• We study projected underdensities in the cosmic galaxy density field known as 'troughs', and their overdense counterparts, which we call 'ridges'. We identify these regions using a bright sample of foreground galaxies from the photometric Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS), specifically selected to mimic the spectroscopic Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey (GAMA). From an independent sample of KiDS background galaxies, we measure the weak gravitational lensing profiles of the troughs/ridges. We quantify their lensing strength $A$ as a function of galaxy density percentile rank $P$ and overdensity $\delta$, and find that the skewness in the galaxy density distribution is reflected in the total mass distribution measured by weak lensing. We interpret our results using the mock galaxy catalogue from the Marenostrum Institut de Ci\`encies de l'Espai (MICE) Grand Challenge lightcone simulation, and find a good agreement with our observations. Using signal-to-noise weights derived from the Scinet LIghtCone Simulations (SLICS) mock catalogue we optimally stack the lensing signal of KiDS troughs with an angular radius $\theta_A$ = {5,10,15,20} arcmin, resulting in {16.8,14.9,10.13,7.55} $\sigma$ detections. Finally, we select troughs using a volume-limited sample of galaxies, split into two redshift bins between 0.1 < z < 0.3. For troughs/ridges with transverse comoving radius $R_A$ = 1.9 Mpc/h, we find no significant difference between the comoving $A'(P)$ and $A'(\delta)$ relation of the low- and high-redshift sample. Using the MICE and SLICS mocks we predict that trough and ridge evolution could be detected with gravitational lensing using deeper and wider lensing surveys, such as those from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Euclid.
  • We present cosmological parameter constraints from a joint analysis of three cosmological probes: the tomographic cosmic shear signal in $\sim$450 deg$^2$ of data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), the galaxy-matter cross-correlation signal of galaxies from the Galaxies And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey determined with KiDS weak lensing, and the angular correlation function of the same GAMA galaxies. We use fast power spectrum estimators that are based on simple integrals over the real-space correlation functions, and show that they are practically unbiased over relevant angular frequency ranges. We test our full pipeline on numerical simulations that are tailored to KiDS and retrieve the input cosmology. By fitting different combinations of power spectra, we demonstrate that the three probes are internally consistent. For all probes combined, we obtain $S_8\equiv \sigma_8 \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}=0.800_{-0.027}^{+0.029}$, consistent with Planck and the fiducial KiDS-450 cosmic shear correlation function results. Marginalising over wide priors on the mean of the tomographic redshift distributions yields consistent results for $S_8$ with an increase of $28\%$ in the error. The combination of probes results in a $26\%$ reduction in uncertainties of $S_8$ over using the cosmic shear power spectra alone. The main gain from these additional probes comes through their constraining power on nuisance parameters, such as the galaxy intrinsic alignment amplitude or potential shifts in the redshift distributions, which are up to a factor of two better constrained compared to using cosmic shear alone, demonstrating the value of large-scale structure probe combination.
  • Tidal gravitational forces can modify the shape of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, thus correlating their orientation with the surrounding matter density field. We study the dependence of this phenomenon, known as intrinsic alignment (IA), on the mass of the dark matter haloes that host these bright structures, analysing the Millennium and Millennium-XXL $N$-body simulations. We closely follow the observational approach, measuring the halo position-halo shape alignment and subsequently dividing out the dependence on halo bias. We derive a theoretical scaling of the IA amplitude with mass in a dark matter universe, and predict a power-law with slope $\beta_{\mathrm{M}}$ in the range $1/3$ to $1/2$, depending on mass scale. We find that the simulation data agree with each other and with the theoretical prediction remarkably well over three orders of magnitude in mass, with the joint analysis yielding an estimate of $\beta_{\mathrm{M}} = 0.36^{+0.01}_{-0.01}$. This result does not depend on redshift or on the details of the halo shape measurement. The analysis is repeated on observational data, obtaining a significantly higher value, $\beta_{\mathrm{M}} = 0.56^{+0.05}_{-0.05}$. There are also small but significant deviations from our simple model in the simulation signals at both the high- and low-mass end. We discuss possible reasons for these discrepancies, and argue that they can be attributed to physical processes not captured in the model or in the dark matter-only simulations.
  • We measure the alignment of the shapes of galaxy clusters, as traced by their satellite distributions, with the matter density field using the public redMaPPer catalogue based on SDSS-DR8, which contains 26 111 clusters up to z~0.6. The clusters are split into nine redshift and richness samples; in each of them we detect a positive alignment, showing that clusters point towards density peaks. We interpret the measurements within the tidal alignment paradigm, allowing for a richness and redshift dependence. The intrinsic alignment (IA) amplitude at the pivot redshift z=0.3 and pivot richness \lambda=30 is A_{IA}^{gen}=12.6_{-1.2}^{+1.5}. We obtain tentative evidence that the signal increases towards higher richness and lower redshift. Our measurements agree well with results of maxBCG clusters and with dark-matter-only simulations. Comparing our results to IA measurements of luminous red galaxies, we find that the IA amplitude of galaxy clusters forms a smooth extension towards higher mass. This suggests that these systems share a common alignment mechanism, which can be exploited to improve our physical understanding of IA.
  • We constrain the average halo ellipticity of ~2 600 galaxy groups from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, using the weak gravitational lensing signal measured from the overlapping Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). To do so, we quantify the azimuthal dependence of the stacked lensing signal around seven different proxies for the orientation of the dark matter distribution, as it is a priori unknown which one traces the orientation best. On small scales, the major axis of the brightest group/cluster member (BCG) provides the best proxy, leading to a clear detection of an anisotropic signal. In order to relate that to a halo ellipticity, we have to adopt a model density profile. We derive new expressions for the quadrupole moments of the shear field given an elliptical model surface mass density profile. Modeling the signal with an elliptical Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile on scales < 250 kpc, which roughly corresponds to half the virial radius, and assuming that the BCG is perfectly aligned with the dark matter, we find an average halo ellipticity of e_h=0.38 +/- 0.12. This agrees well with results from cold-dark-matter-only simulations, which typically report values of e_h ~ 0.3. On larger scales, the lensing signal around the BCGs does not trace the dark matter distribution well, and the distribution of group satellites provides a better proxy for the halo's orientation instead, leading to a 3--4 sigma detection of a non-zero halo ellipticity at scales between 250 kpc and 750 kpc. Our results suggest that the distribution of stars enclosed within a certain radius forms a good proxy for the orientation of the dark matter within that radius, which has also been observed in hydrodynamical simulations.
  • We present new tests to identify stationary position-dependent additive shear biases in weak gravitational lensing data sets. These tests are important diagnostics for currently ongoing and planned cosmic shear surveys, as such biases induce coherent shear patterns that can mimic and potentially bias the cosmic shear signal. The central idea of these tests is to determine the average ellipticity of all galaxies with shape measurements in a grid in the pixel plane. The distribution of the absolute values of these averaged ellipticities can be compared to randomized catalogues; a difference points to systematics in the data. In addition, we introduce a method to quantify the spatial correlation of the additive bias, which suppresses the contribution from cosmic shear and therefore eases the identification of a position-dependent additive shear bias in the data. We apply these tests to the publicly available shear catalogues from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) and the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and find evidence for a small but non-negligible residual additive bias at small scales. As this residual bias is smaller than the error on the shear correlation signal at those scales, it is highly unlikely that it causes a significant bias in the published cosmic shear results of CFHTLenS. In CFHTLenS, the amplitude of this systematic signal is consistent with zero in fields where the number of stars used to model the PSF is higher than average, suggesting that the position-dependent additive shear bias originates from undersampled PSF variations across the image.
  • We study the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies in the range 9.7<log_10(M_*/h^-2 M_sun)<11.7 and z<0.4, obtained from a combined analysis of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We use ~100 deg^2 of KiDS data to study the lensing signal around galaxies for which spectroscopic redshifts and stellar masses were determined by GAMA. We show that lensing alone results in poor constraints on the stellar-to-halo mass relation due to a degeneracy between the satellite fraction and the halo mass, which is lifted when we simultaneously fit the stellar mass function. At M_sun>5x10^10 h^-2 M_sun, the stellar mass increases with halo mass as ~M_h^0.25. The ratio of dark matter to stellar mass has a minimum at a halo mass of 8x10^11 h^-1 M_sun with a value of M_h/M_*=56_-10^+16 [h]. We also use the GAMA group catalogue to select centrals and satellites in groups with five or more members, which trace regions in space where the local matter density is higher than average, and determine for the first time the stellar-to-halo mass relation in these denser environments. We find no significant differences compared to the relation from the full sample, which suggests that the stellar-to-halo mass relation does not vary strongly with local density. Furthermore, we find that the stellar-to-halo mass relation of central galaxies can also be obtained by modelling the lensing signal and stellar mass function of satellite galaxies only, which shows that the assumptions to model the satellite contribution in the halo model do not significantly bias the stellar-to-halo mass relation. Finally, we show that the combination of weak lensing with the stellar mass function can be used to test the purity of group catalogues.
  • We investigate possible signatures of halo assembly bias for spectroscopically selected galaxy groups from the GAMA survey using weak lensing measurements from the spatially overlapping regions of the deeper, high-imaging-quality photometric KiDS survey. We use GAMA groups with an apparent richness larger than 4 to identify samples with comparable mean host halo masses but with a different radial distribution of satellite galaxies, which is a proxy for the formation time of the haloes. We measure the weak lensing signal for groups with a steeper than average and with a shallower than average satellite distribution and find no sign of halo assembly bias, with the bias ratio of $0.85^{+0.37}_{-0.25}$, which is consistent with the $\Lambda$CDM prediction. Our galaxy groups have typical masses of $10^{13} M_{\odot}/h$, naturally complementing previous studies of halo assembly bias on galaxy cluster scales.
  • We present predictions for the galaxy-galaxy lensing profile from the EAGLE hydrodynamical cosmological simulation at redshift z=0.18, in the spatial range 0.02 < R/(Mpc/h) < 2, and for five logarithmically equi-spaced stellar mass bins in the range 10.3 < $\log_{10}$(Mstar/ $M_{\odot}$) < 11.8. We compare these excess surface density profiles to the observed signal from background galaxies imaged by the Kilo Degree Survey around spectroscopically confirmed foreground galaxies from the GAMA survey. Exploiting the GAMA galaxy group catalogue, the profiles of central and satellite galaxies are computed separately for groups with at least five members to minimise contamination. EAGLE predictions are in broad agreement with the observed profiles for both central and satellite galaxies, although the signal is underestimated at R$\approx$0.5-2 Mpc/h for the highest stellar mass bins. When central and satellite galaxies are considered simultaneously, agreement is found only when the selection function of lens galaxies is taken into account in detail. Specifically, in the case of GAMA galaxies, it is crucial to account for the variation of the fraction of satellite galaxies in bins of stellar mass induced by the flux-limited nature of the survey. We report the inferred stellar-to-halo mass relation and we find good agreement with recent published results. We note how the precision of the galaxy-galaxy lensing profiles in the simulation holds the potential to constrain fine-grained aspects of the galaxy-dark matter connection.
  • Galaxies and their dark matter haloes are part of a complex network of mass structures, collectively called the cosmic web. Using the tidal tensor prescription these structures can be classified into four cosmic environments: voids, sheets, filaments and knots. As the cosmic web may influence the formation and evolution of dark matter haloes and the galaxies they host, we aim to study the effect of these cosmic environments on the average mass of galactic haloes. To this end we measure the galaxy-galaxy lensing profile of 91,195 galaxies, within 0.039 < z < 0.263, from the spectroscopic Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, using ~100 square degrees of overlapping data from the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS). In each of the four cosmic environments we model the contributions from group centrals, satellites and neighbouring groups to the stacked galaxy-galaxy lensing profiles. After correcting the lens samples for differences in the stellar mass distribution, we find no dependence of the average halo mass of central galaxies on their cosmic environment. We do find a significant increase in the average contribution of neighbouring groups to the lensing profile in increasingly dense cosmic environments. We show, however, that the observed effect can be entirely attributed to the galaxy density at much smaller scales (within 4 Mpc/h), which is correlated with the density of the cosmic environments. Within our current uncertainties we find no direct dependence of galaxy halo mass on their cosmic environment.
  • We study a sample of ~10^4 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.2<z<0.8 with masses M_200 > 5x10^13 h_70^-1 M_sun, discovered in the second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). The depth and excellent image quality of the RCS2 enable us to detect the cluster-mass cross-correlation up to z~0.7. To obtain cluster masses, concentrations and halo biases, we fit a cluster halo model simultaneously to the lensing signal and to the projected density profile of red-sequence cluster members, as the latter provides tight constraints on the cluster miscentring distribution. We parametrise the mass-richness relation as M_200 = A x (N_200/20)^alpha, and find A = (15.0 +- 0.8) x 10^13 h_70^-1 M_sun and alpha = 0.73 +- 0.07 at low redshift (0.2<z<0.35). At intermediate redshift (0.35<z<0.55), we find a higher normalisation, which points at a fractional increase of the richness towards lower redshift caused by the build-up of the red-sequence. The miscentring distribution is well constrained. Only ~30% of our BCGs coincide with the peak of the dark matter distribution. The distribution of the remaining BCGs are modelled with a 2D-Gaussian, whose width increases from 0.2 to 0.4 h_70^-1 Mpc towards higher masses; the ratio of width and r_200 is constant with mass and has an average value of 0.44 +- 0.01. The mass-concentration and mass-bias relation agree fairly well with literature results at low redshift, but have a higher normalisation at higher redshifts, which may be due to selection and projection effects. The concentration of the satellite distribution decreases with mass and is correlated with the concentration of the halo.
  • We present weak lensing constraints on the ellipticity of galaxy-scale matter haloes and the galaxy-halo misalignment. Using data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), we measure the weighted-average ratio of the aligned projected ellipticity components of galaxy matter haloes and their embedded galaxies, $f_\mathrm{h}$, split by galaxy type. We then compare our observations to measurements taken from the Millennium Simulation, assuming different models of galaxy-halo misalignment. Using the Millennium Simulation we verify that the statistical estimator used removes contamination from cosmic shear. We also detect an additional signal in the simulation, which we interpret as the impact of intrinsic shape-shear alignments between the lenses and their large-scale structure environment. These alignments are likely to have caused some of the previous observational constraints on $f_\mathrm{h}$ to be biased high. From CFHTLenS we find $f_\mathrm{h}=-0.04 \pm 0.25$ for early-type galaxies, which is consistent with current models for the galaxy-halo misalignment predicting $f_\mathrm{h}\simeq 0.20$. For late-type galaxies we measure $f_\mathrm{h}=0.69_{-0.36}^{+0.37}$ from CFHTLenS. This can be compared to the simulated results which yield $f_\mathrm{h}\simeq 0.02$ for misaligned late-type models.
  • The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is a multi-band imaging survey designed for cosmological studies from weak lensing and photometric redshifts. It uses the ESO VLT Survey Telescope with its wide-field camera OmegaCAM. KiDS images are taken in four filters similar to the SDSS ugri bands. The best-seeing time is reserved for deep r-band observations that reach a median 5-sigma limiting AB magnitude of 24.9 with a median seeing that is better than 0.7arcsec. Initial KiDS observations have concentrated on the GAMA regions near the celestial equator, where extensive, highly complete redshift catalogues are available. A total of 109 survey tiles, one square degree each, form the basis of the first set of lensing analyses, which focus on measurements of halo properties of GAMA galaxies. 9 galaxies per square arcminute enter the lensing analysis, for an effective inverse shear variance of 69 per square arcminute. Accounting for the shape measurement weight, the median redshift of the sources is 0.53. KiDS data processing follows two parallel tracks, one optimized for galaxy shape measurement (for weak lensing), and one for accurate matched-aperture photometry in four bands (for photometric redshifts). This technical paper describes how the lensing and photometric redshift catalogues have been produced (including an extensive description of the Gaussian Aperture and Photometry pipeline), summarizes the data quality, and presents extensive tests for systematic errors that might affect the lensing analyses. We also provide first demonstrations of the suitability of the data for cosmological measurements, and explain how the shear catalogues were blinded to prevent confirmation bias in the scientific analyses. The KiDS shear and photometric redshift catalogues, presented in this paper, are released to the community through http://kids.strw.leidenuniv.nl .
  • We use the first 100 sq. deg. of overlap between the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to determine the galaxy halo mass of ~10,000 spectroscopically-confirmed satellite galaxies in massive ($M > 10^{13}h^{-1}{\rm M}_\odot$) galaxy groups. Separating the sample as a function of projected distance to the group centre, we jointly model the satellites and their host groups with Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profiles, fully accounting for the data covariance. The probed satellite galaxies in these groups have total masses $\log M_{\rm sub} /(h^{-1}{\rm M}_\odot) \approx 11.7 - 12.2$ consistent across group-centric distance within the errorbars. Given their typical stellar masses, $\log M_{\rm \star,sat}/(h^{-2}{\rm M}_\odot) \sim 10.5$, such total masses imply stellar mass fractions of $M_{\rm \star,sat} /M_{\rm sub} \approx 0.04 h^{-1}$ . The average subhalo hosting these satellite galaxies has a mass $M_{\rm sub} \sim 0.015M_{\rm host}$ independent of host halo mass, in broad agreement with the expectations of structure formation in a $\Lambda$CDM universe.
  • The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the VLT Survey Telescope and the OmegaCAM camera. KiDS will image 1500 square degrees in four filters (ugri), and together with its near-infrared counterpart VIKING will produce deep photometry in nine bands. Designed for weak lensing shape and photometric redshift measurements, the core science driver of the survey is mapping the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe back to a redshift of ~0.5. Secondary science cases are manifold, covering topics such as galaxy evolution, Milky Way structure, and the detection of high-redshift clusters and quasars. KiDS is an ESO Public Survey and dedicated to serving the astronomical community with high-quality data products derived from the survey data, as well as with calibration data. Public data releases will be made on a yearly basis, the first two of which are presented here. For a total of 148 survey tiles (~160 sq.deg.) astrometrically and photometrically calibrated, coadded ugri images have been released, accompanied by weight maps, masks, source lists, and a multi-band source catalog. A dedicated pipeline and data management system based on the Astro-WISE software system, combined with newly developed masking and source classification software, is used for the data production of the data products described here. The achieved data quality and early science projects based on the data products in the first two data releases are reviewed in order to validate the survey data. Early scientific results include the detection of nine high-z QSOs, fifteen candidate strong gravitational lenses, high-quality photometric redshifts and galaxy structural parameters for hundreds of thousands of galaxies. (Abridged)
  • We study the evolution of the luminosity-to-halo mass relation of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). We select a sample of 52 000 LOWZ and CMASS LRGs from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) SDSS-DR10 in the ~450 deg^2 that overlaps with imaging data from the second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2), group them into bins of absolute magnitude and redshift and measure their weak lensing signals. The source redshift distribution has a median of 0.7, which allows us to study the lensing signal as a function of lens redshift. We interpret the lensing signal using a halo model, from which we obtain the halo masses as well as the normalisations of the mass-concentration relations. We find that the concentration of haloes that host LRGs is consistent with dark matter only simulations once we allow for miscentering or satellites in the modelling. The slope of the luminosity-to-halo mass relation has a typical value of 1.4 and does not change with redshift, but we do find evidence for a change in amplitude: the average halo mass of LOWZ galaxies increases by 25_{-14}^{+16} % between z=0.36 and 0.22 to an average value of 6.43+/-0.52 x 10^13 h70^-1 Msun. If we extend the redshift range using the CMASS galaxies and assume that they are the progenitors of the LOWZ sample, we find that the average mass of LRGs increases by 80^{+39}_{-28} % between z=0.6 and 0.2
  • Galaxy-galaxy weak lensing is a direct probe of the mean matter distribution around galaxies. The depth and sky coverage of the CFHT Legacy Survey yield statistically significant galaxy halo mass measurements over a much wider range of stellar masses ($10^{8.75}$ to $10^{11.3} M_{\odot}$) and redshifts ($0.2 < z < 0.8$) than previous weak lensing studies. At redshift $z \sim 0.5$, the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR) reaches a maximum of $4.0\pm0.2$ percent as a function of halo mass at $\sim 10^{12.25} M_{\odot}$. We find, for the first time from weak lensing alone, evidence for significant evolution in the SHMR: the peak ratio falls as a function of cosmic time from $4.5 \pm 0.3$ percent at $z \sim 0.7$ to $3.4 \pm 0.2$ percent at $z \sim 0.3$, and shifts to lower stellar mass haloes. These evolutionary trends are dominated by red galaxies, and are consistent with a model in which the stellar mass above which star formation is quenched "downsizes" with cosmic time. In contrast, the SHMR of blue, star-forming galaxies is well-fit by a power law that does not evolve with time. This suggests that blue galaxies form stars at a rate that is balanced with their dark matter accretion in such a way that they evolve along the SHMR locus. The redshift dependence of the SHMR can be used to constrain the evolution of the galaxy population over cosmic time.
  • We present a study of the relation between dark matter halo mass and the baryonic content of host galaxies, quantified via luminosity and stellar mass. Our investigation uses 154 deg2 of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) lensing and photometric data, obtained from the CFHT Legacy Survey. We employ a galaxy-galaxy lensing halo model which allows us to constrain the halo mass and the satellite fraction. Our analysis is limited to lenses at redshifts between 0.2 and 0.4. We express the relationship between halo mass and baryonic observable as a power law. For the luminosity-halo mass relation we find a slope of 1.32+/-0.06 and a normalisation of 1.19+0.06-0.07x10^13 h70^-1 Msun for red galaxies, while for blue galaxies the best-fit slope is 1.09+0.20-0.13 and the normalisation is 0.18+0.04-0.05x10^13 h70^-1 Msun. Similarly, we find a best-fit slope of 1.36+0.06-0.07 and a normalisation of 1.43+0.11-0.08x10^13 h70^-1 Msun for the stellar mass-halo mass relation of red galaxies, while for blue galaxies the corresponding values are 0.98+0.08-0.07 and 0.84+0.20-0.16x10^13 h70^-1 Msun. For red lenses, the fraction which are satellites tends to decrease with luminosity and stellar mass, with the sample being nearly all satellites for a stellar mass of 2x10^9 h70^-2 Msun. The satellite fractions are generally close to zero for blue lenses, irrespective of luminosity or stellar mass. This, together with the shallower relation between halo mass and baryonic tracer, is a direct confirmation from galaxy-galaxy lensing that blue galaxies reside in less clustered environments than red galaxies. We also find that the halo model, while matching the lensing signal around red lenses well, is prone to over-predicting the large-scale signal for faint and less massive blue lenses. This could be a further indication that these galaxies tend to be more isolated than assumed. [abridged]
  • We present a quantitative analysis of the largest contiguous maps of projected mass density obtained from gravitational lensing shear. We use data from the 154 deg2 covered by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey. Our study is the first attempt to quantitatively characterize the scientific value of lensing maps, which could serve in the future as a complementary approach to the study of the dark universe with gravitational lensing. We show that mass maps contain unique cosmological information beyond that of traditional two-points statistical analysis techniques. Using a series of numerical simulations, we first show how, reproducing the CFHTLenS observing conditions, gravitational lensing inversion provides a reliable estimate of the projected matter distribution of large scale structure. We validate our analysis by quantifying the robustness of the maps with various statistical estimators. We then apply the same process to the CFHTLenS data. We find that the 2-points correlation function of the projected mass is consistent with the cosmological analysis performed on the shear correlation function discussed in the CFHTLenS companion papers. The maps also lead to a significant measurement of the third order moment of the projected mass, which is in agreement with analytic predictions, and to a marginal detection of the fourth order moment. Tests for residual systematics are found to be consistent with zero for the statistical estimators we used. A new approach for the comparison of the reconstructed mass map to that predicted from the galaxy distribution reveals the existence of giant voids in the dark matter maps as large as 3 degrees on the sky. Our analysis shows that lensing mass maps can be used for new techniques such as peak statistics and the morphological analysis of the projected dark matter distribution.
  • The clustering of galaxies and the matter distribution around them can be described using the halo model complemented with a realistic description of the way galaxies populate dark matter haloes. This has been used successfully to describe statistical properties of samples of galaxies at z<0.2. Without adjusting any model parameters, we compare the predicted weak lensing signal induced by Luminous Red Galaxies to measurements from SDSS DR7 on much larger scales (up to ~90 h_{70}^{-1} Mpc) and at higher redshift (z~0.4). We find excellent agreement, suggesting that the model captures the main properties of the galaxy-dark matter connection. To extend the comparison to lenses at even higher redshifts we complement the SDSS data with shape measurements from the deeper RCS2, resulting in precise lensing measurements for lenses up to z~0.6. These measurements are also well described using the same model. Considering solely these weak lensing measurements, we robustly assess that, up to z~0.6, the number of central galaxies as a function of halo mass is well described by a log-normal distribution with scatter $\sigma_{\log L_{\rm c}}=0.146\pm0.011$, in agreement with previous independent studies at lower redshift. Our results demonstrate the value of complementing the information about the properties of the (lens) galaxies provided by SDSS with deeper, high-quality imaging data.
  • We use weak gravitational lensing to analyse the dark matter halos around satellite galaxies in galaxy groups in the CFHTLenS dataset. This dataset is derived from the CFHTLS-Wide survey, and encompasses 154 sq. deg of high-quality shape data. Using the photometric redshifts, we divide the sample of lens galaxies with stellar masses in the range 10^9 Msun to 10^10.5 Msun into those likely to lie in high-density environments (HDE) and those likely to lie in low-density environments (LDE). Through comparison with galaxy catalogues extracted from the Millennium Simulation, we show that the sample of HDE galaxies should primarily (~61%) consist of satellite galaxies in groups, while the sample of LDE galaxies should consist of mostly (~87%) non-satellite (field and central) galaxies. Comparing the lensing signals around samples of HDE and LDE galaxies matched in stellar mass, the lensing signal around HDE galaxies clearly shows a positive contribution from their host groups on their lensing signals at radii of ~500--1000 kpc, the typical separation between satellites and group centres. More importantly, the subhalos of HDE galaxies are less massive than those around LDE galaxies by a factor 0.65 +/- 0.12, significant at the 2.9 sigma level. A natural explanation is that the halos of satellite galaxies are stripped through tidal effects in the group environment. Our results are consistent with a typical tidal truncation radius of ~40 kpc.
  • We present the results of a weak gravitational lensing analysis to determine whether the stellar mass or the velocity dispersion is more closely related to the amplitude of the lensing signal around galaxies - and hence to the projected distribution of dark matter. The lensing signal on scales smaller than the virial radius corresponds most closely to the lensing velocity dispersion in the case of a singular isothermal profile, but is on larger scales also sensitive to the clustering of the haloes. We select over 4000 lens galaxies at a redshift z<0.2 with concentrated (or bulge-dominated) surface brightness profiles from the ~300 square degree overlap between the Red-sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS2) and the data release 7 (DR7) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We consider both the spectroscopic velocity dispersion and a model velocity dispersion (a combination of the stellar mass, the size and the Sersic index of a galaxy). Comparing the model and spectroscopic velocity dispersion we find that they correlate well for galaxies with concentrated brightness profiles. We find that the stellar mass and the spectroscopic velocity dispersion trace the amplitude of the lensing signal on small scales equally well. The model velocity dispersion, however, does significantly worse. A possible explanation is that the halo properties that determine the small-scale lensing signal - mainly the total mass - also depend on the structural parameters of galaxies, such as the effective radius and Sersic index, but we lack data for a definitive conclusion.
  • We present the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) that accurately determines a weak gravitational lensing signal from the full 154 square degrees of deep multi-colour data obtained by the CFHT Legacy Survey. Weak gravitational lensing by large-scale structure is widely recognised as one of the most powerful but technically challenging probes of cosmology. We outline the CFHTLenS analysis pipeline, describing how and why every step of the chain from the raw pixel data to the lensing shear and photometric redshift measurement has been revised and improved compared to previous analyses of a subset of the same data. We present a novel method to identify data which contributes a non-negligible contamination to our sample and quantify the required level of calibration for the survey. Through a series of cosmology-insensitive tests we demonstrate the robustness of the resulting cosmic shear signal, presenting a science-ready shear and photometric redshift catalogue for future exploitation.
  • We study the shapes of galaxy dark matter haloes by measuring the anisotropy of the weak gravitational lensing signal around galaxies in the second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). We determine the average shear anisotropy within the virial radius for three lens samples: all galaxies with 19<m_r'<21.5, and the `red' and `blue' samples, whose lensing signals are dominated by massive low-redshift early-type and late-type galaxies, respectively. To study the environmental dependence of the lensing signal, we separate each lens sample into an isolated and clustered part and analyse them separately. We also measure the azimuthal dependence of the distribution of physically associated galaxies around the lens samples. We find that these satellites preferentially reside near the major axis of the lenses, and constrain the angle between the major axis of the lens and the average location of the satellites to <theta>=43.7 deg +/- 0.3 deg for the `all' lenses, <theta>=41.7 deg +/- 0.5 deg for the `red' lenses and <theta>=42.0 deg +/- 1.4 deg for the `blue' lenses. For the `all' sample, we find that the anisotropy of the galaxy-mass cross-correlation function <f-f_45>=0.23 +/- 0.12, providing weak support for the view that the average galaxy is embedded in, and preferentially aligned with, a triaxial dark matter halo. Assuming an elliptical Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we find that the ratio of the dark matter halo ellipticity and the galaxy ellipticity f_h=e_h/e_g=1.50+1.03-1.01, which for a mean lens ellipticity of 0.25 corresponds to a projected halo ellipticity of e_h=0.38+0.26-0.25 if the halo and the lens are perfectly aligned. For isolated galaxies of the `all' sample, the average shear anisotropy increases to <f-f_45>=0.51+0.26-0.25 and f_h=4.73+2.17-2.05, whilst for clustered galaxies the signal is consistent with zero. (abridged)
  • We present the results of a study of weak gravitational lensing by galaxies using imaging data that were obtained as part of the second Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). In order to compare to the baryonic properties of the lenses we focus here on the ~300 square degrees that overlap with the DR7 of the SDSS. The depth and image quality of the RCS2 enables us to significantly improve upon earlier work for luminous galaxies at z>=0.3. Comparison with dynamical masses from the SDSS shows a good correlation with the lensing mass for early-type galaxies. For low luminosity (stellar mass) early-type galaxies we find a satellite fraction of ~40% which rapidly decreases to <10% with increasing luminosity (stellar mass). The satellite fraction of the late-types has a value in the range 0-15%. We find that early-types in the range 10^10<L_r<10^11.5 Lsun have virial masses that are about five times higher than those of late-type galaxies and that the mass scales as M_200 \propto L^2.34 +0.09 \ -0.16. We also measure the virial mass-to-light ratio, and find for L_200<10^11 Lsun a value of M_200/L_200=42+-10 for early-types, which increases for higher luminosities to values that are consistent with those observed for groups and clusters of galaxies. For late-type galaxies we find a lower value of M_200/L_200=17+-9. Our measurements also show that early- and late-type galaxies have comparable halo masses for stellar masses M_*<10^11 Msun, whereas the virial masses of early-type galaxies are higher for higher stellar masses. Finally, we determine the efficiency with which baryons have been converted into stars. Our results for early-type galaxies suggest a variation in efficiency with a minimum of ~10% for a stellar mass M_*,200=10^12 Msun. The results for the late-type galaxies are not well constrained, but do suggest a larger value. (abridged)