• Many radio galaxies show the presence of dense and dusty gas near the active nucleus. This can be traced by both 21cm HI absorption and soft X-ray absorption, offering new insight into the physical nature of the circumnuclear medium of these distant galaxies. To better understand this relationship, we investigate soft X-ray absorption as an indicator for the detection of associated HI absorption, as part of preparation for the First Large Absorption Survey in HI (FLASH) to be undertaken with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). We present the results of our pilot study using the Boolardy Engineering Test Array, a precursor to ASKAP, to search for new absorption detections in radio sources brighter than 1 Jy that also feature soft X-ray absorption. Based on this pilot survey, we detected HI absorption towards the radio source PKS 1657-298 at a redshift of z = 0.42. This source also features the highest X-ray absorption ratio of our pilot sample by a factor of 3, which is consistent with our general findings that X-ray absorption predicates the presence of dense neutral gas. By comparing the X-ray properties of AGN with and without detection of HI absorption at radio wavelengths, we find that X-ray hardness ratio and HI absorption optical depth are correlated at a statistical significance of 4.71{\sigma}. We conclude by considering the impact of these findings on future radio and X-ray absorption studies.
  • Low radio frequency surveys are important for testing unified models of radio-loud quasars and radio galaxies. Intrinsically similar sources that are randomly oriented on the sky will have different projected linear sizes. Measuring the projected linear sizes of these sources provides an indication of their orientation. Steep-spectrum isotropic radio emission allows for orientation-free sample selection at low radio frequencies. We use a new radio survey of the Bo\"otes field at 150 MHz made with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) to select a sample of radio sources. We identify 44 radio galaxies and 16 quasars with powers $P>10^{25.5}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ at 150 MHz using cross-matched multi-wavelength information from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES), which provides spectroscopic redshifts. We find that LOFAR-detected radio sources with steep spectra have projected linear sizes that are on average 4.4$\pm$1.4 larger than those with flat spectra. The projected linear sizes of radio galaxies are on average 3.1$\pm$1.0 larger than those of quasars (2.0$\pm$0.3 after correcting for redshift evolution). Combining these results with three previous surveys, we find that the projected linear sizes of radio galaxies and quasars depend on redshift but not on power. The projected linear size ratio does not correlate with either parameter. The LOFAR data is consistent within the uncertainties with theoretical predictions of the correlation between the quasar fraction and linear size ratio, based on an orientation-based unification scheme.
  • Millisecond radio pulsars acquire their rapid rotation rates through mass and angular momentum transfer in a low-mass X-ray binary system. Recent studies of PSR J1824-2452I and PSR J1023+0038 have observationally demonstrated this link, and they have also shown that such systems can repeatedly transition back-and-forth between the radio millisecond pulsar and low-mass X-ray binary states. This also suggests that a fraction of such systems are not newly born radio millisecond pulsars but are rather suspended in a back-and-forth state switching phase, perhaps for giga-years. XSS J12270-4859 has been previously suggested to be a low-mass X-ray binary, and until recently the only such system to be seen at MeV-GeV energies. We present radio, optical and X-ray observations that offer compelling evidence that XSS J12270-4859 is a low-mass X-ray binary which transitioned to a radio millisecond pulsar state between 2012 November 14 and 2012 December 21. Though radio pulsations remain to be detected, we use optical and X-ray photometry/spectroscopy to show that the system has undergone a sudden dimming and no longer shows evidence for an accretion disk. The optical observations constrain the orbital period to 6.913+-0.002 hr.
  • Here we describe the Compact Array Broadband Backend (CABB) and present first results obtained with the upgraded Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The 16-fold increase in observing bandwidth, from 2 x 128 MHz to 2 x 2048 MHz, high bit sampling, and addition of 16 zoom windows (each divided into a further 2048 channels) provide major improvements for all ATCA observations. The benefits of the new system are: (1) hugely increased radio continuum and polarization sensitivity as well as image fidelity, (2) substantially improved capability to search for and map emission and absorption lines over large velocity ranges, (3) simultaneous multi-line and continuum observations, (4) increased sensitivity, survey speed and dynamic range due to high-bit sampling, and (5) high velocity resolution, while maintaining full polarization output. The new CABB system encourages all observers to make use of both spectral line and continuum data to achieve their full potential. Given the dramatic increase of the ATCA capabilities in all bands (ranging from 1.1 to 105 GHz) CABB enables scientific projects that were not feasible before the upgrade, such as simultaneous observations of multiple spectral lines, on-the-fly mapping, fast follow-up of radio transients (e.g., the radio afterglow of new supernovae) and maser observations at high velocity resolution and full polarization. The first science results presented here include wide-band spectra, high dynamic-range images, and polarization measurements, highlighting the increased capability and discovery potential of the ATCA.