted by the LCID (Local Cosmology from Isolated Dwarfs) project. We employ two different photometry codes (DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME and DOLPHOT), three different SFH reconstruction codes (IAC-pop/MinnIAC, MATCH, COLE), and two stellar evolution libraries (BaSTI and Padova/Girardi), allowing for a detailed assessment of the modeling and observational uncertainties.
  • The survey description and the near-, mid-, and far-infrared flux properties are presented for the 258 galaxies in the Local Volume Legacy (LVL). LVL is a Spitzer Space Telescope legacy program that surveys the local universe out to 11 Mpc, built upon a foundation of ultraviolet, H-alpha, and HST imaging from 11HUGS (11 Mpc H-alpha and Ultraviolet Galaxy Survey) and ANGST (ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury). LVL covers an unbiased, representative, and statistically robust sample of nearby star-forming galaxies, exploiting the highest extragalactic spatial resolution achievable with Spitzer. As a result of its approximately volume-limited nature, LVL augments previous Spitzer observations of present-day galaxies with improved sampling of the low-luminosity galaxy population. The collection of LVL galaxies shows a large spread in mid-infrared colors, likely due to the conspicuous deficiency of 8um PAH emission from low-metallicity, low-luminosity galaxies. Conversely, the far-infrared emission tightly tracks the total infrared emission, with a dispersion in their flux ratio of only 0.1 dex. In terms of the relation between infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio and ultraviolet spectral slope, the LVL sample shows redder colors and/or lower infrared-to-ultraviolet ratios than starburst galaxies, suggesting that reprocessing by dust is less important in the lower mass systems that dominate the LVL sample. Comparisons with theoretical models suggest that the amplitude of deviations from the relation found for starburst galaxies correlates with the age of the stellar populations that dominate the ultraviolet/optical luminosities.
  • We report the findings of a new search for RR Lyraes in an M31 halo field located 40 arcminutes from the nucleus of the galaxy along the minor axis. We detected 37 variable stars, of which 24 are classified as RR Lyraes and the others are ambiguous. Estimating a completeness fraction of ~24%, we calculate that there are approximately 100 RR Lyraes in the field, which is consistent with what is expected from deep HST color-magnitude diagrams. We calculate a mean magnitude of g=25.15+/ 0.03, which we interpret to mean that the mean metallicity of RR Lyraes is significantly lower than that of the M31 halo as a whole. The presence of ancient, metal-poor stars opens the possibility that, initially, the M31 halo appeared much like the Milky Way halo.
  • We present maps of the first-ranked HII region complex Hubble V in the metal-poor Local Group dwarf galaxy NGC 6822 in the first four transitions of CO, the 158 micron transition of C+, the 21-cm line of HI, the Pa-beta line of HII, and the continuum at 21 cm and 2.2 micron wavelengths. We have also determined various integrated intensities, notably of HCO+ and near-IR H2 emission. Although Hubble X is located in a region of relatively strong HI emission, our mapping failed to reveal any significant CO emission from it. The relatively small CO cloud complex associated with Hubble V is comparable in size to the ionized HII region. The CO clouds are hot (Tkin) = 150 K) and have high molecular gas densities (n(H2) = 10**4 cm**-3) Molecular hydrogen probably extends well beyond the CO boundaries. C+ column densities are more than an order of magnitude higher than those of CO. The total mass of the complex is about 10**6 M(sun) and molecular gas account for more than half of this. The complex is excited by luminous stars reddened or obscured at visual, but apparent at near-infrared wavelengths. The total embedded stellar mass may account for about 10% of the total mass, and the mass of ionized gas for half of that. Hubble V illustrates that modest star formation efficiencies may be associated with high CO destruction efficiencies in low-metallicity objects. The analysis of the Hubble V photon-dominated region (PDR) confirms in an independent manner the high value of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor X found earlier, characteristic of starforming low-metallicity regions.
  • We have measured stellar photometry from deep Cycle 7 Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 imaging of the dwarf irregular galaxy Sextans A. The imaging was taken in three filters: F555W ($V$; 8 orbits), F814W ($I$; 16 orbits), and F656N (H$\alpha$; 1 orbit). Combining these data with Cycle 5 WFPC2 observations provides nearly complete coverage of the optically visible portion of the galaxy. The Cycle 7 observations are nearly 2 magnitudes more sensitive than the Cycle 5 observations, which provides unambiguous separation of the faint blue helium burning stars (BHeB stars) from contaminant populations. The depth of the photometry allows us to compare recent star formation histories recovered from both the main sequence (MS) stars and the BHeB stars for the last 300 Myr. The excellent agreement between these independent star formation rate (SFR) calculations is a resounding confirmation for the legitimacy of using the BHeB stars to calculate the recent SFR. Using the BHeB stars we have calculated the global star formation history over the past 700 Myr. The history calculated from the Cycle 7 data is remarkably identical to that calculated from the Cycle 5 data, implying that both halves of the galaxy formed stars in concert. We have also calculated the spatially resolved star formation history, combining the fields from the Cycle 5 and Cycle 7 data. Our interpretation of the pattern of star formation is that it is an orderly stochastic process.
  • We have obtained the first high resolution spectra of individual stars in the dwarf irregular galaxy, NGC 6822. The spectra of the two A-type supergiants were obtained at the VLT and Keck Observatories, using UVES and HIRES, respectively. A detailed model atmospheres analysis has been used to determine their atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances. The mean iron abundance from these two stars is $<$[Fe/H]$>=-$0.49 $\pm$0.22 ({\it $\pm$0.21}, with Cr yielding a similar underabundance, $<$[Cr/H]$>=-$0.50 $\pm$0.20 ({\it $\pm$0.16}). This confirms that NGC 6822 has a metallicity that is slightly higher than that of the SMC, and is the first determination of the present-day iron-group abundances in NGC 6822. The mean stellar oxygen abundance, 12+log(O/H)=8.36 $\pm$0.19 ({\it $\pm$0.21}),is in good agreement with the nebular oxygen results. Oxygen has the same underabundance as iron, $<$[O/Fe]$>$=+0.02 $\pm$0.20 ({\it $\pm$0.21}). This O/Fe ratio is very similar to that seen in the Magellanic Clouds, which supports the picture that chemical evolution occurs more slowly in these lower mass galaxies, although the O/Fe ratio is also consistent with that observed in comparatively metal-poor stars in the Galactic disk. Combining all of the available abundance observations for NGC 6822 shows that there is no trend in abundance with galactocentric distance. However, a subset of the highest quality data are consistent with a radial abundance gradient.
  • The unprecedented detail of the WFPC2 colour-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar population of Leo A presented here allows us to determine a new distance and an accurate star formation history for this extremely metal-poor Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy. From the position of the red clump, the helium-burning blue loops and the tip of the red giant branch, we obtain a distance modulus, m-M=24.2+/-0.2, or 690 +/- 60 kpc, which places Leo A firmly within the Local Group. Our interpretation of these features in the WFPC2 CMDs at this new distance based upon extremely low metallicity (Z=0.0004) theoretical stellar evolution models suggests that this galaxy is predominantly young, i.e. <2 Gyr old. A major episode of star formation 900 - 1500 Gyr ago can explain the red clump luminosity and also fits in with our interpretation of the number of anomalous Cepheid variable stars seen in this galaxy. We cannot rule out the presence of an older, underlying globular cluster age stellar population with these data. However, using the currently available stellar evolution models, it would appear that such an older population is limited to no more than 10% of the total star formation to have occured in this galaxy. Leo A provides a nearby laboratory for studying young metal poor stars and investigations of metal-poor galaxy evolution, such as is supposed to occur for larger systems at intermediate and high redshifts.