• A pupil plane wavefront reconstruction procedure is proposed based on analysis of a sequence of focal plane images corresponding to a sequence of random pupil plane phase probes. The developed method provides the unique nontrivial solution of wavefront retrieval problem and shows global convergence to this solution demonstrated using a Gerchberg-Saxton implementation. The method is general and can be used in any optical system that includes deformable mirrors for active/adaptive wavefront correction. The presented numerical simulation and lab experimental results show low noise sensitivity, high reliability and robustness of the proposed approach for high quality optical wavefront restoration. Laboratory experiments have shown $\lambda$/14 rms accuracy in retrieval of a poked DM actuator fiducial pattern with spatial resolution of 20-30$~\mu$m that is comparable with accuracy of direct high-resolution interferometric measurements.
  • Ground-based telescopes have been playing a leading role in exoplanet direct imaging science and technological development for the past two decades and will continue to have an indispensable role for the next decade and beyond. Extreme adaptive optics (AO) systems will advance focal-plane wavefront control and coronagraphy, augmenting the performance of and mitigating risk for WFIRST-CGI, while validating performance requirements and motivating improvements to atmosphere models needed to unambiguously characterize solar system-analogues with HabEx/LUVOIR. Specialized instruments for Extremely Large Telescopes may deliver the first thermal infrared images of rocky planets around Sun-like stars, providing HabEx/LUVOIR with numerous exo-Earth candidates and key ancillary information that can help clarify whether the planets are habitable.
  • Project Blue is designed to deliver a small coronagraphic space telescope mission to low-Earth orbit capable of detecting an Earth-like planet in the habitable zones of the Sun-like stars Alpha Centauri A and B within the next 4 years within a Mission of Opportunity budget envelope. The concept heavily leverages emerging commercial capabilities -- including the telescope optics, spacecraft bus and launch vehicle -- and emphasizes a public-private partnership approach.
  • Exoplanets mass measurements will be a critical next step to assess the habitability of Earth-like planets: a key aspect of the 2020 vision in the previous decadal survey and also central to NASA's strategic priorities. Precision astrometry delivers measurement of exoplanet masses, allowing discrimination of rocky planets from water worlds and enabling much better modeling of their atmosphere improving species retrieval from spectroscopy. The scientific potential of astrometry will be enormous. The intrinsic astrophysical noise floor set by star spots and stellar surface activity is about a factor of ten more benign for astrometry than for the more established technique of Radial Velocity, widening the discovery region and pushing detection thresholds to lower masses than previously possible. On the instrumental side, precision astrometry is limited by optical field distortion and detector calibration issues. Both technical challenges are now being addressed successfully in the laboratory. However, we have identified the need to continue these technology development efforts to achieve sub-microarcsecond astrometry precision necessary for detection and characterization of Earth-like planets around nearby FGK stars. The international community has realized the importance of astrometry, and various astrometry missions have been proposed and under development, with a few high profile missions now operational. We believe that it is vital for the U.S. scientific community to participate in the development of these new technologies and scientific discoveries. We recommend exploring alternatives to incorporate astrometric capabilities into future exoplanet flagship missions such as HABEX and LUVOIR, substantially increasing the scientific return associated with the expected yield of earth-like planets to be recovered.
  • Because of the recent technological advances, the key technologies needed for precision space optical astrometry are now in hand. The Microarcsecond Astrometry Probe (MAP) mission concept is designed to find 1 Earth mass planets at 1AU orbit (scaled to solar luminosity) around the nearest ~90 FGK stars. The MAP payload includes i) a single three-mirror anastigmatic telescope with a 1-m primary mirror and metrology subsystems, and ii) a camera. The camera focal plane consists of 42 detectors, providing a Nyquist sampled FOV of 0.4-deg. Its metrology subsystems ensure that MAP can achieve the 0.8 uas astrometric precision in 1 hr, which is required to detect Earth-like exoplanets in our stellar neighborhood. MAP mission could provide ~10 specific targets for a much larger coronagraphic mission that would measure its spectra. We argue for the development of the space astrometric missions capable of finding Earth-2.0. Given the current technology readiness such missions relying on precision astrometry could be flown in the next decade, perhaps in collaboration with other national space agencies.
  • The EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer (EXCEDE) science mission concept uses a visible-wavelength Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph to enable high-contrast imaging of circumstellar debris systems and some giant planets at angular separations reaching into the habitable zones of some of the nearest stars. We report on the experimental results obtained in the vacuum chamber at the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in 10% broadband light centered about 650 nm, with a median contrast of $1 \times 10^{-5}$ between 1.2 and 2.0 $\lambda$/D simultaneously with $3 \times 10^{-7}$ contrast between 2 and 11 $\lambda/D$ for a single-sided dark hole using a deformable mirror (DM) upstream of the PIAA coronagraph. These results are stable and repeatable as demonstrated by three measurements runs with DM settings set from scratch and maintained on the best 90% out of the 1000 collected frames. We compare the reduced experimental data with simulation results from modeling observed experimental limits; observed performance is consistent with uncorrected low-order modes not estimated by the Low Order Wavefront Sensor (LOWFS). Modeled sensitivity to bandwidth and residual tip/tilt modes is well-matched to the experiment.
  • We explore the capabilities of a starshade mission to directly image multi-star systems. In addition to the diffracted and scattered light for the on-axis star, a multi-star system features additional starlight leakage from the off-axis star that must also be controlled. A basic option is for additional starshades to block the off-axis stars. An interesting option takes the form of hybrid operation of a starshade in conjunction with an internal starlight suppression. Two hybrid scenarios are considered. One such scenario includes the coronagraph instrument blocking the on-axis star, with the starshade blocking off-axis starlight. Another scenario uses the wavefront control system in the coronagraph instrument and using a recent Super-Nyquist Wavefront Control (SNWC) technique can remove the off-axis stellar leakage to enable a region of high-contrast around the on-axis star blocked by the starshade.We present simulation results relevant for the WFIRST telescope.
  • At a distance of 2~pc, our nearest brown dwarf neighbor, Luhman 16 AB, has been extensively studied since its discovery 3 years ago, yet its most fundamental parameter -- the masses of the individual dwarfs -- has not been constrained with precision. In this work we present the full astrometric orbit and barycentric motion of Luhman 16 AB and the first precision measurements of the individual component masses. We draw upon archival observations spanning 31 years from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Schmidt Telescope, the Deep Near-Infrared Survey of the Southern Sky (DENIS), public FORS2 data on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), and new astrometry from the Gemini South Multiconjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS). Finally, we include three radial velocity measurements of the two components from VLT/CRIRES, spanning one year. With this new data sampling a full period of the orbit, we use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to fit a 16-parameter model incorporating mutual orbit and barycentric motion parameters and constrain the individual masses to be~$27.9^{+1.1}_{-1.0}$~$M_{J}$ for the T dwarf and~$34.2^{+1.3}_{-1.1}$~$M_{J}$ for the L dwarf. Our measurements of Luhman 16 AB's mass ratio and barycentric motion parameters are consistent with previous estimates in the literature utilizing recent astrometry only. The GeMS-derived measurements of the Luhman 16 AB separation in 2014-2015 agree closely with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) measurements made during the same epoch Bedin et al. 2017, and the derived mutual orbit agrees with those measurements to within the HST uncertainties of $0.3 - 0.4$ milliarcseconds.
  • Direct imaging of exoplanets represents a challenge for astronomical instrumentation due to the high-contrast ratio and small angular separation between the host star and the faint planet. Multi-star systems pose additional challenges for coronagraphic instruments due to the diffraction and aberration leakage caused by companion stars. Consequently, many scientifically valuable multi-star systems are excluded from direct imaging target lists for exoplanet surveys and characterization missions. Multi-star wavefront control (MSWC) is a technique that uses a coronagraphic instrument's deformable mirror (DM) to create high-contrast regions in the focal plane in the presence of multiple stars. Our previous paper introduced the Super-Nyquist Wavefront Control (SNWC) technique that uses a diffraction grating to enable the DM to generate high-contrast regions beyond the nominal region correctable by the DM. These two techniques can be combined to generate high-contrast regions for multi-star systems at any angular separation. As a case study, a high-contrast wavefront control (WC) simulation that applies these techniques shows that the habitable region of the Alpha Centauri system can be imaged reaching at least $8 \times 10^{-9}$ mean contrast in 10\% broadband light in one-sided dark holes from 1.6-5.5$\lambda/D$.
  • High-Performance Adaptive Optics systems are rapidly spreading as useful applications in the fields of astronomy, ophthalmology, and telecommunications. This technology is critical to enable coronagraphic direct imaging of exoplanets utilized in ground-based telescopes and future space missions such as WFIRST, EXO-C, HabEx, and LUVOIR. We have developed a miniaturized Deformable Mirror controller to enable active optics on small space imaging mission. The system is based on the Boston Micromachines Corporation Kilo-DM, which is one of the most widespread DMs on the market. The system has three main components: The Deformable Mirror, the Driving Electronics, and the Mechanical and Heat management. The system is designed to be extremely compact and have low- power consumption to enable its use not only on exoplanet missions, but also in a wide-range of applications that require precision optical systems, such as direct line-of-sight laser communications, and guidance systems. The controller is capable of handling 1,024 actuators with 220V maximum dynamic range, 16bit resolution, and 14bit accuracy, and operating at up to 1kHz frequency. The system fits in a 10x10x5cm volume, weighs less than 0.5kg, and consumes less than 8W. We have developed a turnkey solution reducing the risk for currently planned as well as future missions, lowering their cost by significantly reducing volume, weight and power consumption of the wavefront control hardware.
  • This is a joint summary of the reports from the three Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) in response to the "Planning for the 2020 Decadal Survey" charge given by the Astrophysics Division Director Paul Hertz. This joint executive summary contains points of consensus across all three PAGs. Additional findings specific to the individual PAGs are reported separately in the individual reports. The PAGs concur that all four large mission concepts identified in the white paper as candidates for maturation prior to the 2020 Decadal Survey should be studied in detail. These include the Far-IR Surveyor, the Habitable-Exoplanet Imaging Mission, the UV/Optical/IR Surveyor, and the X-ray Surveyor. This finding is predicated upon assumptions outlined in the white paper and subsequent charge, namely that 1) major development of future large flagship missions under consideration are to follow the implementation phases of JWST and WFIRST; 2) NASA will partner with the European Space Agency on its L3 Gravitational Wave Surveyor; 3) the Inflation Probe be classified as a probe-class mission to be developed according to the 2010 Decadal Survey report. If these key assumptions were to change, this PAG finding would need to be re-evaluated. The PAGs find that there is strong community support for the second phase of this activity - maturation of the four proposed mission concepts via Science and Technology Definition Teams (STDTs). The PAGs find that there is strong consensus that all of the STDTs contain broad and interdisciplinary representation of the science community. Finally, the PAGs find that there is community support for a line of Probe-class missions within the Astrophysics mission portfolio (condensed).
  • Current post-processing techniques in high contrast imaging depend on some source of diversity between the exoplanet signal and the residual star light at that location. The two main techniques are angular differential imaging (ADI), which makes use of parallactic sky rotation to separate planet from star light, and spectral differential imaging (SDI), which makes use of differences in the spectrum of planet and star light and the wavelength dependence of the point spread function (PSF). Here we introduce our technique for exploiting another source of diversity: orbital motion. Given repeated observations of an exoplanetary system with sufficiently short orbital periods, the motion of the planets allows us to discriminate them from the PSF. In addition to using powerful PSF subtraction algorithms, such an observing strategy enables temporal filtering. Once an orbit is determined, the planet can be ``de-orbited'' to further increase the signal-to-noise ratio. We call this collection of techniques Orbital Differential Imaging (ODI). Here we present the motivation for this technique, present a noise model, and present results from simulations. We believe ODI will be an enabling technique for imaging Earth-like planets in the habitable zones of Sun-like stars with dedicated space missions.
  • Several mission concepts are being studied to directly image planets around nearby stars. It is commonly thought that directly imaging a potentially habitable exoplanet around a Sun-like star requires space telescopes with apertures of at least 1m. A notable exception to this is Alpha Centauri (A and B), which is an extreme outlier among FGKM stars in terms of apparent habitable zone size: the habitable zones are ~3x wider in apparent size than around any other FGKM star. This enables a ~30-45cm visible light space telescope equipped with a modern high performance coronagraph or starshade to resolve the habitable zone at high contrast and directly image any potentially habitable planet that may exist in the system. We presents a brief analysis of the astrophysical and technical challenges involved with direct imaging of Alpha Centauri with a small telescope and describe two new technologies that address some of the key technical challenges. In particular, the raw contrast requirements for such an instrument can be relaxed to 1e-8 if the mission spends 2 years collecting tens of thousands of images on the same target, enabling a factor of 500-1000 speckle suppression in post processing using a new technique called Orbital Difference Imaging (ODI). The raw light leak from both stars is controllable with a special wavefront control algorithm known as Multi-Star Wavefront Control (MSWC), which independently suppresses diffraction and aberrations from both stars using independent modes on the deformable mirror. We also show an example of a small coronagraphic mission concept to take advantage of this opportunity.
  • The scientific interest in directly image and identifying Earth-like planets within the Habitable Zone (HZ) around nearby stars is driving the design of specialized direct imaging mission such as ACESAT, EXO-C, EXO-S and AFTA-C. The inner edge of Alpha Cen A and B Habitable Zone is found at exceptionally large angular separations of 0.7 and 0.4 arcseconds respectively. This enables direct imaging of the system with a 0.3m class telescope. Contrast ratios in the order of 1e-10 are needed to image Earth-brightness planets. Low-resolution (5-band) spectra of all planets, will allow establishing the presence and amount of an atmosphere. This star system configuration is optimal for a specialized small, and stable space telescope, that can achieve high-contrast but has limited resolution. This paper describes an innovative instrument design and a mission concept based on a full Silicon Carbide off-axis telescope, which has a Phase Induce Amplitude Apodization coronagraph embedded in the telescope. This architecture maximizes stability and throughput. A Multi-Star Wave Front algorithm is implemented to drive a deformable mirror controlling simultaneously diffracted light from the on-axis and binary companion star. The instrument has a Focal Plane Occulter to reject starlight into a high-precision pointing control camera. Finally we utilize a Orbital Differential Imaging (ODI) post-processing method that takes advantage of a highly stable environment (Earth-trailing orbit) and a continuous sequence of images spanning 2 years, to reduce the final noise floor in post processing to 2e-11 levels, enabling high confidence and at least 90 percent completeness detections of Earth-like planets.
  • Direct imaging of extra-solar planets is now a reality, especially with the deployment and commissioning of the first generation of specialized ground-based instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager and SPHERE. These systems will allow detection of Jupiter-like planets $10^7$ times fainter than their host star. Obtaining this contrast level and beyond requires the combination of a coronagraph to suppress light coming from the host star and a wavefront control system including a deformable mirror (DM) to remove residual starlight (speckles) created by the imperfections of telescope. However, all these current and future systems focus on detecting faint planets around single host stars, while several targets or planet candidates are located around nearby binary stars such as our neighboring star Alpha Centauri. Here, we present a method to simultaneously correct aberrations and diffraction of light coming from the target star as well as its companion star in order to reveal planets orbiting the target star. This method works even if the companion star is outside the control region of the DM (beyond its half-Nyquist frequency), by taking advantage of aliasing effects.
  • Extra-solar planets direct imaging is now a reality with the deployment and commissioning of the first generation of specialized ground-based instruments (GPI, SPHERE, P1640 and SCExAO). These systems allow of planets $ 10 ^ 7 $ times fainter than their host star. For space-based missions (EXCEDE, EXO-C, EXO-S, WFIRST), various teams have demonstrated laboratory contrasts reaching $ 10 ^ { -10 } $ within a few diffraction limits from the star. However, all of these current and future systems are designed to detect faint planets around a single host star or unresolved multiples, while most non M-dwarf stars such as Alpha Centauri belong to multi-star systems. Direct imaging around binaries/multiple systems at a level of contrast allowing Earth-like planet detection is challenging because the region of interest is contaminated by the hosts star companion as well as the host Generally, the light leakage is caused by both diffraction and aberrations in the system. Moreover, the region of interest usually falls outside the correcting zone of the deformable mirror (DM) for the companion. Until now, it has been thought that removing the light of a companion star is too challenging, leading to the exclusion of binary systems from target lists of direct imaging coronographic missions. In this paper, we will show different new techniques for high-contrast imaging of planets around multi-star systems and detail the Super-Nyquist Wavefront Control (SNWC) method, which allows to control wavefront errors beyond nominal control region of the DM. Using the SNWC we reached contrasts around $ 5 \times 10 ^ { -9 } $ in a 10% bandwidth.
  • This paper is the third in the series on the technology development for the EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer) mission concept, which in 2011 was selected by NASA's Explorer program for technology development (Category III). EXCEDE is a 0.7m space telescope concept designed to achieve raw contrasts of 1e6 at an inner working angle of 1.2 l/D and 1e7 at 2 l/D and beyond. This will allow it to directly detect and spatially resolve low surface brightness circumstellar debris disks as well as image giant planets as close as in the habitable zones of their host stars. In addition to doing fundamental science on debris disks, EXCEDE will also serve as a technological and scientific precursor for any future exo-Earth imaging mission. EXCEDE uses a Starlight Suppression System (SSS) based on the PIAA coronagraph, enabling aggressive performance. We report on our continuing progress of developing the SSS for EXCEDE, and in particular (a) the reconfiguration of our system into a more flight-like layout, with an upstream deformable mirror and an inverse PIAA system, as well as a LOWFS, and (b) testing this system in a vacuum chamber, including IWA, contrast, and stability performance. The results achieved so far are 2.9e-7 contrast between 1.2-2.0 l/D and 9.7e-8 contrast between 2.0-6.0 l/D in monochromatic light; as well as 1.4e-6 between 2.0-6.0 l/D in a 10% band, all with a PIAA coronagraph operating at an inner working angle of 1.2 l/D. This constitutes better contrast than EXCEDE requirements (in those regions) in monochromatic light, and progress towards requirements in broadband light. Even though this technology development is primarily targeted towards EXCEDE, it is also germane to any exoplanet direct imaging space-based telescopes because of the many challenges common to different coronagraph architectures and mission requirements.
  • For the technology development of the mission EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer) - a 0.7 m telescope equipped with a Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization Coronagraph (PIAA-C) and a 2000-element MEMS deformable mirror, capable of raw contrasts of 1e-6 at 1.2 lambda/D and 1e-7 above 2 lambda/D - we developed two test benches simulating its key components, one in air, the other in vacuum. To achieve this level of contrast, one of the main goals is to remove low-order aberrations, using a Low-Order WaveFront Sensor (LOWFS). We tested this key component, together with the coronagraph and the wavefront control, in air at NASA Ames Research Center and in vacuum at Lockheed Martin. The LOWFS, controlling tip/tilt modes in real time at 1~kHz, allowed us to reduce the disturbances in air to 1e-3 lambda/D rms, letting us achieve a contrast of 2.8e-7 between 1.2 and 2 lambda/D. Tests are currently being performed to achieve the same or a better level of correction in vacuum. With those results, and by comparing them to simulations, we are able to deduce its performances on different coronagraphs - different sizes of telescopes, inner working angles, contrasts, etc. - and therefore study its contribution beyond EXCEDE.
  • Direct imaging of extra-solar planets has now become a reality, especially with the deployment and commissioning of the first generation of specialized ground-based instruments such as the GPI, SPHERE, P1640 and SCExAO. These systems will allow detection of planets 1e7 times fainter than their host star. For space-based missions, such as EXCEDE, EXO-C, EXO-S, WFIRST-AFTA, different teams have shown in laboratories contrasts reaching 1e-10 within a few diffraction limits from the star using a combination of a coronagraph to suppress light coming from the host star and a wavefront control system. These demonstrations use a deformable mirror (DM) to remove residual starlight (speckles) created by the imperfections of telescope. However, all these current and future systems focus on detecting faint planets around a single host star or unresolved binaries/multiples, while several targets or planet candidates are located around nearby binary stars such as our neighbor star Alpha Centauri. Until now, it has been thought that removing the light of a companion star is impossible with the current technology, excluding binary star systems from target lists of direct imaging missions. Direct imaging around binaries or multiples systems at a level of contrast allowing Earth-like planets detection is challenging because the region of interest, where a dark zone is essential, is contaminated by the light coming from the host star's companion. We propose a method to simultaneously correct aberration sand diffraction of light coming from the target star. This method works even if the companion star is outside the control region of the DM (beyond its half-Nyquist frequency), by taking advantage of aliasing effects.
  • We discuss scientific, technical and programmatic issues related to the use of an NRO 2.4m telescope for the WFIRST initiative of the 2010 Decadal Survey. We show that this implementation of WFIRST, which we call "NEW WFIRST," would achieve the goals of the NWNH Decadal Survey for the WFIRST core programs of Dark Energy and Microlensing Planet Finding, with the crucial benefit of deeper and/or wider near-IR surveys for GO science and a potentially Hubble-like Guest Observer program. NEW WFIRST could also include a coronagraphic imager for direct detection of dust disks and planets around neighboring stars, a high-priority science and technology precursor for future ambitious programs to image Earth-like planets around neighboring stars.