• We introduce a $\textit{frequency-dependent}$ Doppler and aberration transformation kernel for the harmonic multipoles of a general cosmological observable with spin weight $s$, Doppler weight $d$ and arbitrary frequency spectrum. In the context of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) studies, the frequency-dependent formalism allows to correct for the motion-induced aberration and Doppler effects on individual frequency maps with different masks. It also permits to deboost background radiations with non-blackbody frequency spectra, like extragalactic foregrounds and CMB spectra with primordial spectral distortions. The formalism can also be used to correct individual E and B polarization modes and account for motion-induced E/B mixing of polarized observables with $d\neq1$ at different frequencies. We apply the generalized aberration kernel on polarized and unpolarized CMB specific intensity at 100 and 217 GHz and show that the motion-induced effects typically increase with the frequency of observation. In all-sky CMB experiments, the frequency-dependence of the motion-induced effects for a blackbody spectrum are overall negligible. However in a cut-sky analysis, ignoring the frequency dependence can lead to percent level error in the polarized and unpolarized power spectra over all angular scales. In the specific cut-sky used in our analysis ($b > 45^\circ, f_\text{sky}\simeq14\%$), and for the dipole-inferred velocity $\beta=0.00123$ typically attributed to our peculiar motion, the Doppler and aberration effects can change polarized and unpolarized power spectra of specific intensity in the CMB rest frame by $1-2\%$, but we find the polarization cross-leakage between E and B modes to be negligible.
  • We present a general framework for accurate spectral modeling of the low multipoles of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as observed in a boosted frame. In particular, we demonstrate how spectral measurements of the low multipoles can be used to separate the motion-induced dipole of the CMB from a possible intrinsic dipole component. In a moving frame, the leakage of an intrinsic dipole moment into the CMB monopole and quadrupole induces spectral distortions with distinct frequency functions that respectively peak at 337 GHz and 276 GHz. The leakage into the quadrupole moment also induces a geometrical distortion to the spatial morphology of this mode. The combination of these effects can be used to lift the degeneracy between the motion-induced dipole and any intrinsic dipole that the CMB might possess. Assuming the current peculiar velocity measurements, the leakage of an intrinsic dipole with an amplitude of $\Delta T = 30\mu$K into the monopole and quadrupole moments will be detectable by a PIXIE--like experiment at $\sim 40~$nK ($2.5\sigma$) and $\sim 130~$nK ($11\sigma$) level at their respective peak frequencies.
  • We present a new galaxy cluster catalog constructed from SDSS DR9 using an Adaptive Matched Filter technique. Our main catalog has 46,479 galaxy clusters with richness $\Lambda_{200} > 20$ in the redshift range 0.045 $\le z <$ 0.641 in $\sim$11,500 $deg^{2}$ of the sky. Angular position, richness, core and virial radii and redshift estimates for these clusters, as well as their error analysis are provided. We also provide an extended version with a lower richness cut, containing 79,368 clusters. This version, in addition to the clusters in the main catalog, also contains those clusters (with richness $<20$) which have a one-to-one match in the DR8 catalog developed by Wen et al (WHL). We obtain probabilities for cluster membership for each galaxy and implement several procedures for the identification and removal of false cluster detections. We compare our catalog with other SDSS-based ones such as the redMaPPer (26,350 clusters) and the WHL (132,684 clusters) in the same area of the sky and in the overlapping redshift range. We match 97$\%$ of the richest Abell clusters, the same as WHL, while redMaPPer matches $\sim 90\%$ of these clusters. Considering AMF DR9 richness bins, redMaPPer consistently does not possess one-to-one matches for $\sim$20$\%$ AMF DR9 clusters with $\Lambda_{200}>40$, while WHL matches $\geq$70$\%$ of these missed clusters on average. We also match the AMF catalog with the X-ray cluster catalogs BAX, MCXC and a combined catalog from NORAS and REFLEX. We consistently obtain a greater number of one-to-one matches for X-ray clusters across higher luminosity bins ($L_x>6 \times 10^{44}$ ergs/sec) than redMaPPer while WHL matches the most clusters overall. For the most luminous clusters ($L_x>8$), our catalog performs equivalently to WHL. This new catalog provides a wider sample than redMaPPer while retaining many fewer objects than WHL.
  • We present a joint analysis of Chandra X-ray observations, Bolocam thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect observations, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) strong lensing data, and HST and Subaru Suprime-Cam weak lensing data. The multiwavelength dataset is used to constrain parametric models for the distribution of dark and baryonic matter in a sample of six massive galaxy clusters selected from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). For five of the six clusters, the multiwavelength dataset is well described by a relatively simple model that assumes spherical symmetry, hydrostatic equilibrium, and entirely thermal pressure support. The joint analysis yields considerably better constraints on the total mass and concentration of the cluster compared to analysis of any one dataset individually. The subsample of five galaxy clusters is used to place an upper limit on the fraction of pressure support in the intracluster medium (ICM) due to nonthermal processes, such as turbulence and bulk flow of the gas. We constrain the nonthermal pressure fraction at r500c to be less than 0.11 at 95 percent confidence. This is in tension with state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations, which predict a nonthermal pressure fraction of approximately 0.25 at r500c for clusters of similar mass and redshift. This tension may be explained by the sample selection and/or our assumption of spherical symmetry.
  • We present a novel mathematical formalism that allows to easily compute the expected kinetic Sunyaev Zeldovich (kSZ) signal in intensity and polarization due to an anisotropic primordial Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We derive the expected intensity and polarization distortions in the direction of non-moving galaxy clusters and then we generalize our calculations for non-zero peculiar velocity. We show that, in the direction of moving clusters, low CMB multipoles impose intensity and polarization spectral distortions with different frequency dependences. The polarization signal primarily probes the quadrupole moment of the CMB, with a significant contribution from the primordial dipole and octupole moments. For a typical cluster velocity of 1000 km/s, corrections to the quadrupole-induced polarization of a non-moving cluster are of the order of 2-10% between 200-600 GHz, and depend on cluster's position on the sky, velocity magnitude and direction of motion. We also find that the angular dependence of the signal varies with frequency of observation. The distinct frequency and angular dependences of the polarization induced by the primordial dipole and octupole can be exploited to measure them despite other physical effects and foregrounds. Contrary to polarization, intensity distortions are affected by all the CMB multipoles, so they cannot be readily used to probe the low multipoles at higher redshifts. However, correlations between intensity and polarization signals, can be used to enhance the signal to noise ratio for the measurements of the primordial dipole, quadrupole and octupole. The more general calculation of the aberration kernel presented in this work has applications reaching beyond the SZ cluster science addressed here. For example, it can be exploited to the deboost/deaberrate CMB multipoles as observed in our local frame.
  • SPHEREx is a proposed SMEX mission selected for Phase A. SPHEREx will carry out the first all-sky spectral survey and provide for every 6.2" pixel a spectra between 0.75 and 4.18 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$41.4] and 4.18 and 5.00 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$135]. The SPHEREx team has proposed three specific science investigations to be carried out with this unique data set: cosmic inflation, interstellar and circumstellar ices, and the extra-galactic background light. It is readily apparent, however, that many other questions in astrophysics and planetary sciences could be addressed with the SPHEREx data. The SPHEREx team convened a community workshop in February 2016, with the intent of enlisting the aid of a larger group of scientists in defining these questions. This paper summarizes the rich and varied menu of investigations that was laid out. It includes studies of the composition of main belt and Trojan/Greek asteroids; mapping the zodiacal light with unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution; identifying and studying very low-metallicity stars; improving stellar parameters in order to better characterize transiting exoplanets; studying aliphatic and aromatic carbon-bearing molecules in the interstellar medium; mapping star formation rates in nearby galaxies; determining the redshift of clusters of galaxies; identifying high redshift quasars over the full sky; and providing a NIR spectrum for most eROSITA X-ray sources. All of these investigations, and others not listed here, can be carried out with the nominal all-sky spectra to be produced by SPHEREx. In addition, the workshop defined enhanced data products and user tools which would facilitate some of these scientific studies. Finally, the workshop noted the high degrees of synergy between SPHEREx and a number of other current or forthcoming programs, including JWST, WFIRST, Euclid, GAIA, K2/Kepler, TESS, eROSITA and LSST.
  • We measure the SZ signal toward a set of 47 clusters with a median mass of $9.5 \times 10^{14}$ M$_{\odot}$ and a median redshift of 0.40 using data from Planck and the ground-based Bolocam receiver. When Planck XMM-like masses are used to set the scale radius $\theta_{\textrm{s}}$, we find consistency between the integrated SZ signal, $Y_{\textrm{5R500}}$, derived from Bolocam and Planck based on gNFW model fits using A10 shape parameters, with an average ratio of $1.069 \pm 0.030$ (allowing for the $\simeq 5$% Bolocam flux calibration uncertainty). We also perform a joint fit to the Bolocam and Planck data using a modified A10 model with the outer logarithmic slope $\beta$ allowed to vary, finding $\beta = 6.13 \pm 0.16 \pm 0.76$ (measurement error followed by intrinsic scatter). In addition, we find that the value of $\beta$ scales with mass and redshift according to $\beta \propto M^{0.077 \pm 0.026} \times (1+z)^{-0.06 \pm 0.09}$. This mass scaling is in good agreement with recent simulations. We do not observe the strong trend of $\beta$ with redshift seen in simulations, though we conclude that this is most likely due to our sample selection. Finally, we use Bolocam measurements of $Y_{500}$ to test the accuracy of the Planck completeness estimate. We find consistency, with the actual number of Planck detections falling approximately $1 \sigma$ below the expectation from Bolocam. We translate this small difference into a constraint on the the effective mass bias for the Planck cluster cosmology results, with $(1-b) = 0.93 \pm 0.06$.
  • Gamma rays and microwave observations of the Galactic Center and surrounding areas indicate the presence of anomalous emission, whose origin remains ambiguous. The possibility of dark matter (DM) annihilation explaining both signals through prompt emission at gamma-rays and secondary emission at microwave frequencies from interactions of high-energy electrons produced in annihilation with the Galactic magnetic fields has attracted much interest in recent years. We investigate the DM interpretation of the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess by searching for the associated synchrotron in the WMAP-Planck data. Considering various magnetic field and cosmic-ray propagation models, we predict the synchrotron emission due to DM annihilation in our Galaxy, and compare it with the WMAP-Planck data at 23-70GHz. In addition to standard microwave foregrounds, we separately model the microwave counterpart to the Fermi Bubbles and the signal due to DM, and use component separation techniques to extract the signal associated with each template from the total emission. We confirm the presence of the Haze at the level of 7% of the total sky intensity at 23GHz in our chosen region of interest, with a harder spectrum $I \sim \nu^{-0.8}$ than the synchrotron from regular cosmic-ray electrons. The data do not show a strong preference towards fitting the Haze by either the Bubbles or DM emission only. Inclusion of both components provides a better fit with a DM contribution to the Haze emission of 20% at 23GHz, however, due to significant uncertainties in foreground modeling, we do not consider this a clear detection of a DM signal. We set robust upper limits on the annihilation cross section by ignoring foregrounds, and also report best-fit DM annihilation parameters obtained from a complete template analysis. We conclude that the WMAP-Planck data are consistent with a DM interpretation of the gamma-ray excess.
  • We report our analysis of MACS J0717.5+3745 using 140 and 268 GHz Bolocam data collected at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We detect extended Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect signal at high significance in both Bolocam bands, and we employ Herschel-SPIRE observations to subtract the signal from dusty background galaxies in the 268 GHz data. We constrain the two-band SZ surface brightness toward two of the sub-clusters of MACS J0717.5+3745: the main sub-cluster (named C), and a sub-cluster identified in spectroscopic optical data to have a line-of-sight velocity of +3200 km/s (named B). We determine the surface brightness in two separate ways: via fits of parametric models and via direct integration of the images. For both sub-clusters, we find consistent surface brightnesses from both analysis methods. We constrain spectral templates consisting of relativistically corrected thermal and kinetic SZ signals, using a jointly-derived electron temperature from Chandra and XMM-Newton under the assumption that each sub-cluster is isothermal. The data show no evidence for a kinetic SZ signal toward sub-cluster C, but they do indicate a significant kinetic SZ signal toward sub-cluster B. The model-derived surface brightnesses for sub-cluster B yield a best-fit line-of-sight velocity of v_z = +3450 +- 900 km/s, with (1 - Prob[v_z > 0]) = 1.3 x 10^-5 (4.2 sigma away from 0 for a Gaussian distribution). The directly integrated sub-cluster B SZ surface brightnesses provide a best-fit v_z = +2550 +- 1050 km/s, with (1 - Prob[v_z > 0]) = 2.2 x 10^-3 (2.9 sigma).
  • The presence of massive neutrinos has a characteristic impact on the growth of large scale structures such as galaxy clusters. We forecast on the capability of the number count and power spectrum measured from the ongoing and future Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) cluster surveys, combined with cosmic microwave background (CMB) observation to constrain the total neutrino mass $\mnu$ in a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. We adopt self-calibration for the mass-observable scaling relation, and evaluate constraints for the South Pole Telescope normal and with polarization (SPT, SPTPol), Planck, and Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarization (ACTPol) surveys. We find that a sample of $\approx1000$ clusters obtained from the Planck cluster survey plus extra information from CMB lensing extraction could tighten the current upper bound on the sum of neutrino masses to $\sigma_{\mnu}=0.17$ eV at 68% C.L. Our analysis shows that cluster number counts and power spectrum provide complementary constraints and as a result they help reducing the error bars on $\mnu$ by a factor of 4-8 when both probes are combined. We also show that the main strength of cluster measurements in constraining $\mnu$ is when good control of cluster systematics is available. When applying a weak prior on the mass-observable relations, which can be at reach in the upcoming cluster surveys, we obtain $\sigma_{\mnu}=0.48$ eV using cluster only probes and, more interestingly, $\sigma_{\mnu}=0.08$ eV using cluster + CMB which corresponds to a $S/N\approx4$ detection for $\mnu\ge0.3$ eV. We analyze and discuss the degeneracies of $\mnu$ with other parameters and investigate the sensitivity of neutrino mass constraints with various surveys specifications.
  • We describe Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect measurements and analysis of the intracluster medium (ICM) pressure profiles of a set of 45 massive galaxy clusters imaged using Bolocam at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We have used masses determined from Chandra X-ray observations to scale each cluster's profile by the overdensity radius R500 and the mass-and-redshift-dependent normalization factor P500. We deproject the average pressure profile of our sample into 13 logarithmically spaced radial bins between 0.07R500 and 3.5R500. We find that a generalized Navarro, Frenk, and White (gNFW) profile describes our data with sufficient goodness-of-fit and best-fit parameters (C500, alpha, beta, gamma, P0 = 1.18, 0.86, 3.67, 0.67, 4.29). We also use the X-ray data to define cool-core and disturbed subsamples of clusters, and we constrain the average pressure profiles of each of these subsamples. We find that given the precision of our data the average pressure profiles of disturbed and cool-core clusters are consistent with one another at R>~0.15R500, with cool-core systems showing indications of higher pressure at R<~0.15R500. In addition, for the first time, we place simultaneous constraints on the mass scaling of cluster pressure profiles, their ensemble mean profile, and their radius-dependent intrinsic scatter between 0.1R500 and 2.0R500. The scatter among profiles is minimized at radii between ~0.2R500 and ~0.5R500, with a value of ~20%. The best-fit mass scaling has a power-law slope of 0.49, which is shallower than the nominal prediction of 2/3 from self-similar hydrostatic equilibrium models. These results for the intrinsic scatter and mass scaling are largely consistent with previous analyses, most of which have relied heavily on X-ray derived pressures of clusters at significantly lower masses and redshifts compared to our sample.
  • We describe in detail our characterization of the compact radio source population in 140 GHz Bolocam observations of a set of 45 massive galaxy clusters. We use a combination of 1.4 and 30 GHz data to select a total of 28 probable cluster-member radio galaxies and also to predict their 140 GHz flux densities. All of these galaxies are steep-spectrum radio sources and they are found preferentially in the cool-core clusters within our sample. In particular, 11 of the 12 brightest cluster member radio sources are associated with cool-core systems. Although none of the individual galaxies are robustly detected in the Bolocam data, the ensemble-average flux density at 140 GHz is consistent with, but slightly lower than, the extrapolation from lower frequencies assuming a constant spectral index. In addition, our data indicate an intrinsic scatter of 30 percent around the power-law extrapolated flux densities at 140 GHz, although our data do not tightly constrain this scatter. For our cluster sample, which is composed of high-mass and moderate-redshift systems, we find that the maximum fractional change in the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal integrated over any single cluster due to the presence of these radio sources is 20 percent, and only 1/4 of the clusters show a fractional change of more than 1 percent. The amount of contamination is strongly dependent on cluster morphology, and nearly all of the clusters with more than 1 percent contamination are cool-core systems. This result indicates that radio contamination is not significant compared to current noise levels in 140 GHz images of massive clusters and is in good agreement with the level of radio contamination found in previous results based on lower frequency data or simulations.
  • We present 90, 140, and 268GHz sub-arcminute resolution imaging of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) in MACSJ0717.5+3745. Our 90GHz SZE data result in a sensitive, 34uJy/bm map at 13" resolution using MUSTANG. Our 140 and 268GHz SZE imaging, with resolutions of 58" and 31" and sensitivities of 1.8 and 3.3mJy/beam respectively, was obtained using Bolocam. We compare these maps to a 2-dimensional pressure map derived from Chandra X-ray observations. Our MUSTANG data confirm previous indications from Chandra of a pressure enhancement due to shock-heated, >20keV gas immediately adjacent to extended radio emission seen in low-frequency radio maps. The MUSTANG data also detect pressure substructure that is not well-constrained by the X-ray data in the remnant core of a merging subcluster. We find that the small-scale pressure enhancements in the MUSTANG data amount to ~2% of the total pressure measured in the 140GHz Bolocam observations. The X-ray template also fails on larger scales to accurately describe the Bolocam data, particularly at the location of a subcluster known to have a high line of sight optical velocity (~3200km/s). Our Bolocam data are adequately described when we add an additional component - not described by a thermal SZE spectrum - coincident with this subcluster. Using flux densities extracted from our model fits, and marginalizing over the temperature constraints for the region, we fit a thermal+kinetic SZE spectrum to our data and find the subcluster has a best-fit line of sight proper velocity of 3600+3440/-2160km/s. This agrees with the optical velocity estimates for the subcluster. The probability of velocity<0 given our measurements is 2.1%. Repeating this analysis using flux densities measured non-parametrically results in a 3.4% probability of a velocity<=0. We note that this tantalizing result for the kinetic SZE is on resolved, subcluster scales.
  • We perform a Fisher matrix analysis to forecast the capability of ongoing and future Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster surveys in constraining the deviations from Gaussian distribution of primordial density perturbations. We use the constraining power of the cluster number counts and clustering properties to forecast limits on the $\fnl$ parameter. The primordial non-Gaussianity effects on the mass function and halo bias are considered. We adopt self-calibration for the mass-observable scaling relation, and evaluate constraints for the SPT, Planck, CCAT--like, SPTPol and ACTPol surveys. We show that the scale-dependence of halo bias induced by the local NG provides strong constraints on $\fnl$, while the results from number count are two orders of magnitude worse. When combining information from number counts and power spectrum, the \planck\ cluster catalog provides the tightest constraint with $\sigma_{\fnl}=7$ (68% C.L.) even for relatively conservative assumptions on the expected cluster yields and systematics. This value is a factor of 2 smaller than the $1\sigma$ error as measured by WMAP CMB measurements, and comparable to what expected from Planck. We find that the results are mildly sensitive to the mass threshold of the surveys, but strongly depend on the survey coverage: a full-sky survey like Planck is more favorable because it can probe longer wavelengths modes which are most sensitive to NG effects. In addition, the constraints are largely insensitive to priors on nuisance parameters as they are mainly driven by the power spectrum probe which has a mild dependence on the mass-observable relations.
  • Measuring the intrinsic shape and orientation of dark matter (DM) and intracluster (IC) gas in galaxy clusters is crucial to constraining their formation and evolution, and for enhancing the use of clusters as more precise cosmological probes. Extending our previous works, we present for the first time results from a triaxial joint analysis of the galaxy cluster Abell 1835, by means of X-ray, strong lensing (SL) and Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) data. We parametrically reconstruct the full three-dimensional structure (triaxial shape and principal axis orientation) of both the DM and the IC gas, and the level of non-thermal pressure of the IC gas. We find that the intermediate-major and minor-major axis ratios of the DM are 0.71+/-0.08 and 0.59+/-0.05, respectively, and the major axis of the DM halo is inclined with respect to the line of sight at 18.3+/-5.2 deg. We present the first observational measurement of the non-thermal pressure out to R_{200}, which has been evaluated to be a few percent of the total energy budget in the internal regions, while reaching approximately 20% in the outer volumes. We discuss the implications of our method for the viability of the CDM scenario, focusing on the concentration parameter C and the inner slope of the DM gamma in order to test the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm for structure formation: we measure gamma=1.01+/-0.06 and C=4.32+/-0.44, values which are close to the predictions of the CDM model. The combination of X-ray/SL data at high spatial resolution, capable of resolving the cluster core, with the SZ data, which are more sensitive to the cluster outer volume, allows us to characterize the level and the gradient of the gas entropy distribution and non-thermal pressure out to R_{200}, breaking the degeneracy among the physical models describing the thermal history of the ICM.
  • We investigate the constraining power of current and future Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster surveys on the f(R) gravity model. We use a Fisher matrix approach, adopt self-calibration for the mass- observable scaling relation, and evaluate constraints for the SPT, Planck, SPTPol and ACTPol surveys. The modified gravity effects on the mass function, halo bias, matter power spectrum, and mass-observable relation are taken into account. We show that, relying on number counts only, the Planck cluster catalog is expected to reduce current upper limits by about a factor of four, to {\sigma}fR0 = 3 {\times} 10-5 (68% confidence level). Adding the cluster power spectrum further improves the constraints to {\sigma}fR0 = 10-5 for SPT and Planck, and {\sigma}fR0 = 3 {\times} 10-6 for SPTPol, pushing cluster constraints significantly beyond the limit where number counts have no constraining power due to the chameleon screening mechanism. Further, the combination of both observables breaks degeneracies, especially with the expansion history (effective dark energy density and equation of state). The constraints are only mildly worsened by the use of self-calibration but depend strongly on the mass threshold of the cluster samples.
  • We perform a detailed and systematic investigation of the possible impacts of dark stars upon the reionization history of the Universe, and its signatures in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We compute hydrogen reionization histories, CMB optical depths and anisotropy power spectra for a range of stellar populations including dark stars. If dark stars capture large amounts of dark matter via nuclear scattering, reionization can be substantially delayed, leading to decreases in the integrated optical depth to last scattering and large-scale power in the EE polarization power spectrum. Using the integrated optical depth observed by WMAP7, in our canonical reionization model we rule out the section of parameter space where dark stars with high scattering-induced capture rates tie up more than ~90% of all the first star-forming baryons, and live for over ~250 Myr. When nuclear scattering delivers only moderate amounts of dark matter, reionization can instead be sped up slightly, modestly increasing the CMB optical depth. If dark stars do not obtain any dark matter via nuclear scattering, effects upon reionization and the CMB are negligible. The effects of dark stars upon reionization and its CMB markers can be largely mimicked or compensated for by changes in the existing parameters of reionization models, making dark stars difficult to disentangle from astrophysical uncertainties, but also widening the range of standard parameters in reionization models that can be made consistent with observations.
  • We examine sources of scatter in scaling relations between galaxy cluster mass and thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect using cluster samples extracted from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Overall, the scatter of the mass-SZ scaling relation is well correlated with the scatter in the mass-halo concentration relation with more concentrated halos having stronger integrated SZ signals at fixed mass. Additional sources of intrinsic scatter are projection effects from correlated structures, which cause the distribution of scatter to deviate from log-normality and skew it towards higher inferred masses, and the dynamical state of clusters. We study the evolution of merging clusters based on simulations of 39 clusters and their cosmological environment with high time resolution. This sample enables us to study for the first time the detailed evolution of merging clusters around the scaling relation for a cosmologically representative distribution of merger parameters. Major mergers cause an asymmetric scatter such that the inferred mass of merging systems is biased low. We find mergers to be the dominant source of bias towards low inferred masses: over 50% of outliers on this side of the scaling relation underwent a major merger within the last Gigayear. As the fraction of dynamically disturbed clusters increases with redshift, our analysis indicates that mergers cause a redshift-dependent bias in scaling relations. Furthermore, we find the SZ morphology of massive clusters to be well correlated with the clusters' dynamical state, suggesting that morphology may be used to constrain merger fractions and identify merger-induced outliers of the scaling relation.
  • We present a new cluster catalog extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6) using an adaptive matched filter (AMF) cluster finder. We identify 69,173 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.045 $\le z <$ 0.78 in 8420 sq. deg. of the sky. We provide angular position, redshift, richness, core and virial radii estimates for these clusters, as well as an error analysis for each of these quantities. We also provide a catalog of more than 205,000 galaxies representing the three brightest galaxies in the $r$ band which are possible BCG candidates. We show basic properties of the BCG candidates and study how their luminosity scales in redshift and cluster richness. We compare our catalog with the maxBCG and GMBCG catalogs, as well as with that of Wen, Han, and Liu. We match between 30% and 50% of clusters between catalogs over all overlapping redshift ranges. We find that the percentage of matches increases with the richness for all catalogs. We cross match the AMF catalog with available X-ray data in the same area of the sky and find 539 matches, 119 of which with temperature measurements. We present scaling relations between optical and X-ray properties and cluster center comparison. We find that both $\Lambda_{200}$ and $R_{200}$ correlate well with both $L_X$ and $T_X$, with no significant difference in trend if we restrict the matches to flux-limited X-ray samples.
  • We show that, in a model of modified gravity based on the spectral action functional, there is a nontrivial coupling between cosmic topology and inflation, in the sense that the shape of the possible slow-roll inflation potentials obtained in the model from the nonperturbative form of the spectral action are sensitive not only to the geometry (flat or positively curved) of the universe, but also to the different possible non-simply connected topologies. We show this by explicitly computing the nonperturbative spectral action for some candidate flat cosmic topologies given by Bieberbach manifolds and showing that the resulting inflation potential differs from that of the flat torus by a multiplicative factor, similarly to what happens in the case of the spectral action of the spherical forms in relation to the case of the 3-sphere. We then show that, while the slow-roll parameters differ between the spherical and flat manifolds but do not distinguish different topologies within each class, the power spectra detect the different scalings of the slow-roll potential and therefore distinguish between the various topologies, both in the spherical and in the flat case.
  • We present initial results from our ongoing program to image the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in galaxy clusters at 143 GHz using Bolocam; five clusters and one blank field are described in this manuscript. The images have a resolution of 58 arcsec and a radius of 6-7 arcmin, which is approximately r500 - 2r500 for these clusters. The beam-smoothed RMS is ~10 uK_CMB in these images; with this sensitivity we are able to detect SZ signal to beyond r500 in binned radial profiles. We have fit our images to beta and Nagai models, fixing spherical symmetry or allowing for ellipticity in the plane of the sky, and we find that the best-fit parameter values are in general consistent with those obtained from other X-ray and SZ data. Our data show no clear preference for the Nagai model or the beta model due to the limited spatial dynamic range of our images. However, our data show a definitive preference for elliptical models over spherical models. The weighted mean ellipticity of the five clusters is 0.27 +- 0.03, consistent with results from X-ray data. Additionally, we obtain model-independent estimates of Y500, the integrated SZ y-parameter over the cluster face to a radius of r500, with systematics-dominated uncertainties of ~10%. Our Y500 values, which are free from the biases associated with model-derived Y500 values, scale with cluster mass in a way that is consistent with both self-similar predictions and expectations of a 10% intrinsic scatter.
  • Asantha Cooray, Steve Eales, Scott Chapman, David L. Clements, Olivier Dore, Duncan Farrah, Matt J. Jarvis, Manoj Kaplinghat, Mattia Negrello, Alessandro Melchiorri, Hiranya Peiris, Alexandra Pope, Mario G. Santos, Stephen Serjeant, Mark Thompson, Glenn White, Alexandre Amblard, Manda Banerji, Pier-Stefano Corasaniti, Sudeep Das, Francesco de_Bernardis, Gianfranco de_Zotti, Tommaso Giannantonio, Joaquin Gonzalez-Nuevo Gonzalez, Ali Ahmad Khostovan, Ketron Mitchell-Wynne, Paolo Serra, Yong-Seon Song, Joaquin Vieira, Lingyu Wang, Michael Zemcov, Filipe Abdalla, Jose Afonso, Nabila Aghanim, Paola Andreani, Itziar Aretxaga, Robbie Auld, Maarten Baes, Andrew Baker, Denis Barkats, R. Belen Barreiro, Nicola Bartolo, Elizabeth Barton, Sudhanshu Barway, Elia Stefano Battistelli, Carlton Baugh, Alexander Beelen, Karim Benabed, Andrew Blain, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James J. Bock, J. Richard Bond, Julian Borrill, Colin Borys, Alessandro Boselli, Francois R. Bouchet, Carrie Bridge, Fabrizio Brighenti, Veronique Buat, David Buote, Denis Burgarella, Robert Bussmann, Erminia Calabrese, Christopher Cantalupo, Raymond Carlberg, Carla Sofia Carvalho, Caitlin Casey, Antonio Cava, Jordi Cepa, Edward Chapin, Ranga Ram Chary, Xuelei Chen, Sergio Colafrancesco, Shaun Cole, Peter Coles, Alexander Conley, Luca Conversi, Jeff Cooke, Steven Crawford, Catherine Cress, Elisabete da Cunha, Gavin Dalton, Luigi Danese, Helmut Dannerbauer, Jonathan Davies, Paolo de Bernardis, Roland de Putter, Mark Devlin, Jose M. Diego, Herve Dole, Marian Douspis, Joanna Dunkley, James Dunlop, Loretta Dunne, Rolando Dunner, Simon Dye, George Efstathiou, Eiichi Egami, Taotao Fang, Patrizia Ferrero, Alberto Franceschini, Christopher C. Frazer, David Frayer, Carlos Frenk, Ken Ganga, Raphael Gavazzi, Jason Glenn, Yan Gong, Eduardo Gonzalez-Solares, Matt Griffin, Qi Guo, Mark Gurwell, Amir Hajian, Mark Halpern, Duncan Hanson, Martin Hardcastle, Evanthia Hatziminaoglou, Alan Heavens, Sebastien Heinis, Diego Herranz, Matt Hilton, Shirley Ho, Benne W. Holwerda, Rosalind Hopwood, Jonathan Horner, Kevin Huffenberger, David H. Hughes, John P. Hughes, Edo Ibar, Rob Ivison, Neal Jackson, Andrew Jaffe, Timothy Jenness, Gilles Joncas, Shahab Joudaki, Sugata Kaviraj, Sam Kim, Lindsay King, Theodore Kisner, Johan Knapen, Alexei Kniazev, Eiichiro Komatsu, Leon Koopmans, Chao-Lin Kuo, Cedric Lacey, Ofer Lahav, Anthony N. Lasenby, Andy Lawrence, Myung Gyoon Lee, Lerothodi L. Leeuw, Louis R. Levenson, Geraint Lewis, Nicola Loaring, Marcos Lopez-Caniego, Steve Maddox, Tobias Marriage, Gaelen Marsden, Enrique Martinez-Gonzalez, Silvia Masi, Sabino Matarrese, William G. Mathews, Shuji Matsuura, Richard McMahon, Yannick Mellier, Felipe Menanteau, Michal J. Michalowski, Marius Millea, Bahram Mobasher, Subhanjoy Mohanty, Ludovic Montier, Kavilan Moodley, Gerald H. Moriarty-Schieven, Angela Mortier, Dipak Munshi, Eric Murphy, Kirpal Nandra, Paolo Natoli, Hien Nguyen, Seb Oliver, Alain Omont, Lyman Page, Mathew Page, Roberta Paladini, Stefania Pandolfi, Enzo Pascale, Guillaume Patanchon, John Peacock, Chris Pearson, Ismael Perez-Fournon, Pablo G. Perez-Gonz, Francesco Piacentini, Elena Pierpaoli, Michael Pohlen, Etienne Pointecouteau, Gianluca Polenta, Jason Rawlings, Erik D. Reese, Emma Rigby, Giulia Rodighiero, Encarni Romero-Colmenero, Isaac Roseboom, Michael Rowan-Robinson, Miguel Sanchez-Portal, Fabian Schmidt, Michael Schneider, Bernhard Schulz, Douglas Scott, Chris Sedgwick, Neelima Sehgal, Nick Seymour, Blake D. Sherwin, Jo Short, David Shupe, Jonathan Sievers, Ramin Skibba, Joseph Smidt, Anthony Smith, Daniel J. B. Smith, Matthew W. L. Smith, David Spergel, Suzanne Staggs, Jason Stevens, Eric Switzer, Toshinobu Takagi, Tsutomu Takeuchi, Pasquale Temi, Markos Trichas, Corrado Trigilio, Katherine Tugwell, Grazia Umana, William Vacca, Mattia Vaccari, Petri Vaisanen, Ivan Valtchanov, Kurt van der Heyden, Paul P. van der Werf, Eelco van_Kampen, Ludovic van_Waerbeke, Simona Vegetti, Marcella Veneziani, Licia Verde, Aprajita Verma, Patricio Vielva, Marco P. Viero, Baltasar Vila Vilaro, Julie Wardlow, Grant Wilson, Edward L. Wright, C. Kevin Xu, Min S. Yun
    July 22, 2010 astro-ph.CO
    A large sub-mm survey with Herschel will enable many exciting science opportunities, especially in an era of wide-field optical and radio surveys and high resolution cosmic microwave background experiments. The Herschel-SPIRE Legacy Survey (HSLS), will lead to imaging data over 4000 sq. degrees at 250, 350, and 500 micron. Major Goals of HSLS are: (a) produce a catalog of 2.5 to 3 million galaxies down to 26, 27 and 33 mJy (50% completeness; 5 sigma confusion noise) at 250, 350 and 500 micron, respectively, in the southern hemisphere (3000 sq. degrees) and in an equatorial strip (1000 sq. degrees), areas which have extensive multi-wavelength coverage and are easily accessible from ALMA. Two thirds of the of the sources are expected to be at z > 1, one third at z > 2 and about a 1000 at z > 5. (b) Remove point source confusion in secondary anisotropy studies with Planck and ground-based CMB data. (c) Find at least 1200 strongly lensed bright sub-mm sources leading to a 2% test of general relativity. (d) Identify 200 proto-cluster regions at z of 2 and perform an unbiased study of the environmental dependence of star formation. (e) Perform an unbiased survey for star formation and dust at high Galactic latitude and make a census of debris disks and dust around AGB stars and white dwarfs.
  • We present an alternative estimate of the unresolved point source contribution to the WMAP temperature power spectrum based on current knowledge of sources from radio surveys in the 1.4-90 GHz range. We implement a stochastic extrapolation of radio point sources in the NRAO-VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) catalog, from the original 1.4 GHz to the ~ 100 GHz frequency range relevant for CMB experiments. With a bootstrap approach, we generate an ensemble of realizations that provides the probability distribution for the flux of each NVSS source at the final frequency. The predicted source counts agree with WMAP results for S > 1 Jy and the corresponding sky maps correlate with WMAP observed maps in Q-, V- and W- bands, for sources with flux S > 0.2 Jy. The low-frequency radio surveys found a steeper frequency dependence for sources just below the WMAP nominal threshold than the one estimated by the WMAP team. This feature is present in our simulations and translates into a shift of 0.3-0.4 \sigma in the estimated value of the tilt of the power spectrum of scalar perturbation, n_s, as well as \omega_c. This approach demonstrates the use of external point sources datasets for CMB data analysis.
  • Measurements of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy have served as the best experimental probe of the early universe to date. The inflationary paradigm, inspired in part by the extreme isotropy of the CMB, is now a cornerstone in modern cosmology. Inflation has passed a series of rigorous experimental tests, but we still do not understand the physical mechanism or energy scale behind inflation. A general prediction of inflation and one that can provide certain insights into inflationary physics is a background of primordial gravitational waves. These perturbations leave a distinct signature in the CMB B-modes of polarization. The EPIC (Experimental Probe of Inflationary Cosmology) study team has investigated several CMB polarization mission concepts to carry out a definitive measurement of the inflationary B-mode polarization spectrum. In this report we study a mission with an aperture intermediate between the two missions discussed in our previous report. EPIC-IM's increased aperture allows access to a broader science case than the small EPIC-Low Cost mission. In addition to the search for inflationary gravitational waves, the increase aperture allows us to mine the scale polarization and lensing shear polarization signals down to cosmological limits, so that we extract virtually all the cosmological information available from the CMB. In addition, a modest number of channels operating at higher frequencies allows for an all-sky measurement of polarized Galactic dust, which will provide a rich dataset for Galactic science related to magnetic fields. Using a combination of a large sensitivity focal plane with a new optical design, and an efficient 4K mechanical cooler, EPIC-IM realizes higher sensitivity than EPIC-Comprehensive Science mission.
  • We present constraints on the presence of isocurvature modes from the temperature and polarization CMB spectrum data from the WMAP satellite alone, and in combination with other datasets including SDSS galaxy survey and SNLS supernovae. We find that the inclusion of polarization data allows the WMAP data alone, as well as in combination with complementary observations, to place improved limits on the contribution of CDM and neutrino density isocurvature components individually. With general correlations, the upper limits on these sub-dominant isocurvature components are reduced to ~60% of the first year WMAP results, with specific limits depending on the type of fluctuations. If multiple isocurvature components are allowed, however, we find that the data still allow a majority of the initial power to come from isocurvature modes. As well as providing general constraints we also consider their interpretation in light of specific theoretical models like the curvaton and double inflation.