• Count data and recurrent events in clinical trials, such as the number of lesions in magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis, the number of relapses in multiple sclerosis, the number of hospitalizations in heart failure, and the number of exacerbations in asthma or in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often modeled by negative binomial distributions. In this manuscript we study planning and analyzing clinical trials with group sequential designs for negative binomial outcomes. We propose a group sequential testing procedure for negative binomial outcomes based on Wald statistics using maximum likelihood estimators. The asymptotic distribution of the proposed group sequential tests statistics are derived. The finite sample size properties of the proposed group sequential test for negative binomial outcomes and the methods for planning the respective clinical trials are assessed in a simulation study. The simulation scenarios are motivated by clinical trials in chronic heart failure and relapsing multiple sclerosis, which cover a wide range of practically relevant settings. Our research assures that the asymptotic normal theory of group sequential designs can be applied to negative binomial outcomes when the hypotheses are tested using Wald statistics and maximum likelihood estimators. We also propose two methods, one based on Student's t-distribution and one based on resampling, to improve type I error rate control in small samples. The statistical methods studied in this manuscript are implemented in the R package \textit{gscounts}, which is available for download on the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN).
  • In confirmatory clinical trials with small sample sizes, hypothesis tests based on asymptotic distributions are often not valid and exact non-parametric procedures are applied instead. However, the latter are based on discrete test statistics and can become very conservative, even more so, if adjustments for multiple testing as the Bonferroni correction are applied. We propose improved exact multiple testing procedures for the setting where two parallel groups are compared in multiple binary endpoints. Based on the joint conditional distribution of test statistics of Fisher's exact tests, optimal rejection regions for intersection hypotheses tests are constructed. To efficiently search the large space of possible rejection regions, we propose an optimization algorithm based on constrained optimization and integer linear programming. Depending on the optimization objective, the optimal test yields maximal power under a specific alternative, maximal exhaustion of the nominal type I error rate, or the largest possible rejection region controlling the type I error rate. Applying the closed testing principle, we construct optimized multiple testing procedures with strong familywise error rate control. Furthermore, we propose a greedy algorithm for nearly optimal tests, which is computationally more efficient. We numerically compare the unconditional power of the optimized procedure with alternative approaches and illustrate the optimal tests with a clinical trial example in a rare disease.
  • We describe a general framework for weighted parametric multiple test procedures based on the closure principle. We utilize general weighting strategies that can reflect complex study objectives and include many procedures in the literature as special cases. The proposed weighted parametric tests bridge the gap between rejection rules using either adjusted significance levels or adjusted $p$-values. This connection is possible by allowing intersection hypotheses to be tested at level smaller than $\alpha$, which may be needed for certain study considerations. For such cases we introduce a subclass of exact $\alpha$-level parametric tests which satisfy the consonance property. When only subsets of test statistics are correlated, a new procedure is proposed to fully utilize the parametric assumptions within each subset. We illustrate the proposed weighted parametric tests using a clinical trial example.
  • Statistical methodology for the design and analysis of clinical Phase II dose response studies, with related software implementation, are well developed for the case of a normally distributed, homoscedastic response considered for a single timepoint in parallel group study designs. In practice, however, binary, count, or time-to-event endpoints are often used, typically measured repeatedly over time and sometimes in more complex settings like crossover study designs. In this paper we develop an overarching methodology to perform efficient multiple comparisons and modeling for dose finding, under uncertainty about the dose-response shape, using general parametric models. The framework described here is quite general and covers dose finding using generalized non-linear models, linear and non-linear mixed effects models, Cox proportional hazards (PH) models, etc. In addition to the core framework, we also develop a general purpose methodology to fit dose response data in a computationally and statistically efficient way. Several examples, using a variety of different statistical models, illustrate the breadth of applicability of the results. For the analyses we developed the R add-on package DoseFinding, which provides a convenient interface to the general approach adopted here.
  • This note investigates a number of scenarios in which unadjusted testing following a blinded sample size re-estimation leads to type I error violations. For superiority testing, this occurs in certain small-sample borderline cases. We discuss a number of alternative approaches that keep the type I error rate. The paper also gives a reason why the type I error inflation in the superiority context might have been missed in previous publications and investigates why it is more marked in case of non-inferiority testing.
  • High-dimensional tests are applied to find relevant sets of variables and relevant models. If variables are selected by analyzing the sums of products matrices and a corresponding mean-value test is performed, there is the danger that the nominal error of first kind is exceeded. In the paper, well-known multivariate tests receive a new mathematical interpretation such that the error of first kind of the combined testing and selecting procedure can more easily be kept. The null hypotheses on mean values are replaced by hypotheses on distributional sphericity of the individual score responses. Thus, model choice is possible without too strong restrictions. The method is presented for all linear multivariate designs. It is illustrated by an example from bioinformatics: The selection of gene sets for the comparison of groups of patients suffering from B-cell lymphomas.