• We present the results from a study of the morphologies of moderate luminosity X-ray selected AGN host galaxies in comparison to a carefully mass-matched control sample at 0.5 < z < 3 in the CANDELS GOODS-S field. We apply a multi-wavelength morphological decomposition analysis to these two samples and report on the differences between the morphologies as fitted from single Sersic and multiple Sersic models, and models which include an additional nuclear point-source component. Thus, we are able to compare the widely adopted single Sersic fits from previous studies to the results from a full morphological decomposition, and address the issue of how biased the inferred properties of AGN hosts are by a potential nuclear contribution from the AGN itself. We find that the AGN hosts are mixed systems which have higher bulge fractions than the control sample in our highest redshift bins at the >99.7% confidence level, according to all model fits even those which adopt a point-source component. This serves to alleviate concerns that previous, purely single Sersic, analyses of AGN hosts could have been spuriously biased towards higher bulge fractions. This dataset allows us to further probe the physical nature of these point-source components; we find no strong correlation between the point-source component and AGN activity, and that these point-source components are best modelled physically by nuclear starbursts. Our analysis of the bulge and disk fractions of these AGN hosts in comparison to a mass-matched control sample reveals a similar morphological evolutionary track for both the active and non-active populations, providing further evidence in favour of a model where AGN activity is triggered by secular processes.
  • Spectroscopic + photometric redshifts, stellar mass estimates, and rest-frame colors from the 3D-HST survey are combined with structural parameter measurements from CANDELS imaging to determine the galaxy size-mass distribution over the redshift range 0<z<3. Separating early- and late-type galaxies on the basis of star-formation activity, we confirm that early-type galaxies are on average smaller than late-type galaxies at all redshifts, and find a significantly different rate of average size evolution at fixed galaxy mass, with fast evolution for the early-type population, R_eff ~ (1+z)^-1.48, and moderate evolution for the late-type population, R_eff ~ (1+z)^-0.75. The large sample size and dynamic range in both galaxy mass and redshift, in combination with the high fidelity of our measurements due to the extensive use of spectroscopic data, not only fortify previous results, but also enable us to probe beyond simple average galaxy size measurements. At all redshifts the slope of the size-mass relation is shallow, R_eff ~ M_star^0.22, for late-type galaxies with stellar mass >3x10^9 M_sol, and steep, R_eff M_star^0.75, for early-type galaxies with stellar mass >2x10^10 M_sol. The intrinsic scatter is <~0.2 dex for all galaxy types and redshifts. For late-type galaxies, the logarithmic size distribution is not symmetric, but skewed toward small sizes: at all redshifts and masses a tail of small late-type galaxies exists that overlaps in size with the early-type galaxy population. The number density of massive (~10^11 M_sol), compact (R_eff < 2 kpc) early-type galaxies increases from z=3 to z=1.5-2 and then strongly decreases at later cosmic times.
  • We have constructed a mass-selected sample of Mstar>10^11Msolar galaxies at 1<z<3 in the CANDELS UDS and COSMOS fields and have decomposed these systems into their separate bulge and disk components according to their H(160)-band morphologies. By extending this analysis to multiple bands we have been able to conduct individual bulge and disk component SED fitting which has provided us with stellar-mass and star-formation rate estimates for the separate bulge and disk components. These have been combined with size measurements to explore the evolution of these massive high-redshift galaxies. By utilising the new decomposed stellar-mass estimates, we confirm that the bulge components display a stronger size evolution than the disks. This can be seen from both the fraction of bulge components which lie below the local relation and the median sizes of the bulge components, where the bulges are a median factor of 2.93+/-0.32 times smaller than similarly massive local galaxies at 1<z<2 and 3.41+/-0.58 smaller at 2<z<3; for the disks the corresponding factors are 1.65+/-0.14 and 1.99+/-0.25. Moreover, by splitting our sample into the passive and star-forming bulge and disk sub-populations and examining their sizes as a fraction of their present-day counter-parts, we find that the star-forming and passive bulges are equally compact, star-forming disks are larger, while the passive disks have intermediate sizes. This trend is not evident when classifying galaxy morphology on the basis of single-Sersic fits and adopting the overall star-formation rates. Finally, by evolving the star-formation histories of the passive disks back to the redshifts when the passive disks were last active, we show that the passive and star-forming disks have consistent sizes at the relevant epoch. These trends need to be reproduced by any mechanisms which attempt to explain the morphological evolution of galaxies.
  • We present the results of a new and improved study of the morphological and spectral evolution of massive galaxies over the redshift range 1<z<3. Our analysis is based on a bulge-disk decomposition of 396 galaxies with Mstar>10^11 Msolar from the CANDELS WFC3/IR imaging within the COSMOS and UKIDSS UDS survey fields. We find that, by modelling the H(160) image of each galaxy with a combination of a de Vaucouleurs bulge (Sersic index n=4) and an exponential disk (n=1), we can then lock all derived morphological parameters for the bulge and disk components, and successfully reproduce the shorter-wavelength J(125), i(814), v(606) HST images simply by floating the magnitudes of the two components. This then yields sub-divided 4-band HST photometry for the bulge and disk components which, with no additional priors, is well described by spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution. Armed with this information we are able to properly determine the masses and star-formation rates for the bulge and disk components, and find that: i) from z=3 to z=1 the galaxies move from disk-dominated to increasingly bulge-dominated, but very few galaxies are pure bulges/ellipticals by z=1; ii) while most passive galaxies are bulge-dominated, and most star-forming galaxies disk-dominated, 18+/-5% of passive galaxies are disk-dominated, and 11+/-3% of star-forming galaxies are bulge-dominated, a result which needs to be explained by any model purporting to connect star-formation quenching with morphological transformations; iii) there exists a small but significant population of pure passive disks, which are generally flatter than their star-forming counterparts (whose axial ratio distribution peaks at b/a~0.7); iv) flatter/larger disks re-emerge at the highest star-formation rates, consistent with recent studies of sub-mm galaxies, and with the concept of a maximum surface-density for star-formation activity.
  • We present global structural parameter measurements of 109,533 unique, H_F160W-selected objects from the CANDELS multi-cycle treasury program. Sersic model fits for these objects are produced with GALFIT in all available near-infrared filters (H_F160W, J_F125W and, for a subset, Y_F105W). The parameters of the best-fitting Sersic models (total magnitude, half-light radius, Sersic index, axis ratio, and position angle) are made public, along with newly constructed point spread functions for each field and filter. Random uncertainties in the measured parameters are estimated for each individual object based on a comparison between multiple, independent measurements of the same set of objects. To quantify systematic uncertainties we create a mosaic with simulated galaxy images with a realistic distribution of input parameters and then process and analyze the mosaic in an identical manner as the real data. We find that accurate and precise measurements -- to 10% or better -- of all structural parameters can typically be obtained for galaxies with H_F160W < 23, with comparable fidelity for basic size and shape measurements for galaxies to H_F160W ~ 24.5.
  • We have used high-resolution, HST WFC3/IR, near-infrared imaging to conduct a detailed bulge-disk decomposition of the morphologies of ~200 of the most massive (M_star > 10^11 M_solar) galaxies at 1<z<3 in the CANDELS-UDS field. We find that, while such massive galaxies at low redshift are generally bulge-dominated, at redshifts 1<z<2 they are predominantly mixed bulge+disk systems, and by z>2 they are mostly disk-dominated. Interestingly, we find that while most of the quiescent galaxies are bulge-dominated, a significant fraction (25-40%) of the most quiescent galaxies, have disk-dominated morphologies. Thus, our results suggest that the physical mechanisms which quench star-formation activity are not simply connected to those responsible for the morphological transformation of massive galaxies.
  • We have used deep, HST, near-IR imaging to study the morphological properties of the most massive galaxies at high z, modelling the WFC3/IR H-band images of the ~200 galaxies in the CANDELS-UDS field with 1 < z_phot < 3, and stellar masses M_star > 10^11 M_sun. We have used both single-Sersic and bulge+disk models, have investigated the errors/biases introduced by uncertainties in the background and the PSF, and have obtained formally-acceptable model fits to >90% of the galaxies. Our results indicate that these massive galaxies at 1 < z < 3 lie both on and below the local size-mass relation, with a median R_e~2.6 kpc, a factor of ~2.3 smaller than comparably-massive local galaxies. Moreover, we find that bulge-dominated objects in particular show evidence for a growing bimodality in the size-mass relation with increasing z, and by z > 2 the compact bulges display effective radii a factor ~4 smaller than local ellipticals of comparable mass. These trends appear to extend to the bulge components of disk-dominated galaxies, and vice versa. We also find that, while such massive galaxies at low z are bulge-dominated, at 1 < z < 2 they are predominantly mixed bulge+disk systems, and by z > 2 they are mostly disk-dominated. The majority of the disk-dominated galaxies are actively forming stars, but this is also true for many of the bulge-dominated systems. Interestingly, however, while most of the quiescent galaxies are bulge-dominated, we find that a significant fraction (25-40%) of the most quiescent galaxies have disk-dominated morphologies. Thus, while our results show that the massive galaxy population is undergoing dramatic changes at this crucial epoch, they also suggest that the physical mechanisms which quench star-formation activity are not simply connected to those responsible for the morphological transformation of massive galaxies into present-day giant ellipticals.
  • New optical and radio data on the BL Lacertae object AO 0235+16 have been collected in the last four years by a wide international collaboration, which confirm the intense activity of this source. The optical data also include the results of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) first-light campaign organized in November 1997. The optical spectrum is observed to basically steepen when the source gets fainter. We have investigated the existence of typical variability time scales and of possible correlations between the optical and radio emissions by means of visual inspection, Discrete Correlation Function analysis, and Discrete Fourier Transform technique. The major radio outbursts are found to repeat quasi-regularly with a periodicity of about 5.7 years; this period is also in agreement with the occurrence of some of the major optical outbursts, but not all of them.