• We present an original phenomenological model to describe the evolution of galaxy number counts, morphologies, and spectral energy distributions across a wide range of redshifts (0.2<z<15) and stellar masses [Log10 M/Msun >6]. Our model follows observed mass and luminosity functions of both star-forming and quiescent galaxies, and reproduces the redshift evolution of colors, sizes, star-formation and chemical properties of the observed galaxy population. Unlike other existing approaches, our model includes a self-consistent treatment of stellar and photoionized gas emission and dust attenuation based on the BEAGLE tool. The mock galaxy catalogs generated with our new model can be used to simulate and optimize extragalactic surveys with future facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and to enable critical assessments of analysis procedures, interpretation tools, and measurement systematics for both photometric and spectroscopic data. As a first application of this work, we make predictions for the upcoming JWST Advanced Deep Extragalactic Survey (JADES), a joint program of the JWST/NIRCam and NIRSpec Guaranteed Time Observations teams. We show that JADES will detect, with NIRCam imaging, thousands of galaxies at z>6, and tens at z>10 at m_AB<30 (5-sigma) within the 236 arcmin^2 of the survey. The JADES data will enable accurate constraints on the evolution of the UV luminosity function at z>8, and resolve the current debate about the rate of evolution of galaxies at z>8. Ready to use mock catalogs and software to generate new realizations are publicly available as the JAdes extraGalactic Ultradeep Artificial Realizations (JAGUAR) package.
  • We report fourteen and twenty-eight protocluster candidates at z=5.7 and 6.6 over 14 and 19 deg^2 areas, respectively, selected from 2,230 (259) Lya emitters (LAEs) photometrically (spectroscopically) identified with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) deep images (Keck, Subaru, and Magellan spectra and the literature data). Six out of the 42 protocluster candidates include 1-12 spectroscopically confirmed LAEs at redshifts up to z=6.574. By the comparisons with the cosmological Lya radiative transfer (RT) model reproducing LAEs with the reionization effects, we find that more than a half of these protocluster candidates are progenitors of the present-day clusters with a mass of > 10^14 M_sun. We then investigate the correlation between LAE overdensity delta and Lya rest-frame equivalent width EW_Lya^rest, because the cosmological Lya RT model suggests that a slope of EW_Lya^rest-delta relation is steepened towards the epoch of cosmic reionization (EoR), due to the existence of the ionized bubbles around galaxy overdensities easing the escape of Lya emission from the partly neutral intergalactic medium (IGM). The available HSC data suggest that the slope of the EW_Lya^rest-delta correlation does not evolve from the post-reionization epoch z=5.7 to the EoR z=6.6 beyond the moderately large statistical errors. There is a possibility that we would detect the evolution of the EW_Lya^rest - delta relation from z=5.7 to 7.3 by the upcoming HSC observations providing large samples of LAEs at z=6.6-7.3.
  • We report direct evidence of pre-processing of the galaxies residing in galaxy groups falling into galaxy clusters drawn from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS). 34 groups have been identified via their X-ray emission in the infall regions of 23 massive ($\rm \langle M_{200}\rangle = 10^{15}\,M_{\odot}$) clusters at $0.15<z<0.3$. Highly complete spectroscopic coverage combined with 24 $\rm\mu$m imaging from Spitzer allows us to make a consistent and robust selection of cluster and group members including star forming galaxies down to a stellar mass limit of $\rm M_{\star} = 2\times10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$. The fraction $\rm f_{SF}$ of star forming galaxies in infalling groups is lower and with a flatter trend with respect to clustercentric radius when compared to the rest of the cluster galaxy population. At $\rm R\approx1.3\,r_{200}$ the fraction of star forming galaxies in infalling groups is half that in the cluster galaxy population. This is direct evidence that star formation quenching is effective in galaxies already prior to them settling in the cluster potential, and that groups are favourable locations for this process.
  • We study a sample of 19 galaxy clusters in the redshift range $0.15<z<0.30$ with highly complete spectroscopic membership catalogues (to $K < K^{\ast}(\rm z)+1.5$) from the Arizona Cluster Redshift Survey (ACReS); individual weak-lensing masses and near-infrared data from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS); and optical photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We fit the scaling relations between total cluster luminosity in each of six bandpasses (${\it grizJK}$) and cluster mass, finding cluster luminosity to be a promising mass proxy with low intrinsic scatter $\sigma_{\ln L|M}$ of only $\sim 10-20$ per cent for all relations. At fixed overdensity radius, the intercept increases with wavelength, consistent with an old stellar population. The scatter and slope are consistent across all wavelengths, suggesting that cluster colour is not a function of mass. Comparing colour with indicators of the level of disturbance in the cluster, we find a narrower variety in the cluster colours of 'disturbed' clusters than of 'undisturbed' clusters. This trend is more pronounced with indicators sensitive to the initial stages of a cluster merger, e.g. the Dressler Schectman statistic. We interpret this as possible evidence that the total cluster star formation rate is 'standardised' in mergers, perhaps through a process such as a system-wide shock in the intracluster medium.
  • The James Webb Space Telescope near-infrared camera (JWST NIRCam) has two 2.'2 $\times$ 2.'2 fields of view that are capable of either imaging or spectroscopic observations. Either of two $R \sim 1500$ grisms with orthogonal dispersion directions can be used for slitless spectroscopy over $\lambda = 2.4 - 5.0$ $\mu$m in each module, and shorter wavelength observations of the same fields can be obtained simultaneously. We present the latest predicted grism sensitivities, saturation limits, resolving power, and wavelength coverage values based on component measurements, instrument tests, and end-to-end modeling. Short wavelength (0.6 -- 2.3 $\mu$m) imaging observations of the 2.4 -- 5.0 $\mu$m spectroscopic field can be performed in one of several different filter bands, either in-focus or defocused via weak lenses internal to NIRCam. Alternatively, the possibility of 1.0 -- 2.0 $\mu$m spectroscopy (simultaneously with 2.4 -- 5.0 $\mu$m) using dispersed Hartmann sensors (DHSs) is being explored. The grisms, weak lenses, and DHS elements were included in NIRCam primarily for wavefront sensing purposes, but all have significant science applications. Operational considerations including subarray sizes, and data volume limits are also discussed. Finally, we describe spectral simulation tools and illustrate potential scientific uses of the grisms by presenting simulated observations of deep extragalactic fields, galactic dark clouds, and transiting exoplanets.
  • We report the serendipitous discovery of HSC J142449-005322, a double source plane lens system in the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program. We dub the system Eye of Horus. The lens galaxy is a very massive early-type galaxy with stellar mass of ~7x10^11 Msun located at z_L=0.795. The system exhibits two arcs/rings with clearly different colors, including several knots. We have performed spectroscopic follow-up observations of the system with FIRE on Magellan. The outer ring is confirmed at z_S2=1.988 with multiple emission lines, while the inner arc and counterimage is confirmed at z_S1=1.302. This makes it the first double source plane system with spectroscopic redshifts of both sources. Interestingly, redshifts of two of the knots embedded in the outer ring are found to be offset by delta_z=0.002 from the other knots, suggesting that the outer ring consists of at least two distinct components in the source plane. We perform lens modeling with two independent codes and successfully reproduce the main features of the system. However, two of the lensed sources separated by ~0.7 arcsec cannot be reproduced by a smooth potential, and the addition of substructure to the lens potential is required to reproduce them. Higher-resolution imaging of the system will help decipher the origin of this lensing feature and potentially detect the substructure.
  • The far-infrared fine-structure line [CII] at 1900.5\,GHz is known to be one of the brightest cooling lines in local galaxies, and therefore it has been suggested to be an efficient tracer for star-formation in very high-redshift galaxies. However, recent results for galaxies at $z>6$ have yielded numerous non-detections in star-forming galaxies, except for quasars and submillimeter galaxies. We report the results of ALMA observations of two lensed, star-forming galaxies at $z = 6.029$ and $z=6.703$. The galaxy A383-5.1 (star formation rate [SFR] of 3.2 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ and magnification of $\mu = 11.4\pm1.9$) shows a line detection with $L_{\rm [CII]} = 8.9\times10^{6}$ L$_\odot$, making it the lowest $L_{\rm [CII]}$ detection at $z>6$. For MS0451-H (SFR = 0.4 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ and $\mu = 100\pm20$) we provide an upper limit of $L_{\rm [CII]} < 3\times10^{5}$ L$_\odot$, which is 1\,dex below the local SFR-$L_{\rm [CII]}$ relations. The results are consistent with predictions for low-metallicity galaxies at $z>6$, however, other effects could also play a role in terms of decreasing $L_{\rm [CII]}$. The detection of A383-5.1 is encouraging and suggests that detections are possible, but much fainter than initially predicted.
  • We present a study of stellar populations in a sample of spectroscopically-confirmed Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) and Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) at $5.7<z<7$. These galaxies have deep optical and infrared images from Subaru, $HST$, and $Spitzer$/IRAC. We focus on a subset of 27 galaxies with IRAC detections, and characterize their stellar populations utilizing galaxy synthesis models based on the multi-band data and secure redshifts. By incorporating nebular emission estimated from the observed Ly$\alpha$ flux, we are able to break the strong degeneracy of model spectra between young galaxies with prominent nebular emission and older galaxies with strong Balmer breaks. The results show that our galaxies cover a wide range of ages from several to a few hundred million years (Myr), and a wide range of stellar masses from $\sim10^8$ to $\sim10^{11}$ $M_{\odot}$. These galaxies can be roughly divided into an `old' subsample and a `young' subsample. The `old' subsample consists of galaxies older than 100 Myr, with stellar masses higher than $10^9$ $M_{\odot}$. The galaxies in the `young' subsample are younger than $\sim$30 Myr, with masses ranging between $\sim10^8$ and $\sim3\times10^9$ $M_{\odot}$. Both subsamples display a correlation between stellar mass and star-formation rate (SFR), but with very different normalizations. The average specific SFR (sSFR) of the `old' subsample is 3--4 Gyr$^{-1}$, consistent with previous studies of `normal' star-forming galaxies at $z\ge6$. The average sSFR of the `young' subsample is an order of magnitude higher, likely due to starburst activity. Our results also indicate little or no dust extinction in the majority of the galaxies, as already suggested by their steep rest-frame UV slopes. Finally, LAEs and LBGs with strong Ly$\alpha$ emission are indistinguishable in terms of age, stellar mass, and SFR.
  • We use deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the Frontier Fields to accurately measure the galaxy rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function (UV LF) in the redshift range $z \sim 6-8$. We combine observations in three lensing clusters A2744, MACS0416, MACS0717 and their associated parallels fields to select high-redshift dropout candidates. We use the latest lensing models to estimate the flux magnification and the effective survey volume in combination with completeness simulations performed in the source plane. We report the detection of 227 galaxy candidates at $z=6-7$ and 25 candidates at $z \sim 8$. While the total survey area is about 4 arcmin$^{2}$ in each parallel field, it drops to about 0.6 to 1 arcmin$^{2}$ in the cluster core fields because of the strong lensing. We compute the UV luminosity function at $z \sim 7$ using the combined galaxy sample and perform Monte Carlo simulations to determine the best fit Schechter parameters. We are able to reliably constrain the LF down to an absolute magnitude of $M_{UV}=-15.25$, which corresponds to 0.005$L^{\star}$. More importantly, we find that the faint-end slope remains steep down to this magnitude limit with $\alpha=-2.04_{-0.17}^{+0.13}$. Our results confirm the most recent results in deep blank fields but extend the LF measurements more than two magnitudes deeper. The UV LF at $z \sim 8$ is not very well constrained below $M_{UV}=-18$ due to the small number statistics and incompleteness uncertainties. To assess the contribution of galaxies to cosmic reionization we derive the UV luminosity density at $z\sim7$ by integrating the UV LF down to an observationally constrained limit of $M_{UV} = -15$. We show that our determination of Log($\rho_{UV}$)=$26.2\pm0.13$ (erg s$^{-1}$ Hz$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-3}$) can be sufficient to maintain the IGM ionized.
  • Two millimeter observations of the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster have detected a source that was consistent with the location of the lensed MACS1149-JD galaxy at z=9.6. A positive identification would have rendered this galaxy as the youngest dust forming galaxy in the universe. Follow up observation with the AzTEC 1.1 mm camera and the IRAM NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) at 1.3 mm have not confirmed this association. In this paper we show that the NOEMA observations associate the 2 mm source with [PCB2012] 2882 ([PCB2012] 2882 is the NED-searchable name for this source.), source number 2882 in the Hubble Space Telescope ( HST) Cluster Lensing and Supernova (CLASH) catalog of MACS J1149.6+2223. This source, hereafter referred to as CLASH 2882, is a gravitationally lensed spiral galaxy at z=0.99. We combine the GISMO 2 mm and NOEMA 1.3 mm fluxes with other (rest frame) UV to far-IR observations to construct the full spectral energy distribution (SED) of this galaxy, and derive its star formation history, and stellar and interstellar dust content. The current star formation rate of the galaxy is 54/mu Msun yr-1, and its dust mass is about 5 10^7/mu Msun, where mu is the lensing magnification factor for this source, which has a mean value of 2.7. The inferred dust mass is higher than the maximum dust mass that can be produced by core collapse supernovae (CCSN) and evolved AGB stars. As with many other star forming galaxies, most of the dust mass in CLASH 2882 must have been accreted in the dense phases of the ISM.
  • Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogs derived from the COSMOS survey and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z~0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to identify safely faint blue background galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. We therefore develop a pragmatic method to combine both sets of photometric redshifts to select a population of blue galaxies based purely on photometric analysis. This sample yields stacked weak-lensing results consistent with our previously published results based on red galaxies. We also show that the stacked clustercentric number density profile of these faint blue galaxies is consistent with expectations from consideration of the lens magnification signal of the clusters. Indeed, the observed number density of blue background galaxies changes by ~10-30 per cent across the radial range over which other surveys assume it to be flat.
  • Exploiting the power of gravitational lensing, the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program aims at observing six massive galaxy clusters to explore the distant Universe far beyond the depth limits of blank field surveys. Using the complete Hubble Space Telescope observations of the first HFF cluster Abell 2744, we report the detection of 50 galaxy candidates at $z \sim 7$ and eight candidates at $z \sim 8$ in a total survey area of 0.96 arcmin$^{2}$ in the source plane. Three of these galaxies are multiply-imaged by the lensing cluster. Using an updated model of the mass distribution in the cluster we were able to calculate the magnification factor and the effective survey volume for each galaxy in order to compute the ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function at both redshifts 7 and 8. Our new measurements extend the $z \sim 7$ UV LF down to an absolute magnitude of $M_{UV} \sim -15.5$. We find a characteristic magnitude of $M^{\star}_{UV}=-20.63^{+0.69}_{-0.56}$ mag and a faint-end slope $\alpha = -1.88^{+0.17}_{-0.20}$ close to previous determinations in blank fields. We show here for the first time that this slope remains steep down to very faint luminosities of 0.01$L^{\star}$. Although prone to large uncertainties, our results at $z \sim 8$ also seem to confirm a steep faint-end slope below 0.1$L^{\star}$. The HFF program is therefore providing an extremely efficient way to study the faintest galaxy populations at $z > 7$ that would otherwise be inaccessible with current instrumentation. The full sample of six galaxy clusters will provide yet better constraints on the build-up of galaxies at early epochs and their contribution to cosmic reionization.
  • We present ALMA observations of the [CII] line and far-infrared (FIR) continuum of a normally star-forming galaxy in the reionization epoch, the z=6.96 Ly-alpha emitter (LAE) IOK-1. Probing to sensitivities of sigma_line = 240 micro-Jy/beam (40 km/s channel) and sigma_cont = 21 micro-Jy/beam, we found the galaxy undetected in both [CII] and continuum. Comparison of UV - FIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of IOK-1, including our ALMA limit, with those of several types of local galaxies (including the effects of the cosmic microwave background, CMB, on the FIR continuum) suggests that IOK-1 is similar to local dwarf/irregular galaxies in SED shape rather than highly dusty/obscured galaxies. Moreover, our 3 sigma FIR continuum limit, corrected for CMB effects, implies intrinsic dust mass M_dust < 6.4 x 10^7 M_sun, FIR luminosity L_FIR < 3.7 x 10^{10} L_sun (42.5 - 122.5 micron), total IR luminosity L_IR < 5.7 x 10^{10} L_sun (8 - 1000 micron) and dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) < 10 M_sun/yr, if we assume that IOK-1 has a dust temperature and emissivity index typical of local dwarf galaxies. This SFR is 2.4 times lower than one estimated from the UV continuum, suggesting that < 29% of the star formation is obscured by dust. Meanwhile, our 3 sigma [CII] flux limit translates into [CII] luminosity, L_[CII] < 3.4 x 10^7 L_sun. Locations of IOK-1 and previously observed LAEs on the L_[CII] vs. SFR and L_[CII]/L_FIR vs. L_FIR diagrams imply that LAEs in the reionization epoch have significantly lower gas and dust enrichment than AGN-powered systems and starbursts at similar/lower redshifts, as well as local star-forming galaxies.
  • We present the first scaling relation between weak-lensing galaxy cluster mass, $M_{WL}$, and near-infrared luminosity, $L_K$. Our results are based on 17 clusters observed with wide-field instruments on Subaru, the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, the Mayall Telescope, and the MMT. We concentrate on the relation between projected 2D weak-lensing mass and spectroscopically confirmed luminosity within 1Mpc, modelled as $M_{WL} \propto L_{K}^b$, obtaining a power law slope of $b=0.83^{+0.27}_{-0.24}$ and an intrinsic scatter of $\sigma_{lnM_{WL}|L_{K}}=10^{+8}_{-5}\%$. Intrinsic scatter of ~10% is a consistent feature of our results regardless of how we modify our approach to measuring the relationship between mass and light. For example, deprojecting the mass and measuring both quantities within $r_{500}$, that is itself obtained from the lensing analysis, yields $\sigma_{lnM_{WL}|L_{K}}=10^{+7}_{-5}\%$ and $b=0.97^{+0.17}_{-0.17}$. We also find that selecting members based on their (J-K) colours instead of spectroscopic redshifts neither increases the scatter nor modifies the slope. Overall our results indicate that near-infrared luminosity measured on scales comparable with $r_{500}$ (typically 1Mpc for our sample) is a low scatter and relatively inexpensive proxy for weak-lensing mass. Near-infrared luminosity may therefore be a useful mass proxy for cluster cosmology experiments.
  • We present a high-precision mass model of the galaxy cluster MACSJ0416.1-2403, based on a strong-gravitational-lensing analysis of the recently acquired Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging data. Taking advantage of the unprecedented depth provided by HST/ACS observations in three passbands, we identify 51 new multiply imaged galaxies, quadrupling the previous census and bringing the grand total to 68, comprising 194 individual lensed images. Having selected a subset of the 57 most securely identified multiply imaged galaxies, we use the Lenstool software package to constrain a lens model comprised of two cluster-scale dark-matter halos and 98 galaxy-scale halos. Our best-fit model predicts image positions with an $RMS$ error of 0.68'', which constitutes an improvement of almost a factor of two over previous, pre-HFF models of this cluster. We find the total projected mass inside a 200~kpc aperture to be $(1.60\pm0.01)\times 10^{14}\ M_\odot$, a measurement that offers a three-fold improvement in precision, reaching the percent level for the first time in any cluster. Finally, we quantify the increase in precision of the derived gravitational magnification of high-redshift galaxies and find an improvement by a factor of $\sim$2.5 in the statistical uncertainty. Our findings impressively confirm that HFF imaging has indeed opened the domain of high-precision mass measurements for massive clusters of galaxies.
  • We report our analysis of MACS J0717.5+3745 using 140 and 268 GHz Bolocam data collected at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We detect extended Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect signal at high significance in both Bolocam bands, and we employ Herschel-SPIRE observations to subtract the signal from dusty background galaxies in the 268 GHz data. We constrain the two-band SZ surface brightness toward two of the sub-clusters of MACS J0717.5+3745: the main sub-cluster (named C), and a sub-cluster identified in spectroscopic optical data to have a line-of-sight velocity of +3200 km/s (named B). We determine the surface brightness in two separate ways: via fits of parametric models and via direct integration of the images. For both sub-clusters, we find consistent surface brightnesses from both analysis methods. We constrain spectral templates consisting of relativistically corrected thermal and kinetic SZ signals, using a jointly-derived electron temperature from Chandra and XMM-Newton under the assumption that each sub-cluster is isothermal. The data show no evidence for a kinetic SZ signal toward sub-cluster C, but they do indicate a significant kinetic SZ signal toward sub-cluster B. The model-derived surface brightnesses for sub-cluster B yield a best-fit line-of-sight velocity of v_z = +3450 +- 900 km/s, with (1 - Prob[v_z > 0]) = 1.3 x 10^-5 (4.2 sigma away from 0 for a Gaussian distribution). The directly integrated sub-cluster B SZ surface brightnesses provide a best-fit v_z = +2550 +- 1050 km/s, with (1 - Prob[v_z > 0]) = 2.2 x 10^-3 (2.9 sigma).
  • We present a detailed structural and morphological study of a large sample of spectroscopically-confirmed galaxies at z >= 6, using deep HST near-IR broad-band images and Subaru optical narrow-band images. The galaxy sample consists of 51 Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at z ~ 5.7, 6.5, and 7.0, and 16 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at 5.9 < z < 6.5. These galaxies exhibit a wide range of rest-frame UV continuum morphology in the HST images, from compact features to multiple component systems. The fraction of merging/interacting galaxies reaches 40% ~ 50% at the brightest end of M_1500 <= -20.5 mag. The intrinsic half-light radii r_{hl,in}, after correction for PSF broadening, are roughly between r_{hl,in} ~ 0.05" (0.3 kpc) and 0.3" (1.7 kpc) at M_1500 <= -19.5 mag. The median r_{hl,in} value is 0.16" (~0.9 kpc). This is consistent with the sizes of bright LAEs and LBGs at z >= 6 in previous studies. In addition, more luminous galaxies tend to have larger sizes, exhibiting a weak size-luminosity relation r_{hl,in} \propto L^{0.14} at M_1500 <= -19.5 mag. The slope of 0.14 is significantly flatter than those in fainter LBG samples. We discuss the morphology of z >= 6 galaxies with nonparametric methods, including the CAS system and the Gini and M_20 parameters, and demonstrate their validity through simulations. We search for extended Lyman-alpha emission halos around LAEs at z ~ 5.7 and 6.5, by stacking a number of narrow-band images. We do not find evidence of extended halos predicted by cosmological simulations. Such Lyman-alpha halos, if they exist, could be weaker than predicted. Finally, we investigate any positional misalignment between UV continuum and Lyman-alpha emission in LAEs. While the two positions are generally consistent, several merging galaxies show significant positional differences. This is likely caused by a disturbed ISM distribution due to merging activity.
  • We present deep HST near-IR and Spitzer mid-IR observations of a large sample of spectroscopically-confirmed galaxies at z >= 6. The sample consists of 51 Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at z ~ 5.7, 6.5, and 7.0, and 16 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at 5.9 < z < 6.5. The near-IR images were mostly obtained with WFC3 in the F125W and F160W bands, and the mid-IR images were obtained with IRAC in the 3.6um and 4.5um bands. Our galaxies also have deep optical imaging data from Subaru Suprime-Cam. We utilize the multi-band data and secure redshifts to derive their rest-frame UV properties. These galaxies have steep UV continuum slopes roughly between beta ~ -1.5 and -3.5, with an average value of beta ~ -2.3, slightly steeper than the slopes of LBGs in previous studies. The slope shows little dependence on UV continuum luminosity except for a few of the brightest galaxies. We find a statistically significant excess of galaxies with slopes around beta ~ -3, suggesting the existence of very young stellar populations with extremely low metallicity and dust content. Our galaxies have moderately strong rest-frame Lyman-alpha equivalent width (EW) in a range of ~10 to ~200 \AA. The star-formation rates are also moderate, from a few to a few tens solar masses per year. The LAEs and LBGs in this sample share many common properties, implying that LAEs represent a subset of LBGs with strong Lyman-alpha emission. Finally, the comparison of the UV luminosity functions between LAEs and LBGs suggests that there exists a substantial population of faint galaxies with weak Lyman-alpha emission (EW < 20 \AA) that could be the dominant contribution to the total ionizing flux at z >= 6.
  • We present deep spectroscopic observations of a Lyman-alpha emitter (LAE) candidate at z ~ 7.7 using the infrared spectrograph LUCI on the 2 x 8.4m Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The candidate is the brightest among the four z ~ 7.7 LAE candidates found in a narrow-band imaging survey by Krug et al. 2012. Our spectroscopic data include a total of 7.5 hours of integration with LBT/LUCI and are deep enough to significantly (3.2-4.9 sigma) detect the Lyman-alpha emission line of this candidate, based on its Lyman-alpha flux 1.2 x 10^{-17} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} estimated from the narrow-band photometry. However, we do not find any convincing signal at the expected position of its Lyman-alpha emission line, suggesting that this source is not an LAE at z ~ 7.7. The non-detection in this work, together with the previous studies of z ~ 7.7 LAEs, puts a strong constraint on the bright-end Lyman-alpha luminosity function (LF) at z ~ 7.7. We find a rapid evolution of the Lyman-alpha LF from z ~ 6.5 to 7.7: the upper limit of the z ~ 7.7 LF is more than 5 times lower than the z ~ 6.5 LF at the bright end (f > 1.0 x 10^{-17} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2}, or L > 6.9 x 10^{42} erg s^{-1}). This is likely caused by an increasing neutral fraction in the IGM that substantially attenuates Lyman-alpha emission at z ~ 7.7.
  • We have identified a very interesting Ly-alpha emitter, whose Ly-alpha emission line has an extremely large observed equivalent width of EW_0=436^{+422}_{-149}A, which corresponds to an extraordinarily large intrinsic rest-frame equivalent width of EW_0^{int}=872^{+844}_{-298}A after the average intergalactic absorption correction. The object was spectroscopically confirmed to be a real Ly-alpha emitter by its apparent asymmetric Ly-alpha line profile detected at z=6.538. The continuum emission of the object was definitely detected in our deep z'-band image; thus, its EW_0 was reliably determined. Follow-up deep near-infrared spectroscopy revealed emission lines of neither He II lambda1640 as an apparent signature of Population III, nor C IV lambda1549 as a proof of active nucleus. No detection of short-lived He II lambda1640 line is not necessarily inconsistent with the interpretation that the underlying stellar population of the object is dominated by Population III. We found that the observed extremely large EW_0 of the Ly-alpha emission and the upper limit on the EW_0 of the He II lambda1640 emission can be explained by population synthesis models favoring a very young age less than 2-4Myr and massive metal-poor (Z<10^{-5}) or even metal-free stars. The observed large EW_0 of Ly-alpha is hardly explained by Population I/II synthesis models with Z>10^{-3}. However, we cannot conclusively rule out the possibility that this object is composed of a normal stellar population with a clumpy dust distribution, which could enhance the Ly-alpha EW_0, though its significance is still unclear.
  • We searched for z=7.3 Lya emitters (LAEs) behind two lensing clusters, Abell 2390 and CL 0024, with the Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam and a narrowband NB1006 (FWHM ~ 21 nm centered at 1005 nm). We investigated if there exist objects consistent with the color of z=7.3 LAEs behind the clusters but could not detect any LAEs to the unlensed line limit F(Lya) ~ 6.9 x 10^{-18} erg/s/cm^2. Using several z=7 Lya luminosity functions (LFs) from the literature, we estimated and compared the expected detection numbers of z ~ 7 LAEs in lensing and blank field surveys in the case of using an 8m class ground based telescope. Given the steep bright-end slope of the LFs, when the detector field-of view (FOV) is comparable to the angular extent of a massive lensing cluster, imaging cluster(s) is more efficient in detecting z ~ 7 LAEs than imaging a blank field. However, the gain is expected to be modest, a factor of two at most and likely much less depending on the adopted LFs. The main advantage of lensing-cluster survey, therefore, remains to be the gain in depth and not necessarily in detection efficiency. For much larger detectors, the lensing effect becomes negligible and the efficiency of LAE detection is proportional to the instrumental FOV. We also inspected NB1006 images of three z ~ 7 z-dropouts previously detected in Abell 2390 and found that none of them are detected in NB1006. Two of them are consistent with predictions from the previous studies that they would be at lower redshifts. The other one has a photometric redshift of z ~ 7.3, and if it is at z=7.3, its unlensed Lya line flux would be very faint: F(Lya) < 4.4 x 10^{-18} erg/s/cm^2 (1 sigma upper limit) or rest frame equivalent width of W(Lya) < 26A. Its Lya emission might be attenuated by neutral hydrogen, as recent studies show that the fraction of Lyman break galaxies displaying strong Lya emission is lower at z ~ 7 than at z <~ 6.
  • We report the discovery of a protocluster at z~6 containing at least eight cluster member galaxies with spectroscopic confirmations in the wide-field image of the Subaru Deep Field (SDF). The overdensity of the protocluster is significant at the 6 sigma level, based on the surface number density of i'-dropout galaxies. The overdense region covers ~36 sq. arcmin, and includes 30 i'-dropout galaxies. Follow-up spectroscopy revealed that 15 of these are real z~6 galaxies (5.7 < z < 6.3). Eight of the 15 are clustering in a narrow redshift range centered at z=6.01, corresponding to a seven-fold increase in number density over the average in redshift space. We found no significant difference in the observed properties, such as Ly-alpha luminosities and UV continuum magnitudes, between the eight protocluster members and the seven non-members. The velocity dispersion of the eight protocluster members is 647 km/s, which is about three times higher than that predicted by the standard cold dark matter model. This discrepancy could be attributed to the distinguishing three-dimensional distribution of the eight protocluster members. We discuss two possible explanations for this discrepancy: either the protocluster is already mature, with old galaxies at the center, or it is still immature and composed of three subgroups merging to become a larger cluster. In either case, this concentration of z=6.01 galaxies in the SDF may be one of the first sites of formation of a galaxy cluster in the universe.
  • We have discovered a 2.5 Mpc (projected) long filament of infrared-bright galaxies connecting two of the three ~5x10^14 Msun clusters making up the RCS 2319+00 supercluster at z=0.9. The filament is revealed in a deep Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) map that shows 250-500um emission associated with a spectroscopically identified filament of galaxies spanning two X-ray bright cluster cores. We estimate that the total (8-1000um) infrared luminosity of the filament is Lir~5x10^12 Lsun, which, if due to star formation alone, corresponds to a total SFR 900 Msun/yr. We are witnessing the scene of the build-up of a >10^15 Msun cluster of galaxies, seen prior to the merging of three massive components, each of which already contains a population of red, passive galaxies that formed at z>2. The infrared filament demonstrates that significant stellar mass assembly is taking place in the moderate density, dynamically active circumcluster environments of the most massive clusters at high-redshift, and this activity is concomitant with the hierarchical build-up of large scale structure.
  • We present the analysis of Herschel SPIRE far-infrared (FIR) observations of the z = 2.515 lensed galaxy SMM J163554.2+661225. Combining new 250, 350, and 500 micron observations with existing data, we make an improved fit to the FIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of this galaxy. We find a total infrared (IR) luminosity of L(8--1000 micron) = 6.9 +/- 0.6x10^11 Lsol; a factor of 3 more precise over previous L_IR estimates for this galaxy, and one of the most accurate measurements for any galaxy at these redshifts. This FIR luminosity implies an unlensed star formation rate (SFR) for this galaxy of 119 +/- 10 Msol per yr, which is a factor of 1.9 +/- 0.35 lower than the SFR derived from the nebular Pa-alpha emission line (a 2.5-sigma discrepancy). Both SFR indicators assume identical Salpeter initial mass functions (IMF) with slope Gamma=2.35 over a mass range of 0.1 - 100 Msol, thus this discrepancy suggests that more ionizing photons may be necessary to account for the higher Pa-alpha-derived SFR. We examine a number of scenarios and find that the observations can be explained with a varying star formation history (SFH) due to an increasing star formation rate (SFR), paired with a slight flattening of the IMF. If the SFR is constant in time, then larger changes need to be made to the IMF by either increasing the upper-mass cutoff to ~ 200 Msol, or a flattening of the IMF slope to 1.9 +/- 0.15, or a combination of the two. These scenarios result in up to double the number of stars with masses above 20 Msol, which produce the requisite increase in ionizing photons over a Salpeter IMF with a constant SFH.
  • We present Keck spectroscopic observations of z>6 Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) candidates in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF). The candidates were selected as i'-dropout objects down to z'=27 AB magnitudes from an ultra-deep SDF z'-band image. With the Keck spectroscopy we identified 19 LBGs with prominent Ly_alpha emission lines at 6< z < 6.4. The median value of the Ly_alpha rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) is ~50 A, with four EWs >100 A. This well-defined spectroscopic sample spans a UV-continuum luminosity range of -21.8< M_{UV}<-19.5 (0.6~5 L*_{UV}) and a Ly_alpha luminosity range of (0.3~3) x 10^{43} erg s^{-1} (0.3~3 L*_ {Ly_alpha}). We derive the UV and Ly_alpha luminosity functions (LFs) from our sample at <z>~6.2 after we correct for sample incompleteness. We find that our measurement of the UV LF is consistent with the results of previous studies based on photometric LBG samples at 5<z<7. Our Ly_alpha LF is also generally in agreement with the results of Ly_alpha-emitter surveys at z~5.7 and 6.6. This study shows that deep spectroscopic observations of LBGs can provide unique constraints on both the UV and Ly_alpha LFs at z>6.