• We describe data release 3 (DR3) of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA survey is a spectroscopic redshift and multi-wavelength photometric survey in three equatorial regions each of 60.0 deg^2 (G09, G12, G15), and two southern regions of 55.7 deg^2 (G02) and 50.6 deg^2 (G23). DR3 consists of: the first release of data covering the G02 region and of data on H-ATLAS sources in the equatorial regions; and updates to data on sources released in DR2. DR3 includes 154809 sources with secure redshifts across four regions. A subset of the G02 region is 95.5% redshift complete to r<19.8 over an area of 19.5 deg^2, with 20086 galaxy redshifts, that overlaps substantially with the XXL survey (X-ray) and VIPERS (redshift survey). In the equatorial regions, the main survey has even higher completeness (98.5%), and spectra for about 75% of H-ATLAS filler targets were also obtained. This filler sample extends spectroscopic redshifts, for probable optical counterparts to H-ATLAS sub-mm sources, to 0.8 mag deeper (r<20.6) than the GAMA main survey. There are 25814 galaxy redshifts for H-ATLAS sources from the GAMA main or filler surveys. GAMA DR3 is available at the survey website (www.gama-survey.org/dr3/).
  • The galaxy pairwise velocity dispersion (PVD) can provide important tests of non-standard gravity and galaxy formation models. We describe measurements of the PVD of galaxies in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey as a function of projected separation and galaxy luminosity. Due to the faint magnitude limit ($r < 19.8$) and highly-complete spectroscopic sampling of the GAMA survey, we are able to reliably measure the PVD to smaller scales ($r_\bot = 0.01$ Mpc/h) than previous work. The measured PVD at projected separations $r_\bot <~ 1$ Mpc/h increases near-monotonically with increasing luminosity from $\sigma \approx 200$ km/s at $M_r = -17$ mag to $\sigma \approx 600$ km/s at $M_r \approx -22$ mag. Analysis of the Gonzalez-Perez (2014) GALFORM semi-analytic model yields no such trend of PVD with luminosity: the model over-predicts the PVD for faint galaxies. This is most likely a result of the model placing too many low-luminosity galaxies in massive halos.
  • We present an analysis of the mid-infrared WISE sources seen within the equatorial GAMA G12 field, located in the North Galactic Cap. Our motivation is to study and characterize the behavior of WISE source populations in anticipation of the deep multi-wavelength surveys that will define the next decade, with the principal science goal of mapping the 3D large scale structures and determining the global physical attributes of the host galaxies. In combination with cosmological redshifts, we identify galaxies from their WISE W1 3.4um resolved emission, and by performing a star-galaxy separation using apparent magnitude, colors and statistical modeling of star-counts. The resultant galaxy catalog has ~590,000 sources in 60 deg^2, reaching a W1 5-sigma depth of 31 uJy. At the faint end, where redshifts are not available, we employ a luminosity function analysis to show that approximately 27% of all WISE extragalactic sources to a limit of 17.5 mag (31 uJy) are at high redshift, z > 1. The spatial distribution is investigated using two-point correlation functions and a 3D source density characterization at 5 Mpc and 20 Mpc scales. For angular distributions, we find brighter and more massive sources are strongly clustered relative to fainter and lower mass source; likewise, based on WISE colors, spheroidal galaxies have the strongest clustering, while late-type disk galaxies have the lowest clustering amplitudes. Along the radial direction, the strongest clustering is in the largest redshift shell, while the weakest is in the nearest redshift shell, consistent with the stellar mass and morphological type dependency results. In three dimensions, we find a number of distinct groupings, often bridged by filaments and super-structures. Using special visualization tools, we map these structures, exploring how clustering may play a role with stellar mass and galaxy type.
  • Abridged - We quantify the effect of the galaxy group environment (for 12.5 < log(M_group/Msun) < 14.0) on the star formation rates of the (morphologically-selected) population of disk-dominated local Universe spiral galaxies (z < 0.13) with stellar masses log(M*/Msun) > 9.5. Within this population, we find that, while a small minority of group satellites are strongly quenched, the group centrals, and the large majority of satellites exhibit levels of SFR indistinguishable from ungrouped "field" galaxies of the same M*, albeit with a higher scatter, and for all M*. Modelling these results, we deduce that disk-dominated satellites continue to be characterized by a rapid cycling of gas into and out of their ISM at rates similar to those operating prior to infall, with the on-going fuelling likely sourced from the group intrahalo medium (IHM) on Mpc scales, rather than from the circum-galactic medium on 100kpc scales. Consequently, the color-density relation of the galaxy population as a whole would appear to be primarily due to a change in the mix of disk- and spheroid-dominated morphologies in the denser group environment compared to the field, rather than to a reduced propensity of the IHM in higher mass structures to cool and accrete onto galaxies. We also suggest that the inferred substantial accretion of IHM gas by satellite disk-dominated galaxies will lead to a progressive reduction in their specific angular momentum, thereby representing an efficient secular mechanism to transform morphology from star-forming disk-dominated types to more passive spheroid-dominated types.
  • We cross-match the two currently largest all-sky photometric catalogs, mid-infrared WISE and SuperCOSMOS scans of UKST/POSS-II photographic plates, to obtain a new galaxy sample that covers 3pi steradians. In order to characterize and purify the extragalactic dataset, we use external GAMA and SDSS spectroscopic information to define quasar and star loci in multicolor space, aiding the removal of contamination from our extended-source catalog. After appropriate data cleaning we obtain a deep wide-angle galaxy sample that is approximately 95% pure and 90% complete at high Galactic latitudes. The catalog contains close to 20 million galaxies over almost 70% of the sky, outside the Zone of Avoidance and other confused regions, with a mean surface density of over 650 sources per square degree. Using multiwavelength information from two optical and two mid-IR photometric bands, we derive photometric redshifts for all the galaxies in the catalog, using the ANNz framework trained on the final GAMA-II spectroscopic data. Our sample has a median redshift of z_{med} = 0.2 but with a broad dN/dz reaching up to z>0.4. The photometric redshifts have a mean bias of |delta_z|~10^{-3}, normalized scatter of sigma_z = 0.033 and less than 3% outliers beyond 3sigma_z. Comparison with external datasets shows no significant variation of photo-z quality with sky position. Together with the overall statistics, we also provide a more detailed analysis of photometric redshift accuracy as a function of magnitudes and colors. The final catalog is appropriate for `all-sky' 3D cosmology to unprecedented depths, in particular through cross-correlations with other large-area surveys. It should also be useful for source pre-selection and identification in forthcoming surveys such as TAIPAN or WALLABY.
  • We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalisation, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric dataset from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the datasets. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR dataset. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.
  • We combine Herschel/SPIRE sub-millimeter (submm) observations with existing multi-wavelength data to investigate the characteristics of low redshift, optically red galaxies detected in submm bands. We select a sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.01$\leq$z$\leq$0.2, having >5$\sigma$ detections in the SPIRE 250 micron submm waveband. Sources are then divided into two sub-samples of $red$ and $blue$ galaxies, based on their UV-optical colours. Galaxies in the $red$ sample account for $\approx$4.2 per cent of the total number of sources with stellar masses M$_{*}\gtrsim$10$^{10}$ Solar-mass. Following visual classification of the $red$ galaxies, we find that $\gtrsim$30 per cent of them are early-type galaxies and $\gtrsim$40 per cent are spirals. The colour of the $red$-spiral galaxies could be the result of their highly inclined orientation and/or a strong contribution of the old stellar population. It is found that irrespective of their morphological types, $red$ and $blue$ sources occupy environments with more or less similar densities (i.e., the $\Sigma_5$ parameter). From the analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies in our samples based on MAGPHYS, we find that galaxies in the $red$ sample (of any morphological type) have dust masses similar to those in the $blue$ sample (i.e. normal spiral/star-forming systems). However, in comparison to the $red$-spirals and in particular $blue$ systems, $red$-ellipticals have lower mean dust-to-stellar mass ratios. Besides galaxies in the $red$-elliptical sample have much lower mean star-formation/specific-star-formation rates in contrast to their counterparts in the $blue$ sample. Our results support a scenario where dust in early-type systems is likely to be of an external origin.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey furnishes a deep redshift catalog that, when combined with the Wide-field Infrared Explorer ($WISE$), allows us to explore for the first time the mid-infrared properties of $> 110, 000$ galaxies over 120 deg$^2$ to $z\simeq 0.5$. In this paper we detail the procedure for producing the matched GAMA-$WISE$ catalog for the G12 and G15 fields, in particular characterising and measuring resolved sources; the complete catalogs for all three GAMA equatorial fields will be made available through the GAMA public releases. The wealth of multiwavelength photometry and optical spectroscopy allows us to explore empirical relations between optically determined stellar mass (derived from synthetic stellar population models) and 3.4micron and 4.6micron WISE measurements. Similarly dust-corrected Halpha-derived star formation rates can be compared to 12micron and 22micron luminosities to quantify correlations that can be applied to large samples to $z<0.5$. To illustrate the applications of these relations, we use the 12micron star formation prescription to investigate the behavior of specific star formation within the GAMA-WISE sample and underscore the ability of WISE to detect star-forming systems at $z\sim0.5$. Within galaxy groups (determined by a sophisticated friends-of-friends scheme), results suggest that galaxies with a neighbor within 100$\,h^{-1} $kpc have, on average, lower specific star formation rates than typical GAMA galaxies with the same stellar mass.
  • We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, \tau^f_B, and the stellar mass surface density, \mu_{*}, of nearby (z < 0.13) spiral galaxies: log(\tau^f_B) = 1.12(+-0.11)log(\mu_{*}/M_sol kpc^2)-8.6(+-0.8). This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey and detected in the FIR/submm in the Herschel-ATLAS survey. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to \mu_{*} we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and S'ersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships between stellar mass, metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the \tau^f_B-\mu_{*} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the ISM. We use the \tau^f_B-\mu_{*} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu & Tuffs (2011) to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (sSFR), stellar mass, and \mu_{*}, in which the attenuation of the UV light used to measure the SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which is demonstrably due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar radiation field.
  • In this work we investigate in detail the effects local environment (groups and pairs) has on galaxies with stellar mass similar to the Milky-Way (L* galaxies). A volume limited sample of 6,150 galaxies is classified to determine emission features, morphological type and presence of a disk. This sample allows for characteristics of galaxies to be isolated (e.g. stellar mass and group halo mass), and their codependencies determined. We observe that galaxy-galaxy interactions play the most important role in shaping the evolution within a group halo, the main role of halo mass is in gathering the galaxies together to encourage such interactions. Dominant pair galaxies find their overall star formation enhanced when the pair's mass ratio is close to 1, otherwise we observe the same galaxies as we would in an unpaired system. The minor galaxy in a pair is greatly affected by its companion galaxy, and whilst the star forming fraction is always suppressed relative to equivalent stellar mass unpaired galaxies, it becomes lower still when the mass ratio of a pair system increases. We find that, in general, the close galaxy-galaxy interaction rate drops as a function of halo mass for a given amount of stellar mass. We find evidence of a local peak of interactions for Milky-Way stellar mass galaxies in Milky-Way halo mass groups. Low mass halos, and in particular Local Group mass halos, are an important environment for understanding the typical evolutionary path of a unit of stellar mass. We find compelling evidence for galaxy conformity in both groups and pairs, where morphological type conformity is dominant in groups, and emission class conformity is dominant in pairs. This suggests that group scale conformity is the result of many galaxy encounters over an extended period of time, whilst pair conformity is a fairly instantaneous response to a transitory interaction.
  • We investigate the properties of satellite galaxies that surround isolated hosts within the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.15, using data taken as part of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. Making use of isolation and satellite criteria that take into account stellar mass estimates, we find 3514 isolated galaxies of which 1426 host a total of 2998 satellites. Separating the red and blue populations of satellites and hosts, using colour-mass diagrams, we investigate the radial distribution of satellite galaxies and determine how the red fraction of satellites varies as a function of satellite mass, host mass and the projected distance from their host. Comparing the red fraction of satellites to a control sample of small neighbours at greater projected radii, we show that the increase in red fraction is primarily a function of host mass. The satellite red fraction is about 0.2 higher than the control sample for hosts with 11.0 < log M_* < 11.5, while the red fractions show no difference for hosts with 10.0 < log M_* < 10.5. For the satellites of more massive hosts the red fraction also increases as a function of decreasing projected distance. Our results suggest that the likely main mechanism for the quenching of star formation in satellites hosted by isolated galaxies is strangulation.
  • Using the complete GAMA-I survey covering ~142 sq. deg. to r=19.4, of which ~47 sq. deg. is to r=19.8, we create the GAMA-I galaxy group catalogue (G3Cv1), generated using a friends-of-friends (FoF) based grouping algorithm. Our algorithm has been tested extensively on one family of mock GAMA lightcones, constructed from Lambda-CDM N-body simulations populated with semi-analytic galaxies. Recovered group properties are robust to the effects of interlopers and are median unbiased in the most important respects. G3Cv1 contains 14,388 galaxy groups (with multiplicity >= 2$), including 44,186 galaxies out of a possible 110,192 galaxies, implying ~40% of all galaxies are assigned to a group. The similarities of the mock group catalogues and G3Cv1 are multiple: global characteristics are in general well recovered. However, we do find a noticeable deficit in the number of high multiplicity groups in GAMA compared to the mocks. Additionally, despite exceptionally good local spatial completeness, G3Cv1 contains significantly fewer compact groups with 5 or more members, this effect becoming most evident for high multiplicity systems. These two differences are most likely due to limitations in the physics included of the current GAMA lightcone mock. Further studies using a variety of galaxy formation models are required to confirm their exact origin.