• Dozens of habitable zone, approximately earth-sized exoplanets are known today. An emerging frontier of exoplanet studies is identifying which of these habitable zone, small planets are actually habitable (have all necessary conditions for life) and, of those, which are earth-like. Many parameters and processes influence habitability, ranging from the orbit through detailed composition including volatiles and organics, to the presence of geological activity and plate tectonics. While some properties will soon be directly observable, others cannot be probed by remote sensing for the foreseeable future. Thus, statistical understanding of planetary systems' formation and evolution is a key supplement to the direct measurements of planet properties. Probabilistically assessing parameters we cannot directly measure is essential to reliably assess habitability, to prioritizing habitable-zone planets for follow-up, and for interpreting possible biosignatures.
  • The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is one of four mission concepts currently being studied by NASA in preparation for the Astrophysics 2020 Decadal Survey. With active cooling (~4 K), OST will be sensitive in mid- to far-IR wavelengths, using imaging and spectroscopy to probe the furthest reaches of our galaxies, trace the path of water through star and planet formation, and place thermochemical constraints on the atmospheres of exoplanets ranging in size from Jupiter to Earth. This contribution to the Exoplanet Science Strategy committee discusses the significant advancements that the OST Mid-Infrared Imager, Spectrometer, and Coronagraph (MISC) instrument can make in studying cool planetary atmospheres. We particularly focus on the atmospheres of transiting rocky planets in the habitable zones of mid-to-late M stars. We discuss how OST thermal infrared observations can significantly enhance our understanding of the temperature structure and molecular abundances of biologically interesting gases on these worlds, including O3, CH4, H2O, and CO2.
  • We report the first detection and high angular resolution (1.8" $\times$ 1.1") imaging of acetic acid (CH$_3$COOH) and gGg$^{\prime}$--ethylene glycol (gGg$^{\prime}$(CH$_2$OH)$_2$) towards the Orion Kleinmann--Low nebula. The observations were carried out at $\sim$1.3mm with ALMA during the Cycle~2. A notable result is that the spatial distribution of the acetic acid and ethylene glycol emission differs from that of the other O-bearing molecules within Orion-KL. Indeed, while the typical emission of O-bearing species harbors a morphology associated with a "V-shape" linking the Hot Core region to the Compact Ridge (with an extension towards the BN object), that of acetic acid and ethylene glycol mainly peaks at about 2" southwest from the hot core region (near sources I and n). We find that the measured CH$_3$COOH:aGg$^{\prime}$(CH$_2$OH)$_2$ and CH$_3$COOH:gGg$^{\prime}$(CH$_2$OH)$_2$ ratios differ from the ones measured towards the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293--2422 by more than one order of magnitude. Our best hypothesis to explain these findings is that CH$_3$COOH, aGg$^{\prime}$(CH$_2$OH)$_2$ and gGg$^{\prime}$(CH$_2$OH)$_2$ are formed on the icy-surface of grains and then released into the gas-phase, via co-desorption with water, due to a bullet of matter ejected during the explosive event that occurred in the heart of the Nebula about 500-700 years ago.
  • We report the observation and physical characterization of the possible dwarf planet \UZ\ ("DeeDee"), a dynamically detached trans-Neptunian object discovered at 92 AU. This object is currently the second-most distant known trans-Neptunian object with reported orbital elements, surpassed in distance only by the dwarf planet Eris. The object was discovered with an $r$-band magnitude of 23.0 in data collected by the Dark Energy Survey between 2014 and 2016. Its 1140-year orbit has $(a,e,i) = (109~\mathrm{AU}, 0.65, 26.8^{\circ})$. It will reach its perihelion distance of 38 AU in the year 2142. Integrations of its orbit show it to be dynamically stable on Gyr timescales, with only weak interactions with Neptune. We have performed followup observations with ALMA, using 3 hours of on-source integration time to measure the object's thermal emission in the Rayleigh-Jeans tail. The signal is detected at 7$\sigma$ significance, from which we determine a $V$-band albedo of $13.1^{+3.3}_{-2.4}\mathrm{(stat)}^{+2.0}_{-1.4}\mathrm{(sys)}$ percent and a diameter of $635^{+57}_{-61}\mathrm{(stat)}^{+32}_{-39}\mathrm{(sys)}$~km, assuming a spherical body with uniform surface properties.
  • Many aspects of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) instrument are still unknown due to its young age. One such aspect is the true nature of the primary beam of each baseline, and how changes to the individual primary beams affect astronomical observations when said changes are ignored during imaging. This paper aims to create a more thorough understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of ALMA through realistic modeling of the primary beams and simulated observations, which in turn can inform the user of the necessity of implementing more computationally costly algorithms, such as A-Projection, and when simpler, quicker algorithms will suffice. We quantify our results by examining the dynamic range of each observation, along with the ability to reconstruct the Stokes I amplitude of the test sources. These tests conclude that for dynamic ranges of less than 1000, for point sources and sources much smaller than the main lobe of the primary beam, the accuracy of the primary beam model beyond the physical size of the aperture simply doesn't matter. In observations of large extended sources, deconvolution errors dominate the reconstructed images and the individual primary beam errors were indistinguishable from each other.
  • We report the first high angular resolution imaging (3.4\arcsec $\times$ 3.0\arcsec) of deuterated formaldehyde (HDCO) toward Orion--KL, carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). We find that the spatial distribution of the formaldehyde emission systematically differs from that of methanol: while methanol is found towards the inner part of the region, HDCO is found in colder gas that wraps around the methanol emission on four sides. The HDCO/H$_2$CO ratios are determined to be 0.003--0.009 within the region, up to an order of magnitude higher than the D/H measured for methanol. These findings strengthen the previously suggested hypothesis that there are differences in the chemical pathways leading to HDCO (via deuterated gas phase chemistry) and deuterated methanol (through conversion of formaldehyde into methanol on the surface of icy grain mantles).
  • We have surveyed a sample of massive star-forming regions located over a range of distances from the Galactic centre for methyl formate, HCOOCH$_{3}$, and its isotopologues H$^{13}$COOCH$_{3}$ and HCOO$^{13}$CH$_{3}$. The observations were carried out with the APEX telescope in the frequency range 283.4--287.4~GHz. Based on the APEX observations, we report tentative detections of the $^{13}$C-methyl formate isotopologue HCOO$^{13}$CH$_{3}$ towards the following four massive star-forming regions: Sgr~B2(N-LMH), NGC~6334~IRS~1, W51 e2 and G19.61-0.23. In addition, we have used the 1~mm ALMA science verification observations of Orion-KL and confirm the detection of the $^{13}$C-methyl formate species in Orion-KL and image its spatial distribution. Our analysis shows that the $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C isotope ratio in methyl formate toward Orion-KL Compact Ridge and Hot Core-SW components (68.4$\pm$10.1 and 71.4$\pm$7.8, respectively) are, for both the $^{13}$C-methyl formate isotopologues, commensurate with the average $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratio of CO derived toward Orion-KL. Likewise, regarding the other sources, our results are consistent with the $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C in CO. We also report the spectroscopic characterization, which includes a complete partition function, of the complex H$^{13}$COOCH$_{3}$ and HCOO$^{13}$CH$_{3}$ species. New spectroscopic data for both isotopomers H$^{13}$COOCH$_{3}$ and HCOO$^{13}$CH$_{3}$, presented in this study, has made it possible to measure this fundamentally important isotope ratio in a large organic molecule for the first time.
  • We report observations of molecular oxygen (O$_2$) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km/s with line widths 3 km/s; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O$_2$ emission is 9" (6e16 cm) in size, and is located close to the H2 Peak 1position (where vibrationally-excited H$_2$ emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23" away. The peak O2 column density is 1.1e18/cm2. The line velocity is close to that of 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line-of-sight. The enhanced O$_2$ abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C-shock through a clump with preshock density 2e4/cm3, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O$_2$ can explain the emission from the source if its line of sight dimension is ~10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O$_2$ emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.
  • The far-ultraviolet (FUV; 912--1700 \AA) radiation field from accreting central stars in Classical T Tauri systems influences the disk chemistry during the period of giant planet formation. Previous efforts to measure the true stellar+accretion-generated FUV luminosity (both hot gas emission lines and continua) have been complicated by a combination of low-sensitivity and/or low-spectral resolution and did not include the contribution from the bright Ly$\alpha$ emission line. In this work, we present a high-resolution spectroscopic study of the FUV radiation fields of 16 T Tauri stars whose dust disks display a range of evolutionary states. We include reconstructed Ly$\alpha$ line profiles and remove atomic and molecular disk emission (from H$_{2}$ and CO fluorescence) to provide robust measurements of both the FUV continuum and hot gas lines (e.g., Ly$\alpha$, \ion{N}{5}, \ion{C}{4}, \ion{He}{2}) for an appreciable sample of T Tauri stars for the first time. We find that the flux of the typical Classical T Tauri Star FUV radiation field at 1 AU from the central star is $\sim$ 10$^{7}$ times the average interstellar radiation field. The Ly$\alpha$ emission line contributes an average of 88% of the total FUV flux, with the FUV continuum accounting for an average of 8%. Both the FUV continuum and Ly$\alpha$ flux are strongly correlated with \ion{C}{4} flux, suggesting that accretion processes dominate the production of both of these components. On average, only $\sim$ 0.5% of the total FUV flux is emitted between the Lyman limit (912 \AA) and the H$_{2}$ (0 -- 0) absorption band at 1110 \AA. The total and component-level high-resolution radiation fields are made publicly available in machine-readable format.
  • According to traditional gas-phase chemical models, O2 should be abundant in molecular clouds, but until recently, attempts to detect interstellar O2 line emission with ground- and space-based observatories have failed. Following the multi-line detections of O2 with low abundances in the Orion and rho Oph A molecular clouds with Herschel, it is important to investigate other environments, and we here quantify the O2 abundance near a solar-mass protostar. Observations of O2, at 487 GHz toward a deeply embedded low-mass Class 0 protostar, NGC 1333-IRAS 4A, are presented, using the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. Complementary data of the chemically related NO and CO molecules are obtained as well. The high spectral resolution data are analysed using radiative transfer models to infer column densities and abundances, and are tested directly against full gas-grain chemical models. The deep HIFI spectrum fails to show O2 at the velocity of the dense protostellar envelope, implying one of the lowest abundance upper limits of O2/H2 at <6x10^-9 (3 sigma). However, a tentative (4.5 sigma) detection of O2 is seen at the velocity of the surrounding NGC 1333 molecular cloud, shifted by 1 km/s relative to the protostar. For the protostellar envelope, pure gas-phase models and gas-grain chemical models require a long pre-collapse phase (~0.7-1x10^6 years), during which atomic and molecular oxygen are frozen out onto dust grains and fully converted to H2O, to avoid overproduction of O2 in the dense envelope. The same model also reproduces the limits on the chemically related NO molecule. The tentative detection of O2 in the surrounding cloud is consistent with a low-density PDR model with small changes in reaction rates. The low O2 abundance in the collapsing envelope around a low-mass protostar suggests that the gas and ice entering protoplanetary disks is very poor in O2.
  • Planets form in the disks around young stars. Their formation efficiency and composition are intimately linked to the protoplanetary disk locations of "snow lines" of abundant volatiles. We present chemical imaging of the CO snow line in the disk around TW Hya, an analog of the solar nebula, using high spatial and spectral resolution Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of N2H+, a reactive ion present in large abundance only where CO is frozen out. The N2H+ emission is distributed in a large ring, with an inner radius that matches CO snow line model predictions. The extracted CO snow line radius of ~ 30 AU helps to assess models of the formation dynamics of the Solar System, when combined with measurements of the bulk composition of planets and comets.
  • For Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), the resonance lines of N V, Si IV, and C IV, as well as the He II 1640 A line, act as diagnostics of the accretion process. Here we assemble a large high-resolution dataset of these lines in CTTSs and Weak T Tauri Stars (WTTSs). We present data for 35 stars: one Herbig Ae star, 28 CTTSs, and 6 WTTSs. We decompose the C IV and He II lines into broad and narrow Gaussian components (BC & NC). The most common (50 %) C IV line morphology in CTTSs is that of a low-velocity NC together with a redshifted BC. The velocity centroids of the BCs and NCs are such that V_BC > 4 * V_NC, consistent with the predictions of the accretion shock model, in at most 12 out of 22 CTTSs. We do not find evidence of the post-shock becoming buried in the stellar photosphere due to the pressure of the accretion flow. The He II CTTSs lines are generally symmetric and narrow, less redshifted than the CTTSs C IV lines, by ~10 km/sec. The flux in the BC of the He II line is small compared to that of the C IV line, consistent with models of the pre-shock column emission. The observations are consistent with the presence of multiple accretion columns with different densities or with accretion models that predict a slow-moving, low-density region in the periphery of the accretion column. For HN Tau A and RW Aur A, most of the C IV line is blueshifted suggesting that the C IV emission is produced by shocks within outflow jets. In our sample, the Herbig Ae star DX Cha is the only object for which we find a P-Cygni profile in the C IV line, which argues for the presence of a hot (10^5 K) wind. For the overall sample, the Si IV and N V line luminosities are correlated with the C IV line luminosities, although the relationship between Si IV and C IV shows large scatter about a linear relationship and suggests that TW Hya, V4046 Sgr, AA Tau, DF Tau, GM Aur, and V1190 Sco are silicon-poor.
  • Far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation plays an important role in determining chemical abundances in protoplanetary disks. HI Lyman alpha is suspected to be the dominant component of the FUV emission from Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), but is difficult to measure directly due to circumstellar and interstellar HI absorption. To better characterize the intrinsic Lyman alpha radiation, we present FUV spectra of 14 CTTSs taken with the Hubble Space Telescope COS and STIS instruments. H2 fluorescence, commonly seen in the spectra of CTTSs, is excited by Lyman alpha photons, providing an indirect measure of the Lyman alpha flux incident upon the warm disk surface. We use observed H2 progression fluxes to reconstruct the CTTS Lyman alpha profiles. The Lyman alpha flux correlates with total measured FUV flux, in agreement with an accretion-related source of FUV emission. With a geometry-independent analysis, we confirm that in accreting T Tauri systems Lyman alpha radiation dominates the FUV flux (~1150 - 1700 Angstroms). In the systems surveyed this one line comprises 70 - 90 % of the total FUV flux.
  • We present a far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectral atlas consisting of spectra of 91 pre-main sequence stars. Most stars in this sample were observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the \emph{Hubble Space Telescope} (\emph{HST}). We find strong correlations among the \ion{O}{1} $\lambda$1304 triplet, %\ion{C}{2} $\lambda$1335, the \ion{Si}{4} $\lambda\lambda$1394/1403 doublet, the \ion{C}{4} $\lambda$1549 doublet, and the \ion{He}{2} $\lambda$1640 line luminosities. For classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), we also find strong correlations between these lines and the accretion luminosity, suggesting that these lines form in processes related to accretion. These FUV line fluxes and X-ray luminosity correlate loosely with large scatters. The FUV emission also correlates well with H$\alpha$, H$\beta$, and \ion{Ca}{2} K line luminosities. These correlations between FUV and optical diagostics can be used to obtain rough estimates of FUV line fluxes from optical observations. Molecular hydrogen (H$_{2}$) emission is generally present in the spectra of actively accreting CTTSs but not the weak-lined T Tauri stars (WTTSs) that are not accreting. The presence of H$_2$ emission in the spectrum of HD 98800 N suggests that the disk should be classified as actively accreting rather than a debris disk. The spectra in the atlas are available at http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/ttauriatlas.
  • Young stars surrounded by disks with very low mass accretion rates are likely in the final stages of inner disk evolution and therefore particularly interesting to study. We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of the ~5-9 Myr old stars RECX-1 and RECX-11, obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), as well as optical and near infrared spectroscopic observations. The two stars have similar levels of near UV emission, although spectroscopic evidence indicates that RECX-11 is accreting and RECX-1 is not. The line profiles of Halpha and He I 10830 in RECX-11 show both broad and narrow redshifted absorption components that vary with time, revealing the complexity of the accretion flows. We show that accretion indicators commonly used to measure mass accretion rates, e.g. U band excess luminosity or the Ca II triplet line luminosity are unreliable for low accretors, at least in the middle K spectral range. Using RECX-1 as a template for the intrinsic level of photospheric and chromospheric emission, we determine an upper limit of 3 x 10^-10 solar masses/ year for RECX-11. At this low accretion rate, recent photoevaporation models predict that an inner hole should have developed in the disk. However, the spectral energy distribution of RECX-11 shows fluxes comparable to the median of Taurus in the near infrared, indicating that substantial dust remains. Fluorescent H_2 emission lines formed in the innermost disk are observed in RECX-11, showing that gas is present in the inner disk, along with the dust.
  • We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O2) in emission from the H2 Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s-1 to 12 km s-1 and widths of 3 km s-1. The beam-averaged column density is N(O2) = 6.5\times1016 cm-2, and assuming that the source has an equal beam filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19"), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O2 relative to H2 is 0.3 - 7.3\times10-6. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a ~ 5" diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is ~ 10 M\odot and the dust temperature is \geq 150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O2 abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T \geq 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O2. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature \geq 180 K. The inferred O2 column density \simeq 5\times1018 cm-2 can be produced in Peak A, having N(H2) \simeq 4\times1024 cm-2. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10 to 15 km s-1) C-shock, which can produce N(O2) up to 1017 cm-2.
  • We present Very Large Array observations of NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) in a sample of six infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) with distances from 2 to 5 kpc. We find that ammonia serves as an excellent tracer of dense gas in IRDCs, showing no evidence of depletion, and the average abundance in these clouds is 8.1 x 10^-7 relative to H2. Our sample consists of four IRDCs with 24 micron embedded protostars and two that appear starless. We calculate the kinetic temperature of the gas in IRDCs and find no significant difference between starless and star-forming IRDCs. We find that the bulk of the gas is between 8 and 13 K, indicating that any embedded or nearby stars or clusters do not affect the gas temperature dramatically. Though IRDCs have temperatures and volume densities on par with local star formation regions of lower mass, they consist of much more mass which induces very high internal pressures. In order for IRDCs to survive as coherent structures, the internal pressure must be balanced by a confining pressure provided by the high concentration of molecular clouds in the spiral arm in which they reside. The high molecular concentration and pressure is roughly consistent with gas dynamics of a bar galaxy.
  • We study the role resonant scattering plays in the transport of Lyman-alpha photons in accreting protoplanetary disk systems subject to varying degrees of dust settling. While the intrinsic stellar FUV spectrum of accreting T Tauri systems may already be dominated by a strong, broad Lyman-alpha line (~80% of the FUV luminosity), we find that resonant scattering further enhances the Lyman-alpha density in the deep molecular layers of the disk. Lyman-alpha is scattered downwards efficiently by the photodissociated atomic hydrogen layer that exists above the molecular disk. In contrast, FUV-continuum photons pass unimpeded through the photodissociation layer, and (forward-)scatter inefficiently off dust grains. Using detailed, adaptive grid Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations we show that the resulting Lyman-alpha/FUV-continuum photon density ratio is strongly stratified; FUV-continuum dominated in the photodissociation layer, and Lyman-alpha dominated field in the molecular disk. The enhancement is greatest in the interior of the disk (r~1AU) but is also observed in the outer disk (r~100AU). The majority of the total disk mass is shown to be increasingly Lyman-alpha dominated as dust settles towards the midplane.
  • We provide simple polynomial fits to the X-ray photoelectric cross-sections (0.03 < E < 10keV) for mixtures of gas and dust found in protoplanetary disks. Using the solar elemental abundances of Asplund et al. (2009) we treat the gas and dust components separately, facilitating the further exploration evolutionary processes such as grain settling and gain growth. We find that blanketing due to advanced grain-growth (a_max > 1 micron) can reduce the X-ray opacity of dust appreciably at E_X ~ 1keV, coincident with the peak of typical T Tauri X-ray spectra. However, the reduction of dust opacity by dust settling, which is known to occur in protoplanetary disks, is probably a more significant effect. The absorption of 1-10keV X-rays is dominated by gas opacity once the dust abundance has been reduced to about 1% of its diffuse interstellar value. The gas disk establishes a floor to the opacity at which point X-ray transport becomes insensitive to further dust evolution. Our choice of fitting function follows that of Morrison & McCammon (1983), providing a degree of backward-compatibility.
  • We exploit the high sensitivity and moderate spectral resolution of the $HST$-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph to detect far-ultraviolet spectral features of carbon monoxide (CO) present in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks for the first time. We present spectra of the classical T Tauri stars HN Tau, RECX-11, and V4046 Sgr, representative of a range of CO radiative processes. HN Tau shows CO bands in absorption against the accretion continuum. We measure a CO column density and rotational excitation temperature of N(CO) = 2 +/- 1 $\times$ 10$^{17}$ cm$^{-2}$ and T_rot(CO) 500 +/- 200 K for the absorbing gas. We also detect CO A-X band emission in RECX-11 and V4046 Sgr, excited by ultraviolet line photons, predominantly HI LyA. All three objects show emission from CO bands at $\lambda$ $>$ 1560 \AA, which may be excited by a combination of UV photons and collisions with non-thermal electrons. In previous observations these emission processes were not accounted for due to blending with emission from the accretion shock, collisionally excited H$_{2}$, and photo-excited H2; all of which appeared as a "continuum" whose components could not be separated. The CO emission spectrum is strongly dependent upon the shape of the incident stellar LyA emission profile. We find CO parameters in the range: N(CO) 10$^{18-19}$ cm$^{-2}$, T_{rot}(CO) > 300 K for the LyA-pumped emission. We combine these results with recent work on photo- and collisionally-excited H$_{2}$ emission, concluding that the observations of ultraviolet-emitting CO and H2 are consistent with a common spatial origin. We suggest that the CO/H2 ratio in the inner disk is ~1, a transition between the much lower interstellar value and the higher value observed in solar system comets today, a result that will require future observational and theoretical study to confirm.
  • We present new X-ray and Far Ultraviolet (FUV) observations of T Tauri stars covering the age range 1 to 10 Myr. Our goals are to observationally constrain the intensity of radiation fields responsible for evaporating gas from the circumstellar disk and to assess the feasibility of current photoevaporation models, focusing on X-ray and UV radiation. We greatly increase the number of 7-10 Myr old T Tauri stars observed in the X-rays by including observations of the well populated 25 Ori aggregate in the Orion OB1a subassociation. With these new 7-10 Myr objects, we confirm that X-ray emission remains constant from 1-10 Myr. We also show, for the first time, observational evidence for the evolution of FUV radiation fields with a sample of 56 accreting and non-accreting young stars spanning 1 Myr to 1 Gyr. We find that the FUV emission decreases on timescales consistent with the decline of accretion in classical T Tauri stars until reaching the chromospheric level in weak T Tauri stars and debris disks. Overall, we find that the observed strength of high energy radiation is consistent with that required by photoevaporation models to dissipate the disks in timescales of approximately 10 Myr. Finally, we find that the high energy fields that affect gas evolution are not similarly affecting dust evolution; in particular, we find that disks with inner clearings, the transitional disks, have similar levels of FUV emission as full disks.
  • Extinction maps at 8 micron from the Spitzer Space Telescope show that many Class 0 protostars exhibit complex, irregular, and on-axisymmetric structure within the densest regions of their dusty envelopes. Many of the systems have highly irregular and on-axisymmetric morphologies on scales $\sim$1000 AU, with a quarter of the sample exhibiting filamentary or flattened dense structures. Complex envelope structure is observed in regions spatially distinct from outflow cavities, and the densest structures often show no systematic alignment perpendicular to the cavities. We suggest that the observed envelope complexity is the result of collapse from protostellar cores with initially non-equilibrium structures. The striking non-axisymmetry in many envelopes could provide favorable conditions for the formation of binary systems. We then show that the kinematics around L1165 as probed with N2H+ are indicative of asymmetric infall; the velocity gradient is not perpendicular to the outflow.
  • We analyze the far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra of 33 classical T Tauri stars (CTTS), including 20 new spectra obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys Solar Blind Channel (ACS/SBC) on the Hubble Space Telescope. Of the sources, 28 are in the ~1 Myr old Taurus-Auriga complex or Orion Molecular Cloud, 4 in the 8-10 Myr old Orion OB1a complex and one, TW Hya, in the 10 Myr old TW Hydrae Association. We also obtained FUV ACS/SBC spectra of 10 non-accreting sources surrounded by debris disks with ages between 10 and 125 Myr. We use a feature in the FUV spectra due mostly to electron impact excitation of \h2 to study the evolution of the gas in the inner disk. We find that the \h2 feature is absent in non-accreting sources, but is detected in the spectra of CTTS and correlates with accretion luminosity. Since all young stars have active chromospheres which produce strong X-ray and UV emission capable of exciting \h2 in the disk, the fact that the non-accreting sources show no \h2 emission implies that the \h2 gas in the inner disk has dissipated in the non-accreting sources, although dust (and possibly gas) remains at larger radii. Using the flux at 1600 {\AA}, we estimate that the column density of \h2 left in the inner regions of the debris disks in our sample is less than ~ 3x10^-6 g cm^-2, nine orders of magnitude below the surface density of the minimum mass solar nebula at 1 AU.
  • Using a source selection biased towards high mass star forming regions, we used a Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) code to calculate the H2 densities and CS column densities for a sample of Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) 8 micron infrared dark cores. Our average H2 density and CS column density were 1.14 x 10e6 cm-3 and 1.21 x 10e13 cm-2 respectively. In addition, we have calculated the Jeans mass and Virial mass for each core to get a better understanding of their gravitational stability. We found that core masses calculated from observations of N2H+ J = 1-0 and C18O J = 1-0 by Ragan et al. 2006 (Paper 1) were sufficient for collapse, though most regions are likely to form protoclusters. We have explored the star-forming properties of the molecular gas within our sample and find some diversity which extends the range of infrared dark clouds from very the massive clouds that will create large clusters, to clouds that are similar to some of our local counterparts (e.g. Serpens, Ophiuchus).
  • Most stars are born in rich young stellar clusters (YSCs) embedded in giant molecular clouds. The most massive stars live out their short lives there, profoundly influencing their natal environments by ionizing HII regions, inflating wind-blown bubbles, and soon exploding as supernovae. Thousands of lower-mass pre-main sequence stars accompany the massive stars, and the expanding HII regions paradoxically trigger new star formation as they destroy their natal clouds. While this schematic picture is established, our understanding of the complex astrophysical processes involved in clustered star formation have only just begun to be elucidated. The technologies are challenging, requiring both high spatial resolution and wide fields at wavelengths that penetrate obscuring molecular material and remove contaminating Galactic field stars. We outline several important projects for the coming decade: the IMFs and structures of YSCs; triggered star formation around YSC; the fate of OB winds; the stellar populations of Infrared Dark Clouds; the most massive star clusters in the Galaxy; tracing star formation throughout the Galactic Disk; the Galactic Center region and YSCs in the Magellanic Clouds. Programmatic recommendations include: developing a 30m-class adaptive optics infrared telescope; support for high-resolution and wide field X-ray telescopes; large-aperture sub-millimeter and far-infrared telescopes; multi-object infrared spectrographs; and both numerical and analytical theory.