• We describe a new method for reducing the shape noise in weak lensing measurements by an order of magnitude. Our method relies on spectroscopic measurements of disk galaxy rotation and makes use of the Tully-Fisher relation in order to control for the intrinsic orientations of galaxy disks. For this new proposed method, so-called Kinematic Lensing (KL), the shape noise ceases to be an important source of statistical error. We use the CosmoLike software package to simulate likelihood analyses for two Kinematic Lensing survey concepts (roughly similar in scale to Dark Energy Survey Task Force Stage III and Stage IV missions) and compare their constraining power to a cosmic shear survey from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Our forecasts in seven-dimensional cosmological parameter space include statistical uncertainties resulting from shape noise, cosmic variance, halo sample variance, and higher-order moments of the density field. We marginalize over systematic uncertainties arising from photometric redshift errors and shear calibration biases considering both optimistic and conservative assumptions about LSST systematic errors. We find that even the KL-Stage III is highly competitive with the optimistic LSST scenario, while evading the most important sources of theoretical and observational systematic error inherent in traditional weak lensing techniques. Furthermore, the KL technique enables a narrow-bin cosmic shear tomography approach to tightly constrain time-dependent signatures in the dark energy phenomenon.
  • Intrinsic alignments (IA), correlations between the intrinsic shapes and orientations of galaxies on the sky, are both a significant systematic in weak lensing and a probe of the effect of large-scale structure on galactic structure and angular momentum. In the era of precision cosmology, it is thus especially important to model IA with high accuracy. Efforts to use cosmological perturbation theory to model the dependence of IA on the large-scale structure have thus far been relatively successful; however, extant models do not consistently account for time evolution. In particular, advection of galaxies due to peculiar velocities alters the impact of IA, because galaxy positions when observed are generally different from their positions at the epoch when IA is believed to be set. In this work, we evolve the galaxy IA from the time of galaxy formation to the time at which they are observed, including the effects of this advection, and show how this process naturally leads to a dependence of IA on the velocity shear. We calculate the galaxy-galaxy-IA bispectrum to tree level (in the linear matter density) in terms of the evolved IA coefficients. We then discuss the implications for weak lensing systematics as well as for studies of galaxy formation and evolution. We find that considering advection introduces nonlocality into the bispectrum, and that the degree of nonlocality represents the memory of a galaxy's path from the time of its formation to the time of observation. We discuss how this result can be used to constrain the redshift at which IA is determined and provide Fisher estimation for the relevant measurements using the example of SDSS-BOSS.
  • We derive the complete super-sample covariance (SSC) of the matter and weak lensing convergence power spectra using the power spectrum response formalism to accurately describe the coupling of super- to sub-survey modes. The SSC term is completely characterized by the survey window function, the nonlinear matter power spectrum and the full first-order nonlinear power spectrum response function, which describes the response to super-survey density and tidal field perturbations. Generalized separate universe simulations can efficiently measure these responses in the nonlinear regime of structure formation, which is necessary for lensing applications. We derive the lensing SSC formulae for two cases: one under the Limber and flat-sky approximations, and a more general one that goes beyond the Limber approximation in the super-survey mode and is valid for curved sky applications. Quantitatively, we find that for sky fractions $f_{\rm sky} \approx 0.3$ and a single source redshift at $z_S=1$, the use of the flat-sky and Limber approximation underestimates the total SSC contribution by $\approx 10\%$. The contribution from super-survey tidal fields to the lensing SSC, which has not been included in cosmological analyses so far, is shown to represent about $5\%$ of the total lensing covariance on multipoles $\ell_1,\ell_2 \gtrsim 300$. The SSC is the dominant off-diagonal contribution to the total lensing covariance, making it appropriate to include these tidal terms and beyond flat-sky/Limber corrections in cosmic shear analyses.
  • Cosmic acceleration is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades. Testing and distinguishing among possible explanations requires cosmological measurements of extremely high precision probing the full history of cosmic expansion and structure growth and, ideally, compare and contrast matter and relativistic tracers of the gravity potential. This program is one of the defining objectives of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), as set forth in the New Worlds, New Horizons report (NWNH) in 2010. The WFIRST mission has the ability to improve these measurements by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to the current state of the art, while simultaneously extending their redshift grasp, greatly improving control of systematic effects, and taking a unified approach to multiple probes that provide complementary physical information and cross-checks of cosmological results. We describe in this annual report the activities of the Science Investigation Team (SIT) "Cosmology with the High Latitude Survey (HLS)" during the year 2017. This team was selected by NASA in December 2015 in order to address the stringent challenges of the WFIRST dark energy (DE) program through the Project's formulation phase. This SIT has elected to jointly address Galaxy Redshift Survey, Weak Lensing and Cluster Growth and thus fully embrace the fact that the imaging and spectroscopic elements of the HLS will be realized as an integrated observing program, and they jointly impose requirements on performance and operations. WFIRST is designed to be able to deliver a definitive result on the origin of cosmic acceleration. It is not optimized for Figure of Merit sensitivity but for control of systematic uncertainties and for having multiple techniques each with multiple cross-checks. Our SIT work focuses on understanding the potential systematics in the WFIRST DE measurements.
  • We reexamine interactions between the dark sectors of cosmology, with a focus on robust constraints that can be obtained using only mildly nonlinear scales. While it is well known that couplings between dark matter and dark energy can be constrained to the percent level when including the full range of scales probed by future optical surveys, calibrating matter power spectrum emulators to all possible choices of potentials and couplings requires many computationally expensive n-body simulations. Here we show that lensing and clustering of galaxies in combination with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is capable of probing the dark sector coupling to the few percent level for a given class of models, using only linear and quasi-linear Fourier modes. These scales can, in principle, be described by semi-analytical techniques such as the effective field theory of large-scale structure.
  • The next generation weak lensing surveys (i.e., LSST, Euclid and WFIRST) will require exquisite control over systematic effects. In this paper, we address shear calibration and present the most realistic forecast to date for LSST/Euclid/WFIRST and CMB lensing from a stage 4 CMB experiment (CMB S4). We use the CosmoLike code to simulate a joint analysis of all the two-point functions of galaxy density, galaxy shear and CMB lensing convergence. We include the full Gaussian and non-Gaussian covariances and explore the resulting joint likelihood with Monte Carlo Markov Chains. We constrain shear calibration biases while simultaneously varying cosmological parameters, galaxy biases and photometric redshift uncertainties. We find that CMB lensing from CMB S4 enables the calibration of the shear biases down to 0.2% - 3% in 10 tomographic bins for LSST (below the ~0.5% requirements in most tomographic bins), down to 0.4% - 2.4% in 10 bins for Euclid and 0.6% - 3.2% in 10 bins for WFIRST. For a given lensing survey, the method works best at high redshift where shear calibration is otherwise most challenging. This self-calibration is robust to Gaussian photometric redshift uncertainties and to a reasonable level of intrinsic alignment. It is also robust to changes in the beam and the effectiveness of the component separation of the CMB experiment, and slowly dependent on its depth, making it possible with third generation CMB experiments such as AdvACT and SPT-3G, as well as the Simons Observatory.
  • SPHEREx is a proposed SMEX mission selected for Phase A. SPHEREx will carry out the first all-sky spectral survey and provide for every 6.2" pixel a spectra between 0.75 and 4.18 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$41.4] and 4.18 and 5.00 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$135]. The SPHEREx team has proposed three specific science investigations to be carried out with this unique data set: cosmic inflation, interstellar and circumstellar ices, and the extra-galactic background light. It is readily apparent, however, that many other questions in astrophysics and planetary sciences could be addressed with the SPHEREx data. The SPHEREx team convened a community workshop in February 2016, with the intent of enlisting the aid of a larger group of scientists in defining these questions. This paper summarizes the rich and varied menu of investigations that was laid out. It includes studies of the composition of main belt and Trojan/Greek asteroids; mapping the zodiacal light with unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution; identifying and studying very low-metallicity stars; improving stellar parameters in order to better characterize transiting exoplanets; studying aliphatic and aromatic carbon-bearing molecules in the interstellar medium; mapping star formation rates in nearby galaxies; determining the redshift of clusters of galaxies; identifying high redshift quasars over the full sky; and providing a NIR spectrum for most eROSITA X-ray sources. All of these investigations, and others not listed here, can be carried out with the nominal all-sky spectra to be produced by SPHEREx. In addition, the workshop defined enhanced data products and user tools which would facilitate some of these scientific studies. Finally, the workshop noted the high degrees of synergy between SPHEREx and a number of other current or forthcoming programs, including JWST, WFIRST, Euclid, GAIA, K2/Kepler, TESS, eROSITA and LSST.
  • We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Omega_m = 0.31 +/- 0.09 and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as sigma_8 = 0.74 +/- 0.13 after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into S_8 = sigma_8(Omega_m/0.3)^{0.16} = 0.74 +/- 0.12 for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 <z< 0.5, while S_8 = 0.78 +/- 0.09 using two bins over the range 0.2 <z< 0.5. We study the robustness of the results under changes in the data vectors, modelling and systematics treatment, including photometric redshift and shear calibration uncertainties, and find consistency in the derived cosmological parameters. We show that our results are consistent with previous cosmological analyses from DES and other data sets and conclude with a joint analysis of DES angular clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Planck CMB data, Baryon Accoustic Oscillations and Supernova type Ia measurements.
  • We explore strategies to extract cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy lensing, galaxy clustering, cluster number counts and cluster weak lensing. We utilize the CosmoLike software to simulate results from an LSST like data set, specifically, we 1) compare individual and joint analyses of the different probes, 2) vary the selection criteria for lens and source galaxies, 3) investigate the impact of blending, 4) investigate the impact of the assumed cosmological model in multi-probe covariances, 6) quantify information content as a function of scales, and 7) explore the impact of intrinsic galaxy alignment in a multi-probe context. Our analyses account for all cross correlations within and across probes and include the higher-order (non-Gaussian) terms in the multi-probe covariance matrix. We simultaneously model cosmological parameters and a variety of systematics, e.g. uncertainties arising from shear and photo-z calibration, cluster mass-observable relation, galaxy intrinsic alignment, and galaxy bias (up to 54 parameters altogether). We highlight two results: First, increasing the number density of source galaxies by ~30%, which corresponds to solving blending for LSST, only gains little information. Second, including small scales in clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing, by utilizing HODs, can substantially boost cosmological constraining power. The CosmoLike modules used to compute the results in this paper will be made publicly available at https://github.com/elikrause/CosmoLike_Forecasts.
  • Intrinsic alignment (IA) of source galaxies is one of the major astrophysical systematics for ongoing and future weak lensing surveys. This paper presents the first forecasts of the impact of IA on cosmic shear measurements for current and future surveys (DES, Euclid, LSST, WFIRST) using simulated likelihood analyses and realistic covariances that include higher-order moments of the density field in the computation. We consider a range of possible IA scenarios and test mitigation schemes, which parameterize IA by the fraction of red galaxies, normalization, luminosity and redshift dependence of the IA signal (for a subset we consider joint IA and photo-z uncertainties). Compared to previous studies we find smaller biases in time-dependent dark energy models if IA is ignored in the analysis; the amplitude and significance of these biases vary as a function of survey properties (depth, statistical uncertainties), luminosity function, and IA scenario: Due to its small statistical errors and relatively shallow observing strategy Euclid is significantly impacted by IA. LSST and WFIRST benefit from their increased survey depth, while the larger statistical errors for DES decrease IA's relative impact on cosmological parameters. The proposed IA mitigation scheme removes parameter biases due to IA for DES, LSST, and WFIRST even if the shape of the IA power spectrum is only poorly known; successful IA mitigation for Euclid requires more prior information. We explore several alternative IA mitigation strategies for Euclid; in the absence of alignment of blue galaxies we recommend the exclusion of red (IA contaminated) galaxies in cosmic shear analyses. We find that even a reduction of 20% in the number density of galaxies only leads to a 4-10% loss in cosmological constraining power.
  • SPHEREx (Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe, Epoch of Reionization, and Ices Explorer) ( http://spherex.caltech.edu ) is a proposed all-sky spectroscopic survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's Astrophysics Division: probe the origin and destiny of our Universe; explore whether planets around other stars could harbor life; and explore the origin and evolution of galaxies. SPHEREx will scan a series of Linear Variable Filters systematically across the entire sky. The SPHEREx data set will contain R=40 spectra fir 0.75$<\lambda<$4.1$\mu$m and R=150 spectra for 4.1$<\lambda<$4.8$\mu$m for every 6.2 arc second pixel over the entire-sky. In this paper, we detail the extra-galactic and cosmological studies SPHEREx will enable and present detailed systematic effect evaluations. We also outline the Ice and Galaxy Evolution Investigations.
  • The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large scale structure is however from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude $f_{\rm NL}^{\rm loc}$ ($f_{\rm NL}^{\rm eq}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are $\Delta f_{\rm NL}^{\rm loc, eq.} \simeq 1$. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.
  • Systematic uncertainties that have been subdominant in past large-scale structure (LSS) surveys are likely to exceed statistical uncertainties of current and future LSS data sets, potentially limiting the extraction of cosmological information. Here we present a general framework (PCA marginalization) to consistently incorporate systematic effects into a likelihood analysis. This technique naturally accounts for degeneracies between nuisance parameters and can substantially reduce the dimension of the parameter space that needs to be sampled. As a practical application, we apply PCA marginalization to account for baryonic physics as an uncertainty in cosmic shear tomography. Specifically, we use CosmoLike to run simulated likelihood analyses on three independent sets of numerical simulations, each covering a wide range of baryonic scenarios differing in cooling, star formation, and feedback mechanisms. We simulate a Stage III (Dark Energy Survey) and Stage IV (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope/Euclid) survey and find a substantial bias in cosmological constraints if baryonic physics is not accounted for. We then show that PCA marginalization (employing at most 3 to 4 nuisance parameters) removes this bias. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain robust, precise constraints on the dark energy equation of state even in the presence of large levels of systematic uncertainty in astrophysical processes. We conclude that the PCA marginalization technique is a powerful, general tool for addressing many of the challenges facing the precision cosmology program.
  • We report the first measurement of the diminutive lensing signal arising from matter underdensities associated with cosmic voids. While undetectable individually, by stacking the weak gravitational shear estimates around 901 voids detected in SDSS DR7 by Sutter et al. (2012a), we find substantial evidence for a depression of the lensing signal compared to the cosmic mean. This depression is most pronounced at the void radius, in agreement with analytical models of void matter profiles. Even with the largest void sample and imaging survey available today, we cannot put useful constraints on the radial dark-matter void profile. We invite independent investigations of our findings by releasing data and analysis code to the public at https://github.com/pmelchior/void-lensing
  • Developing accurate analysis techniques to combine various probes of cosmology is essential to tighten constraints on cosmological parameters and to check for inconsistencies in our model of the Universe. In this paper we develop a joint analysis framework for six different second-order statistics calculated from three tracers of the dark matter density field, namely galaxy position, shear, and magnification. We extend a data compression scheme developed in the context of shear-shear statistics (the so-called COSEBIs) to the other five second-order statistics, thereby significantly reducing the number of data points in the joint data vector. We use CosmoLike, a newly developed software framework for joint likelihood analyses, to forecast parameter constraints for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The simulated MCMCs cover a five dimensional cosmological parameter space comparing the information content of the individual probes to several combined probes (CP) data vectors. Given the significant correlations of these second-order statistics we model all cross terms in the covariance matrix; furthermore we go beyond the Gaussian covariance approximation and use the halo model to include higher order correlations of the density field. We find that adding magnification information (including cross probes with shear and clustering) noticeably increases the information content and that the correct modeling of the covariance (i.e., accounting for non-Gaussianity and cross terms) is essential for accurate likelihood contours from the CP data vector. We also identify several nulltests based on the degeneracy of magnification and shear statistics which can be used to quantify the contamination of data sets by astrophysical systematics and/or calibration issues.
  • One of the most pernicious theoretical systematics facing upcoming gravitational lensing surveys is the uncertainty introduced by the effects of baryons on the power spectrum of the convergence field. One method that has been proposed to account for these effects is to allow several additional parameters (that characterize dark matter halos) to vary and to fit lensing data to these halo parameters concurrently with the standard set of cosmological parameters. We test this method. In particular, we use this technique to model convergence power spectrum predictions from a set of cosmological simulations. We estimate biases in dark energy equation of state parameters that would be incurred if one were to fit the spectra predicted by the simulations either with no model for baryons, or with the proposed method. We show that neglecting baryonic effect leads to biases in dark energy parameters that are several times the statistical errors for a survey like the Dark Energy Survey. The proposed method to correct for baryonic effects renders the residual biases in dark energy equation of state parameters smaller than the statistical errors. These results suggest that this mitigation method may be applied to analyze convergence spectra from a survey like the Dark Energy Survey. For significantly larger surveys, such as will be carried out by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the biases introduced by baryonic effects are much more significant. We show that this mitigation technique significantly reduces the biases for such larger surveys, but that a more effective mitigation strategy will need to be developed in order ensure that the residual biases in these surveys fall below the statistical errors.
  • The upcoming new generation of spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys will provide large samples of cosmic voids, the distinct, large underdense structures in the universe. Combining these with future galaxy imaging surveys, we study the prospects of probing the underlying matter distribution in and around cosmic voids via the weak gravitational lensing effects of stacked voids, utilizing both shear and magnification information. The statistical precision is greatly improved by stacking together a large number of voids along different lines of sight, even when taking into account the impact of inherent miscentering and projection effects. We show that Dark Energy Task Force Stage IV surveys, such as the Euclid satellite and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, should be able to detect the void lensing signal with sufficient precision from stacking abundant medium-sized voids, thus providing direct constraints on the matter density profile of voids independent of assumptions on galaxy bias.
  • We present a clustering analysis of near ultraviolet (NUV) - optical color selected luminosity bin samples of green valley galaxies. These galaxy samples are constructed by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 with the latest Galaxy Evolution Explorer source catalog which provides NUV photometry. We present cross-correlation function measurements and determine the halo occupation distribution of these transitional galaxies using a new multiple tracer analysis technique. We extend the halo-occupation formalism to model the cross-correlation function between a galaxy sample of interest and multiple tracer populations simultaneously. This method can be applied to commonly used luminosity threshold samples as well as to color and luminosity bin selected galaxy samples, and improves the accuracy of clustering analyses for sparse galaxy populations. We confirm the previously observed trend that red galaxies reside in more massive halos and are more likely to be satellite galaxies than average galaxies of similar luminosity. While the change in central galaxy host mass as a function of color is only weakly constrained, the satellite fraction and characteristic halo masses of green satellite galaxies are found to be intermediate between those of blue and red satellite galaxies.
  • Decomposing the shear signal into E and B-modes properly, i.e. without leakage of B-modes into the E-mode signal and vice versa, has been a long-standing problem in weak gravitational lensing. At the two-point level this problem was resolved by developing the so-called ring statistics, and later the COSEBIs; however, extending these concepts to the three-point level is far from trivial. Currently used methods to decompose three-point shear correlation functions (3PCFs) into E- and B-modes require knowledge of the 3PCF down to arbitrary small scales. This implies that the 3PCF needs to be modeled on scales smaller than the minimum separation of 2 galaxies and subsequently will be biased towards the model, or, in the absence of a model, the statistics is affected by E/B-mode leakage (or mixing). In this paper we derive a new third-order E/B-mode statistic that performs the decomposition using the 3PCF only on a finite interval, and thereby is free of any E/B-mode leakage while at the same time relying solely on information from the data. In addition, we relate this third-order ring statistics to the convergence field, thereby enabling a fast and convenient calculation of this statistic from numerical simulations. We note that our new statistics should be applicable to corresponding E/B-mode separation problems in the CMB polarization field.
  • We examine sources of scatter in scaling relations between galaxy cluster mass and thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect using cluster samples extracted from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Overall, the scatter of the mass-SZ scaling relation is well correlated with the scatter in the mass-halo concentration relation with more concentrated halos having stronger integrated SZ signals at fixed mass. Additional sources of intrinsic scatter are projection effects from correlated structures, which cause the distribution of scatter to deviate from log-normality and skew it towards higher inferred masses, and the dynamical state of clusters. We study the evolution of merging clusters based on simulations of 39 clusters and their cosmological environment with high time resolution. This sample enables us to study for the first time the detailed evolution of merging clusters around the scaling relation for a cosmologically representative distribution of merger parameters. Major mergers cause an asymmetric scatter such that the inferred mass of merging systems is biased low. We find mergers to be the dominant source of bias towards low inferred masses: over 50% of outliers on this side of the scaling relation underwent a major merger within the last Gigayear. As the fraction of dynamically disturbed clusters increases with redshift, our analysis indicates that mergers cause a redshift-dependent bias in scaling relations. Furthermore, we find the SZ morphology of massive clusters to be well correlated with the clusters' dynamical state, suggesting that morphology may be used to constrain merger fractions and identify merger-induced outliers of the scaling relation.
  • If the orientations of galaxies are correlated with large-scale structure, then anisotropic selection effects such as preferential selection of face-on disc galaxies can contaminate large scale structure observables. Here we consider the effect on the galaxy bispectrum, which has attracted interest as a way to break the degeneracy between galaxy bias and the amplitude of matter fluctuations sigma_8. We consider two models of intrinsic galaxy alignments: one where the probability distribution for the galaxy's orientation contains a term linear in the local tidal field, appropriate for elliptical galaxies; and one with a term quadratic in the local tidal field, which may be applicable to disc galaxies. We compute the correction to the redshift-space bispectrum in the quasilinear regime, and then focus on its effects on parameter constraints from the transverse bispectrum, i.e. using triangles in the plane of the sky. We show that in the linear alignment model, intrinsic alignments result in an error in the galaxy bias parameters, but do not affect the inferred value of sigma_8. In contrast, the quadratic alignment model results in a systematic error in both the bias parameters and sigma_8. However, the quadratic alignment effect has a unique configuration dependence that should enable it to be removed in upcoming surveys.
  • It is usually assumed that the ellipticity power spectrum measured in weak lensing observations can be expressed as an integral over the underlying matter power spectrum. This is true at second order in the gravitational potential. We extend the standard calculation, constructing all corrections to fourth order in the gravitational potential. There are four types of corrections: corrections to the lensing shear due to multiple-deflections; corrections due to the fact that shape distortions probe the reduced shear $\gamma/(1-\kappa)$ rather than the shear itself; corrections associated with the non-linear conversion of reduced shear to mean ellipticity; and corrections due to the fact that observational galaxy selection and shear measurement is based on galaxy brightnesses and sizes which have been (de)magnified by lensing. We show how the previously considered corrections to the shear power spectrum correspond to terms in our analysis, and highlight new terms that were not previously identified. All correction terms are given explicitly as integrals over the matter power spectrum, bispectrum, and trispectrum, and are numerically evaluated for the case of sources at z=1. We find agreement with previous works for the ${\mathcal O}(\Phi^3)$ terms. We find that for ambitious future surveys, the ${\mathcal O}(\Phi^4)$ terms affect the power spectrum at the ~ 1-5 $\sigma$ level; they will thus need to be accounted for, but are unlikely to represent a serious difficulty for weak lensing as a cosmological probe.
  • Commonly used methods to decompose E- and B-modes in cosmic shear, namely the aperture mass dispersion and the E/B-mode shear correlation function, suffer from incomplete knowledge of the two-point correlation function (2PCF) on very small and/or very large scales. The ring statistics, the most recently developed cosmic shear measure, improves on this issue and is able to decompose E- and B-modes using a 2PCF measured on a finite interval. First, we improve on the ring statistics' filter function with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio. Second, we examine the ability of the ring statistics to constrain cosmology and compare the results to cosmological constraints obtained with the aperture mass dispersion. Third, we use the ring statistics to measure a cosmic shear signal from CFHTLS (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey) data. We consider a scale-dependent filter function for the ring statistics which improves its signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, we show that there exist filter functions which decompose E- and B-modes using a finite range of 2PCFs (EB-statistics) and have higher S/N ratio than the ring statistics. However, we find that data points of the latter are significantly less correlated than data points of the aperture mass dispersion and the EB-statistics. As a consequence the ring statistics is an ideal tool to identify remaining systematics accurately as a function of angular scale. We use the 2PCF of the latest CFHTLS analysis and therefrom calculate the ring statistics and its error bars.
  • We describe a model-independent integral constraint which defines an upper limit to the allowed degree of evolution in the ratio of black hole (BH) mass to host galaxy luminosity or mass, as a function of redshift. Essentially, if the BH/host ratio is excessive at redshift z, then it would imply that the total mass density in BHs above some M_BH(min) is larger at that redshift than at z=0, which is impossible. This argument requires no knowledge of host or BH properties, only a lower limit to the observed luminosity density in the brightest galaxies at some z. We calculate this upper limit from a variety of luminosity and mass functions in different bands from redshifts z=0-2. We show that it is consistent with passive evolution of spheroid populations (with a fixed M_BH/M_host relation) in all cases, and provides tighter constraints than have generally been obtained previously, ruling out at >6 sigma observational and theoretical estimates suggesting that M_BH/M_host was significantly larger at high redshifts than locally, although relatively weak (factor ~2 by z=2) evolution is still allowed. We discuss a variety of possible 'loopholes' or changes in the BH/host populations and correlations, and show that they typically lower the upper limits and strengthen our conclusions.