• We report observations and analysis of the nearby gamma-ray burst GRB\,161219B (redshift $z=0.1475$) and the associated Type Ic supernova (SN) 2016jca. GRB\,161219B had an isotropic gamma-ray energy of $\sim 1.6 \times 10^{50}$\,erg. Its afterglow is likely refreshed at an epoch preceding the first photometric points (0.6\,d), which slows down the decay rates. Combined analysis of the SN light curve and multiwavelength observations of the afterglow suggest that the GRB jet was broad during the afterglow phase (full opening angle $\sim 42^\circ \pm 3^\circ$). Our spectral series shows broad absorption lines typical of GRB supernovae (SNe), which testify to the presence of material with velocities up to $\sim 0.25$c. The spectrum at 3.73\,d allows for the very early identification of a SN associated with a GRB. Reproducing it requires a large photospheric velocity ($35,000 \pm 7000$\,\kms). The kinetic energy of the SN is estimated through models to be \KE $\approx 4 \times 10^{52}$\,erg in spherical symmetry. The ejected mass in the explosion was \Mej $\approx 6.5 \pm 1.5$\,\Msun, much less than that of other GRB-SNe, demonstrating diversity among these events. The total amount of \Nifs\ in the explosion was $0.27 \pm 0.05$\,\Msun. The observed spectra require the presence of freshly synthesised \Nifs\ at the highest velocities, at least 3 times more than a standard GRB-SN. We also find evidence for a decreasing \Nifs\ abundance as a function of decreasing velocity. This suggests that SN\,2016jca was a highly aspherical explosion viewed close to on-axis, powered by a compact remnant. Applying a typical correction for asymmetry, the energy of SN\,2016jca was $\sim$ (1--3) $\times 10^{52}$\,erg, confirming that most of the energy produced by GRB-SNe goes into the kinetic energy of the SN ejecta.
  • Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are indisputably related to star formation, and their vast luminosity in gamma rays pin-points regions of star formation independent of galaxy mass. As such, GRBs provide a unique tool for studying star forming galaxies out to high-z independent of luminosity. Most of our understanding of the properties of GRB hosts (GRBHs) comes from optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up observations, and we therefore have relatively little knowledge of the fraction of dust-enshrouded star formation that resides within GRBHs. Currently ~20% of GRBs show evidence of significant amounts of dust along the line of sight to the afterglow through the host galaxy, and these GRBs tend to reside within redder and more massive galaxies than GRBs with optically bright afterglows. In this paper we present Herschel observations of five GRBHs with evidence of being dust-rich, targeted to understand the dust attenuation properties within GRBs better. Despite the sensitivity of our Herschel observations, only one galaxy in our sample was detected (GRBH 070306), for which we measure a total star formation rate (SFR) of ~100Mstar/yr, and which had a relatively high stellar mass (log[Mstar]=10.34+0.09/-0.04). Nevertheless, when considering a larger sample of GRBHs observed with Herschel, it is clear that stellar mass is not the only factor contributing to a Herschel detection, and significant dust extinction along the GRB sightline (A_{V,GRB}>1.5~mag) appears to be a considerably better tracer of GRBHs with high dust mass. This suggests that the extinguishing dust along the GRB line of sight lies predominantly within the host galaxy ISM, and thus those GRBs with A_{V,GRB}>1~mag but with no host galaxy Herschel detections are likely to have been predominantly extinguished by dust within an intervening dense cloud.
  • An astronomical complex intended to detect optical transients (OTs) in a wide field and follow them up with high time resolution investigation is described.
  • We report the discovery of a Compton-thick AGN and of intense star-formation activity in the nucleus and disk, respectively, of the nearly edge-on superwind galaxy NGC 4666. Spatially unresolved emission is detected by BeppoSAX only at energies <10 keV, whereas spatially resolved emission from the whole disk is detected by XMM-Newton. A prominent (EW ~ 1-2 keV) emission line at ~6.4 keV is detected by both instruments. From the XMM-Newton data alone the line is spectrally localized at E ~ 6.42 +/- 0.03 keV, and seems to be spatially concentrated in the nuclear region of NGC 4666. This, together with the presence of a flat (Gamma ~ 1.3) continuum in the nuclear region, suggests the existence of a strongly absorbed (i.e., Compton-thick) AGN, whose intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity is estimated to be L_{2-10} > 2 x 10^{41} erg/s. At energies <1 keV the integrated (BeppoSAX) spectrum is dominated by a ~0.25 keV thermal gas component distributed throughout the disk (resolved by XMM-Newton). At energies ~2-10 keV, the integrated spectrum is dominated by a steep (G > 2) power-law (PL) component. The latter emission is likely due to unresolved sources with luminosity L ~ 10^{38} - 10^{39} erg/s that are most likely accreting binaries (with BH masses <8 M_sun). Such binaries, which are known to dominate the X-ray point-source luminosity in nearby star-forming galaxies, have Gamma ~ 2 PL spectra in the relevant energy range. A Gamma ~ 1.8 PL contribution from Compton scattering of (the radio-emitting) relativistic electrons by the ambient FIR photons may add a truly diffuse component to the 2-10 keV emission.
  • New BeppoSAX observations of the nearby archetypical starburst galaxies (SBGs) NGC253 and M82 are presented. The main observational result is the unambiguous evidence that the hard (2-10 keV) component is (mostly) produced in both galaxies by thermal emission from a metal-poor (~ 0.1-0.3 solar), hot (kT \~ 6- 9 keV) and extended (see companion paper: Cappi et al. 1998) plasma. Possible origins of this newly discovered component are briefly discussed. A remarkable similarity with the (Milky Way) Galactic Ridge's X-ray emission suggests, nevertheless, a common physical mechanism.
  • We present BeppoSAX results on the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253. Although extended, a large fraction of the X-ray emission comes from the nuclear region. Preliminary analysis of the LECS/MECS/PDS ~0.2-60 keV data from the central 4' region indicates that the continuum is well fitted by two thermal models: a ``soft'' component with kT ~ 0.9 keV, and a ``hard'' component with kT ~ 6 keV absorbed by a column density of ~ 1.2 x10**22 cm-2. For the first time in this object, the Fe K line at 6.7 keV is detected, with an equivalent width of ~ 300 eV. This detection, together with the shape of the 2--60 keV continuum, implies that most of the hard X-ray emission is thermal in origin, and constrains the iron abundances of this component to be ~0.25 of solar. Other lines clearly detected are Si, S and Fe L/Ne, in agreement with previous ASCA results. We discuss our results in the context of the starburst-driven galactic superwind model.
  • The discovery of the peculiar supernova (SN) 1998bw and its possible association with the gamma-ray burst (GRB) 980425$^{1,2,3}$ provide new clues to the understanding of the explosion mechanism of very massive stars and to the origin of some classes of gamma-ray bursts. Its spectra indicate that SN~1998bw is a type Ic supernova$^{3,4}$, but its peak luminosity is unusually high compared with typical type Ic supernovae$^3$. Here we report our findings that the optical spectra and the light curve of SN 1998bw can be well reproduced by an extremely energetic explosion of a massive carbon+oxygen (C+O) star. The kinetic energy is as large as $\sim 2-5 \times 10^{52}$ ergs, more than ten times the previously known energy of supernovae. For this reason, the explosion may be called a `hypernova'. Such a C+O star is the stripped core of a very massive star that has lost its H and He envelopes. The extremely large energy, suggesting the existence of a new mechanism of massive star explosion, can cause a relativistic shock that may be linked to the gamma-ray burst.