• We study the orientations of satellite galaxies in redMaPPer clusters constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at $0.1<z<0.35$ to determine whether there is any preferential tendency for satellites to point radially toward cluster centers. We analyze the satellite alignment (SA) signal based on three shape measurement methods (re-Gaussianization, de Vaucouleurs, and isophotal shapes), which trace galaxy light profiles at different radii. The measured SA signal depends on these shape measurement methods. We detect the strongest SA signal in isophotal shapes, followed by de Vaucouleurs shapes. While no net SA signal is detected using re-Gaussianization shapes across the entire sample, the observed SA signal reaches a statistically significant level when limiting to a subsample of higher luminosity satellites. We further investigate the impact of noise, systematics, and real physical isophotal twisting effects in the comparison between the SA signal detected via different shape measurement methods. Unlike previous studies, which only consider the dependence of SA on a few parameters, here we explore a total of 17 galaxy and cluster properties, using a statistical model averaging technique to naturally account for parameter correlations and identify significant SA predictors. We find that the measured SA signal is strongest for satellites with the following characteristics: higher luminosity, smaller distance to the cluster center, rounder in shape, higher bulge fraction, and distributed preferentially along the major axis directions of their centrals. Finally, we provide physical explanations for the identified dependences, and discuss the connection to theories of SA.
  • In the hierarchical formation model, galaxy clusters grow by accretion of smaller groups or isolated galaxies. During the infall into the centre of a cluster, the properties of accreted galaxies change. In particular, both observations and numerical simulations suggest that its dark matter halo is stripped by the tidal forces of the host. We use galaxy-galaxy weak lensing to measure the average mass of dark matter haloes of satellite galaxies as a function of projected distance to the centre of the host, for different stellar mass bins. Assuming that the stellar component of the galaxy is less disrupted by tidal stripping, stellar mass can be used as a proxy of the infall mass. We study the stellar to halo mass relation of satellites as a function of the cluster-centric distance to measure tidal stripping. We use the shear catalogues of the DES science verification archive, the CFHTLenS and the CFHT Stripe 82 (CS82) surveys, and we select satellites from the redMaPPer catalogue of clusters. For galaxies located in the outskirts of clusters, we find a stellar to halo mass relation in good agreement with the theoretical expectations from \citet{moster2013} for central galaxies. In the centre of the cluster, we find that this relation is shifted to smaller halo mass for a given stellar mass. We interpret this finding as further evidence for tidal stripping of dark matter haloes in high density environments.
  • We perform a measurement of the mass--richness relation of the redMaPPer galaxy cluster catalogue using weak lensing data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We have carefully characterized a broad range of systematic uncertainties, including shear calibration errors, photo-$z$ biases, dilution by member galaxies, source obscuration, magnification bias, incorrect assumptions about cluster mass profiles, cluster centering, halo triaxiality, and projection effects. We also compare measurements of the lensing signal from two independently-produced shear and photometric redshift catalogues to characterize systematic errors in the lensing signal itself. Using a sample of 5,570 clusters from $0.1\le z\le 0.33$, the normalization of our power-law mass vs.\ $\lambda$ relation is $\log_{10}[M_{200m}/h^{-1}\ M_{\odot}]$ = $14.344 \pm 0.021$ (statistical) $\pm 0.023$ (systematic) at a richness $\lambda=40$, a 7 per cent calibration uncertainty, with a power-law index of $1.33^{+0.09}_{-0.10}$ ($1\sigma$). The detailed systematics characterization in this work renders it the definitive weak lensing mass calibration for SDSS redMaPPer clusters at this time.
  • Mass around dark matter halos can be divided into "infalling" material and "collapsed" material that has passed through at least one pericenter. Analytical models and simulations predict a rapid drop in the halo density profile associated with the transition between these two regimes. Using data from SDSS, we explore the evidence for such a feature in the density profiles of galaxy clusters and investigate the connection between this feature and a possible phase space boundary. We first estimate the steepening of the outer galaxy density profile around clusters: the profiles show an abrupt steepening, providing evidence for truncation of the halo profile. Next, we measure the galaxy density profile around clusters using two sets of galaxies selected based on color. We find evidence of an abrupt change in the galaxy colors that coincides with the location of the steepening of the density profile. Since galaxies are likely to be quenched of star formation and turn red inside of clusters, this change in the galaxy color distribution can be interpreted as the transition from an infalling regime to a collapsed regime. We also measure this transition using a model comparison approach which has been used recently in studies of the "splashback" phenomenon, but find that this approach is not a robust way to quantify the significance of detecting a splashback-like feature. Finally, we perform measurements using an independent cluster catalog to test for potential systematic errors associated with cluster selection. We identify several avenues for future work: improved understanding of the small-scale galaxy profile, lensing measurements, identification of proxies for the halo accretion rate, and other tests. With upcoming data from the DES, KiDS and HSC surveys, we can expect significant improvements in the study of halo boundaries.
  • SPIDERS (The SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a program dedicated to the homogeneous and complete spectroscopic follow-up of X-ray AGN and galaxy clusters over a large area ($\sim$7500 deg$^2$) of the extragalactic sky. SPIDERS is part of the SDSS-IV project, together with the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) and the Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). This paper describes the largest project within SPIDERS before the launch of eROSITA: an optical spectroscopic survey of X-ray selected, massive ($\sim 10^{14}$ to $10^{15}~M_{\odot}$) galaxy clusters discovered in ROSAT and XMM-Newton imaging. The immediate aim is to determine precise ($\Delta_z \sim 0.001$) redshifts for 4,000-5,000 of these systems out to $z \sim 0.6$. The scientific goal of the program is precision cosmology, using clusters as probes of large-scale structure in the expanding Universe. We present the cluster samples, target selection algorithms and observation strategies. We demonstrate the efficiency of selecting targets using a combination of SDSS imaging data, a robust red-sequence finder and a dedicated prioritization scheme. We describe a set of algorithms and work-flow developed to collate spectra and assign cluster membership, and to deliver catalogues of spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We discuss the relevance of line-of-sight velocity dispersion estimators for the richer systems. We illustrate our techniques by constructing a catalogue of 230 spectroscopically validated clusters ($0.031 < z < 0.658$), found in pilot observations. We discuss two potential science applications of the SPIDERS sample: the study of the X-ray luminosity-velocity dispersion ($L_X-\sigma$) relation and the building of stacked phase-space diagrams.
  • The shapes of cluster central galaxies are not randomly oriented, but rather exhibit coherent alignments with the shapes of their parent clusters as well as with the surrounding large-scale structures. In this work, we aim to identify the galaxy and cluster quantities that most strongly predict the central galaxy alignment phenomenon among a large parameter space with a sample of 8237 clusters and 94817 members within 0.1<z<0.35, based on the redMaPPer cluster catalog constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We first quantify the alignment between the projected central galaxy shapes and the distribution of member satellites, to understand what central galaxy and cluster properties most strongly correlate with these alignments. Next, we investigate the angular segregation of satellites with respect to their central galaxy major axis directions, to identify the satellite properties that most strongly predict their angular segregation. We find that central galaxies are more aligned with their member galaxy distributions in clusters that are more elongated and have higher richness, and for central galaxies with larger physical size, higher luminosity and centering probability, and redder color. Satellites with redder color, higher luminosity, located closer to the central galaxy, and with smaller ellipticity show a stronger angular segregation toward their central galaxy major axes. Finally, we provide physical explanations for some of the identified correlations, and discuss the connection to theories of central galaxy alignments, the impact of primordial alignments with tidal fields, and the importance of anisotropic accretion.
  • When dark matter halos are accreted by massive host clusters, strong gravitational tidal forces begin stripping mass from the accreted subhalos. This stripping eventually removes all mass beyond a subhalo's tidal radius, but the unbound mass remains in the vicinity of the satellite for at least a dynamical time t_dyn. The N-body subhalo study of Chamberlain et al. verified this picture and pointed out a useful observational consequence: measurements of subhalo correlations beyond the tidal radius are sensitive to the infall time, t_infall, of the subhalo onto its host. We perform this cross-correlation measurement using ~ 160,000 red satellite galaxies in SDSS redMaPPer clusters and find evidence that subhalo correlations do persist well beyond the tidal radius, suggesting that many of the observed satellites fell into their current host less than a dynamical time ago, t_infall < t_dyn. Combined with estimated dynamical times t_dyn ~ 3-5 Gyr and SED fitting results for the time at which satellites stopped forming stars, t_quench ~ 6 Gyr, we infer that for a significant fraction of the satellites, star formation quenched before those satellites entered their current hosts. The result holds for red satellites over a large range of cluster-centric distances 0.1 - 0.6 Mpc/h. We discuss the implications of this result for models of galaxy formation.
  • We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Omega_m = 0.31 +/- 0.09 and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as sigma_8 = 0.74 +/- 0.13 after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into S_8 = sigma_8(Omega_m/0.3)^{0.16} = 0.74 +/- 0.12 for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 <z< 0.5, while S_8 = 0.78 +/- 0.09 using two bins over the range 0.2 <z< 0.5. We study the robustness of the results under changes in the data vectors, modelling and systematics treatment, including photometric redshift and shear calibration uncertainties, and find consistency in the derived cosmological parameters. We show that our results are consistent with previous cosmological analyses from DES and other data sets and conclude with a joint analysis of DES angular clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Planck CMB data, Baryon Accoustic Oscillations and Supernova type Ia measurements.
  • The potential of using cluster clustering for calibrating the mass-observable relation of galaxy clusters has been recognized theoretically for over a decade. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this technique to achieve high precision mass calibration using redMaPPer clusters in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey North Galactic Cap. By including cross-correlations between several richness bins in our analysis we significantly improve the statistical precision of our mass constraints. The amplitude of the mass-richness relation is constrained to 7% statistical precision. However, the error budget is systematics dominated, reaching an 18% total error that is dominated by theoretical uncertainty in the bias-mass relation for dark matter halos. We perform a detailed treatment of the effects of assembly bias on our analysis, finding that the contribution of such effects to our parameter uncertainties is somewhat greater than that of measurement noise. We confirm the results from Miyatake et al. (2015) that the clustering amplitude of redMaPPer clusters depends on galaxy concentration, and provide additional evidence in support of this effect being due to some form of assembly bias. The results presented here demonstrate the power of cluster clustering for mass calibration and cosmology provided the current theoretical systematics can be ameliorated.
  • We use the shear catalog from the CFHT Stripe-82 Survey to measure the subhalo masses of satellite galaxies in redMaPPer clusters. Assuming a Chabrier Initial Mass Function (IMF) and a truncated NFW model for the subhalo mass distribution, we find that the sub-halo mass to galaxy stellar mass ratio increases as a function of projected halo-centric radius $r_p$, from $M_{\rm sub}/M_{\rm star}=4.43^{+ 6.63}_{- 2.23}$ at $r_p \in [0.1,0.3]$ $h^{-1}Mpc$ to $M_{\rm sub}/M_{\rm star}=75.40^{+ 19.73}_{- 19.09}$ at $r_p \in [0.6,0.9]$ $h^{-1}Mpc$. We also investigate the dependence of subhalo masses on stellar mass by splitting satellite galaxies into two stellar mass bins: $10<\log(M_{\rm star}/M_{\rm sun})<10.5$ and $11<\log(M_{\rm star}/M_{\rm sun})<12$. The best-fit subhalo mass of the more massive satellite galaxy bin is larger than that of the less massive satellites: $\log(M_{\rm sub}/M_{\rm sun})=11.14 ^{+ 0.66 }_{- 0.73}$ ($M_{\rm sub}/M_{\rm star}=19.5^{+19.8}_{-17.9}$) versus $\log(M_{\rm sub}/M_{\rm sun})=12.38 ^{+ 0.16 }_{- 0.16}$ ($M_{\rm sub}/M_{\rm star}=21.1^{+7.4}_{-7.7}$).
  • Deep optical images are often crowded with overlapping objects. This is especially true in the cores of galaxy clusters, where images of dozens of galaxies may lie atop one another. Accurate measurements of cluster properties require deblending algorithms designed to automatically extract a list of individual objects and decide what fraction of the light in each pixel comes from each object. We present new software called the Gradient And INterpolation based deblender (GAIN) as a secondary deblender to improve deblending the images of cluster cores. This software relies on using image intensity gradient and using an image interpolation technique usually used to correct flawed terrestrial digital images. We test this software on Dark Energy Survey coadd images. GAIN helps extracting unbiased photometry measurement for blended sources. It also helps improving detection completeness while introducing only a modest amount of spurious detections. For example, when applied to deep images simulated with high level of deblending difficulties, this software improves detection completeness from 91% to 97% for sources above the 10? limiting magnitude at 25.3 mag. We expect this software to be a useful tool for cluster population measurements.
  • Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are considered among the best understood samples of galaxies, and they are employed in a broad range of cosmological studies. Because they form a relatively homogeneous population, with high stellar masses and red colors, they are expected to occupy halos in a relatively simple way. In this paper, we study how LRGs occupy massive halos via direct counts in clusters and we reveal several unexpected trends suggesting that the connection between LRGs and dark matter halos may not be straightforward. Using the redMaPPer cluster catalog, we derive the central occupation of LRGs as a function richness, Ncen({\lambda}). Assuming no correlation between cluster mass and central galaxy luminosity at fixed richness, we show that clusters contain a significantly lower fraction of central LRGs than predicted from the two-point correlation function. At halo masses of 10^14.5 Msun, we find Ncen=0.73, compared to Ncen of 0.89 from correlation studies. Our central occupation function for LRGs converges to 0.95 at large halo masses. A strong anti-correlation between central luminosity and cluster mass at fixed richness is required to reconcile our results with those based on clustering studies. We also derive P_BNC, the probability that the brightest cluster member is not the central galaxy. We find P_BNC ~ 20-30% which is a factor of ~2 lower than the value found by Skibba et al. 2011. Finally, we study the radial offsets of bright non-central LRGs from cluster centers and show that bright non-central LRGs follow a different radial distribution compared to red cluster members, which follow a Navarro-Frank-White profile. This work demonstrates that even the most massive clusters do not always have an LRG at the center, and that the brightest galaxy in a cluster is not always the central galaxy.
  • We investigate whether the large scale structure environment of galaxy clusters imprints a selection bias on Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) catalogs. Such a selection effect might be caused by line of sight (LoS) structures that add to the SZ signal or contain point sources that disturb the signal extraction in the SZ survey. We use the Planck PSZ1 union catalog (Planck Collab- oration et al. 2013a) in the SDSS region as our sample of SZ selected clusters. We calculate the angular two-point correlation function (2pcf) for physically correlated, foreground and background structure in the RedMaPPer SDSS DR8 catalog with respect to each cluster. We compare our results with an optically selected comparison cluster sample and with theoretical predictions. In contrast to the hypothesis of no environment-based selection, we find a mean 2pcf for background structures of -0.049 on scales of $\lesssim 40'$, significantly non-zero at $\sim 4 \sigma$, which means that Planck clusters are more likely to be detected in regions of low background density. We hypothesize this effect arises either from background estimation in the SZ survey or from radio sources in the background. We estimate the defect in SZ signal caused by this effect to be negligibly small, of the order of $\sim 10^{-4}$ of the signal of a typical Planck detection. Analogously, there are no implications on X-ray mass measurements. However, the environ- mental dependence has important consequences for weak lensing follow up of Planck galaxy clusters: we predict that projection effects account for half of the mass contained within a 15' radius of Planck galaxy clusters. We did not detect a background underdensity of CMASS LRGs, which also leaves a spatially varying redshift dependence of the Planck SZ selection function as a possible cause for our findings.
  • Weak-lensing measurements of the averaged shear profiles of galaxy clusters binned by some proxy for cluster mass are commonly converted to cluster mass estimates under the assumption that these cluster stacks have spherical symmetry. In this paper we test whether this assumption holds for optically selected clusters binned by estimated optical richness. Using mock catalogues created from N-body simulations populated realistically with galaxies, we ran a suite of optical cluster finders and estimated their optical richness. We binned galaxy clusters by true cluster mass and estimated optical richness and measure the ellipticity of these stacks. We find that the processes of optical cluster selection and richness estimation are biased, leading to stacked structures that are elongated along the line-of-sight. We show that weak-lensing alone cannot measure the size of this orientation bias. Weak lensing masses of stacked optically selected clusters are overestimated by up to 3-6 per cent when clusters can be uniquely associated with haloes. This effect is large enough to lead to significant biases in the cosmological parameters derived from large surveys like the Dark Energy Survey, if not calibrated via simulations or fitted simultaneously. This bias probably also contributes to the observed discrepancy between the observed and predicted Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal of optically-selected clusters.
  • We report the discovery of 12 new fossil groups of galaxies, systems dominated by a single giant elliptical galaxy and cluster-scale gravitational potential, but lacking the population of bright galaxies typically seen in galaxy clusters. These fossil groups (FGs), selected from the maxBCG optical cluster catalog, were detected in snapshot observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We detail the highly successful selection method, with an 80% success rate in identifying 12 FGs from our target sample of 15 candidates. For 11 of the systems, we determine the X-ray luminosity, temperature, and hydrostatic mass, which do not deviate significantly from expectations for normal systems, spanning a range typical of rich groups and poor clusters of galaxies. A small number of detected FGs are morphologically irregular, possibly due to past mergers, interaction of the intra-group medium (IGM) with a central AGN, or superposition of multiple massive halos. Two-thirds of the X-ray-detected FGs exhibit X-ray emission associated with the central BCG, although we are unable to distinguish between AGN and extended thermal galaxy emission using the current data. This sample, a large increase in the number of known FGs, will be invaluable for future planned observations to determine FG temperature, gas density, metal abundance, and mass distributions, and to compare to normal (non-fossil) systems. Finally, the presence of a population of galaxy-poor systems may bias mass function determinations that measure richness from galaxy counts. When used to constrain power spectrum normalization and {\Omega}_m, these biased mass functions may in turn bias these results.
  • Defined as X-ray bright galaxy groups with large differences between the luminosities of their brightest and second brightest galaxies, "fossil groups" are believed to be some of the oldest galaxy systems in the universe. They have therefore been the subject of much recent research. In this work we present a study of 10 fossil group candidates with an average of 33 spectroscopically confirmed members per group, making this the deepest study of its type to-date. We also use this data to perform an analysis of the luminosity function of our sample of fossil groups. We confirm the high masses previously reported for many of fossil systems, finding values more similar to those of clusters than of groups. We also confirm the high dynamical mass-to-light ratios reported in many previous studies. While our results are consistent with previous studies in many ways, our interpretation is not. This is because we show that, while the luminosities of the BCGs in these systems are consistent with their high dynamical masses, their richnesses (total number of galaxies above some canonical value) are extremely low. This leads us to suggest a new interpretation of fossil systems in which the large differences between the luminosities of their brightest and second brightest galaxies are simply the result the high BCG luminosities and low richnesses, while the high masses and low richnesses also explain the high mass-to-light ratios. Our results therefore suggest that fossil systems can be characterised as cluster-like in their masses and BCG luminosities, but possessing the richnesses and optical luminosities of relatively poor groups. These findings are not predicted by any of the current models for the formation of fossil groups. Therefore, if this picture is confirmed, current ideas about the formation and evolution of fossil systems will need to be reformulated.
  • Maximizing the utility of upcoming photometric cluster surveys requires a thorough understanding of the richness-mass relation of galaxy clusters. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the impact of various sources of observational scatter on this relation. Cluster ellipticity, photometric errors, photometric redshift errors, and cluster-to-cluster variations in the properties of red-sequence galaxies contribute negligible noise. Miscentering, however, can be important, and likely contributes to the scatter in the richness-mass relation of galaxy maxBCG clusters at the low mass end, where centering is more difficult. We also investigate the impact of projection effects under several empirically motivated assumptions about cluster environments. Using SDSS data and the maxBCG cluster catalog, we demonstrate that variations in cluster environments can rarely (\approx 1% - 5% of the time) result in significant richness boosts. Due to the steepness of the mass/richness function, the corresponding fraction of optically selected clusters that suffer from these projection effects is \approx 5% - 15%. We expect these numbers to be generic in magnitude, but a precise determination requires detailed, survey-specific modeling.
  • We present Chandra snapshot observations of the first large X-ray sample of optically identified fossil groups. For 9 of 14 candidate groups, we are able to determine the X-ray luminosity and temperature, which span a range typical of large ellipticals to rich groups of galaxies. We discuss these initial results in the context of group IGM and central galaxy ISM evolution, and we also describe plans for a deep X-ray follow-up program.
  • We present the spectral evolution, light curve, and corresponding interpretation for the "normal-bright" Type Ia Supernova 2005cg discovered by ROTSE-IIIc. The host is a low-luminosity (M_r = -16.75), blue galaxy with strong indications of active star formation and an environment similar to that expected for SNe Ia at high redshifts. Early-time (t ~ -10 days) optical spectra obtained with the HET reveal an asymmetric, triangular-shaped Si II absorption feature at about 6100 \AA with a sharp transition to the continuum at a blue shift of about 24,000 km s^-1. By 4 days before maximum, the Si II absorption feature becomes symmetric with smoothly curved sides. Similar Si II profile evolution has previously been observed in other supernovae, and is predicted by some explosion models, but its significance has not been fully recognized. Although the spectra predicted by pure deflagration and delayed detonation models are similar near maximum light, they predict qualitatively different chemical abundances in the outer layers and thus give qualitatively different spectra at the earliest phases. The Si line observed in SN 2005cg at early times requires the presence of burning products at high velocities and the triangular shape is likely to be formed in an extended region of slowly declining Si abundance that characterizes delayed detonation models. The spectra show a high-velocity Ca II IR feature that coincides in velocity space with the Si II cutoff. This supports the interpretation that the Ca II is formed when the outer layers of the SN ejecta sweep up about 5 x 10^-3 M_sun of material within the progenitor system. (Abridged)
  • We present an untriggered search for optical bursts with the ROTSE-I telephoto array. Observations were taken which monitor an effective 256 square degree field continuously over 125 hours to m_{ROTSE}=15.7. The uniquely large field, moderate limiting magnitude and fast cadence of $\sim$10 minutes permits transient searches in a new region of sensitivity. Our search reveals no candidate events. To quantify this result, we simulate potential optical bursts with peak magnitude, m_{p}, at t=10 s, which fade as f=(\frac{t}{t_{0}}) ^{\alpha_{t}}, where \alpha_t < 0. Simple estimates based on observational evidence indicate that a search of this sensitivity begins to probe the possible region occupied by GRB orphan afterglows. Our observing protocol and image sensitivity result in a broad region of high detection efficiency for light curves to the bright and slowly varying side of a boundary running from [\alpha_{t},m_{p}]=[-2.0,6.0] to [-0.3,13.2]. Within this region, the integrated rate of brief optical bursts is less than 1.1\times 10^{-8} {\rm s}^{-1} {\rm deg}^{-2}. At $\sim$22 times the observed GRB rate from BATSE, this suggests a limit on \frac{\theta_{opt}}{\theta_{\gamma}}\lesssim 5 where \theta_{opt} and \theta_{\gamma} are the optical and gamma-ray collimation angles, respectively. Several effects might explain the absence of optical bursts, and a search of the kind described here but more sensitive by about 4 magnitudes should offer a more definitive probe.
  • Gamma-ray bursts of short duration may harbor vital clues to the range of phenomena producing bursts. However, recent progress from the observation of optical counterparts has not benefitted the study of short bursts. We have searched for early optical emission from six gamma-ray bursts using the ROTSE-I telephoto array. Three of these events were of short duration, including GRB 980527 which is among the brightest short bursts yet observed. The data consist of unfiltered CCD optical images taken in response to BATSE triggers delivered via the GCN. For the first time, we have analyzed the entire 16 degree by 16 degree field covered for five of these bursts. In addition, we discuss a search for the optical counterpart to GRB 000201, a well-localized long burst. Single image sensitivities range from 13th to 14th magnitude around 10 s after the initial burst detection, and 14 - 15.8 one hour later. No new optical counterparts were discovered in this analysis suggesting short burst optical and gamma-ray fluxes are uncorrelated.