• We analyze age-velocity dispersion relations (AVRs) from kinematics of individual stars in eight Local Group galaxies ranging in mass from Carina ($M_{*} \sim 10^{6}$) to M31 ($M_{*} \sim 10^{11}$). Observationally the $\sigma$ vs. stellar age trends can be interpreted as dynamical heating of the stars by GMCs, bars/spiral arms, or merging subhalos; alternatively the stars could have simply been born out of a more turbulent ISM at high redshift and retain that larger velocity dispersion till present day - consistent with recent IFU studies. To ascertain the dominant mechanism and better understand the impact of instabilities and feedback, we develop models based on observed SFHs of these Local Group galaxies in order to create an evolutionary formalism which describes the ISM velocity dispersion due to a galaxy's evolving gas fraction. These empirical models relax the common assumption that the stars are born from gas which has constant velocity dispersion at all redshifts. Using only the observed SFHs as input, the ISM velocity dispersion and a mid-plane scattering model fits the observed AVRs of low mass galaxies without fine tuning. Higher mass galaxies above $M_{vir} > 10^{11}$ need a larger contribution from latent dynamical heating processes (for example minor mergers), in excess of the ISM model. Using the SFHs we also find that supernovae feedback does not appear to be a dominant driver of the gas velocity dispersion compared to gravitational instabilities - at least for dispersions $\sigma \gtrsim 25$ km/s. Together our results point to stars being born with a velocity dispersion close to that of the gas at the time of their formation, with latent dynamical heating operating with a galaxy mass-dependent efficiency. These semi-empirical relations may help constrain the efficiency of feedback and its impact on the physics of disk settling in galaxy formation simulations.
  • The Canada-France Imaging Survey (CFIS) will map the northern high Galactic latitude sky in the $u$-band ("CFIS-u", 10,000$\, {\rm deg^2}$) and in the $r$-band ("CFIS-r", 5,000$\, {\rm deg^2}$), enabling a host of stand-alone science investigations, and providing some of the ground-based data necessary for photometric redshift determination for the Euclid mission. In this first contribution we present the $u$-band component of the survey, describe the observational strategy, and discuss some first highlight results, based on approximately one third of the final area. We show that the Galactic anticenter structure is distributed continuously along the line of sight, out to beyond 20 kpc, and possesses a metallicity distribution that is essentially identical to that of the outer disk sampled by APOGEE. This suggests that it is probably a buckled disk of old metal-rich stars, rather than a stream or a flare. We also discuss the future potential for CFIS-u in discovering star-forming dwarf galaxies around the Local Group, the characterization of the white dwarf and blue straggler population of the Milky Way, as well as its sensitivity to low-surface brightness structures in external galaxies.
  • We present the chemical distribution of the Milky Way, based on 2,900$\, {\rm deg^2}$ of $u$-band photometry taken as part of the Canada-France Imaging Survey. When complete, this survey will cover 10,000$\, {\rm deg^2}$ of the Northern sky. By combing the CFHT $u$-band photometry together with SDSS and Pan-STARRS $g,r,$ and $i$, we demonstrate that we are able to measure reliably the metallicities of individual stars to $\sim 0.2$ dex, and hence additionally obtain good photometric distance estimates. This survey thus permits the measurement of metallicities and distances of the dominant main-sequence population out to approximately 30 kpc, and provides much higher number of stars at large extraplanar distances than have been available from previous surveys. We develop a non-parametric distance-metallicity decomposition algorithm and apply it to the sky at $30\deg < |b| < 70\deg$ and to the North Galactic Cap. We find that the metallicity-distance distribution is well-represented by three populations whose metallicity distributions do not vary significantly with vertical height above the disk. As traced in main-sequence stars, the stellar halo component shows a vertical density profile that is close to exponential, with a scale height of around 3 kpc. This may indicate that the inner halo was formed partly from disk stars ejected in an ancient minor merger.
  • The stellar halos of galaxies encode their accretion histories. In particular, the median metallicity of a halo is determined primarily by the mass of the most massive accreted object. We use hydrodynamical cosmological simulations from the APOSTLE project to study the connection between the stellar mass, the metallicity distribution, and the stellar age distribution of a halo and the identity of its most massive progenitor. We find that the stellar populations in an accreted halo typically resemble the old stellar populations in a present-day dwarf galaxy with a stellar mass $\sim 0.2-0.5$ dex greater than that of the stellar halo. This suggest that had they not been accreted, the primary progenitors of stellar halos would have evolved to resemble typical nearby dwarf irregulars.
  • We use three different techniques to identify hundreds of white dwarf (WD) candidates in the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) based on photometry from the NGVS and GUViCS, and proper motions derived from the NGVS and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Photometric distances for these candidates are calculated using theoretical color-absolute magnitude relations while effective temperatures are measured by fitting their spectral energy distributions. Disk and halo WD candidates are separated using a tangential velocity cut of 200 km~s$^{-1}$ in a reduced proper motion diagram, which leads to a sample of six halo WD candidates. Cooling ages, calculated for an assumed WD mass of 0.6$M_{\odot}$, range between 60 Myr and 6 Gyr, although these estimates depend sensitively on the adopted mass. Luminosity functions for the disk and halo subsamples are constructed and compared to previous results from the SDSS and SuperCOSMOS survey. We compute a number density of (2.81 $\pm$ 0.52) $\times 10^{-3}$~pc$^{-3}$ for the disk WD population--- consistent with previous measurements. We find (7.85 $\pm$ 4.55) $\times 10^{-6}$~pc$^{-3}$ for the halo, or 0.3\% of the disk. Observed stellar counts are also compared to predictions made by the TRILEGAL and Besan\c{c}on stellar population synthesis models. The comparison suggests that the TRILEGAL model overpredicts the total number of WDs. The WD counts predicted by the Besan\c{c}on model agree with the observations, although a discrepancy arises when comparing the predicted and observed halo WD populations; the difference is likely due to the WD masses in the adopted model halo.
  • We present the Pristine survey, a new narrow-band photometric survey focused on the metallicity-sensitive Ca H & K lines and conducted in the northern hemisphere with the wide-field imager MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). This paper reviews our overall survey strategy and discusses the data processing and metallicity calibration. Additionally we review the application of these data to the main aims of the survey, which are to gather a large sample of the most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy, to further characterise the faintest Milky Way satellites, and to map the (metal-poor) substructure in the Galactic halo. The current Pristine footprint comprises over 1,000 deg2 in the Galactic halo ranging from b~30 to 78 and covers many known stellar substructures. We demonstrate that, for SDSS stellar objects, we can calibrate the photometry at the 0.02-magnitude level. The comparison with existing spectroscopic metallicities from SDSS/SEGUE and LAMOST shows that, when combined with SDSS broad-band g and i photometry, we can use the CaHK photometry to infer photometric metallicities with an accuracy of ~0.2 dex from [Fe/H]=-0.5 down to the extremely metal-poor regime ([Fe/H]<-3.0). After the removal of various contaminants, we can efficiently select metal-poor stars and build a very complete sample with high purity. The success rate of uncovering [Fe/H]SEGUE<-3.0 stars among [Fe/H]Pristine<-3.0 selected stars is 24% and 85% of the remaining candidates are still very metal poor ([Fe/H]<-2.0). We further demonstrate that Pristine is well suited to identify the very rare and pristine Galactic stars with [Fe/H]<-4.0, which can teach us valuable lessons about the early Universe.
  • We examine the spatial distribution of the oldest and most metal poor stellar populations of Milky Way-sized galaxies using the APOSTLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the Local Group. In agreement with earlier work, we find strong radial gradients in the fraction of the oldest (tform < 0.8 Gyr) and most metal poor ([Fe/H]< -2.5) stars, both of which increase outwards. The most metal poor stars form over an extended period of time; half of them form after z = 5.3, and the last 10% after z = 2.8. The age of the metal poor stellar population also shows significant variation with environment; a high fraction of them are old in the galaxy's central regions and an even higher fraction in some individual dwarf galaxies, with substantial scatter from dwarf to dwarf. Overall, over half of the stars that belong to both the oldest and most metal-poor population are found outside the solar circle. Somewhat counter-intuitively, we find that dwarf galaxies with a large fraction of metal poor stars that are very old are systems where metal poor stars are relatively rare, but where a substantial old population is present. Our results provide guidance for interpreting the results of surveys designed to hunt for the earliest and most pristine stellar component of our Milky Way.
  • In the $\Lambda$CDM model of structure formation, a stellar spheroid grows by the assembly of smaller galaxies, the so-called building blocks. Combining the Munich-Groningen semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with the high resolution Aquarius simulations of dark matter haloes, we study the assembly history of the stellar spheroids of six Milky Way-mass galaxies, focussing on building block properties such as mass, age and metallicity. These properties are compared to those of the surviving satellites in the same models. We find that the building blocks have higher star formation rates on average, and this is especially the case for the more massive objects. At high redshift these dominate in star formation over the satellites, whose star formation timescales are longer on average. These differences ought to result in a larger $\alpha$-element enhancement from Type II supernovae in the building blocks (compared to the satellites) by the time Type Ia supernovae would start to enrich them in iron, explaining the observational trends. Interestingly, there are some variations in the star formation timescales of the building blocks amongst the simulated haloes, indicating that [$\alpha$/Fe] abundances in spheroids of other galaxies might differ from those in our own Milky Way.
  • We quantify the impact that a variety of galactic and environmental properties have on the quenching of star formation. We collate a sample of $\sim$ 400,000 central and $\sim$ 100,000 satellite galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7). Specifically, we consider central velocity dispersion ($\sigma_{c}$), stellar, halo, bulge and disk mass, local density, bulge-to-total ratio, group-centric distance and galaxy-halo mass ratio. We develop and apply a new statistical technique to quantify the impact on the quenched fraction ($f_{\rm Quench}$) of varying one parameter, while keeping the remaining parameters fixed. For centrals, we find that the $f_{\rm Quench} - \sigma_{c}$ relationship is tighter and steeper than for any other variable considered. We compare to the Illustris hydrodynamical simulation and the Munich semi-analytic model (L-Galaxies), finding that our results for centrals are qualitatively consistent with their predictions for quenching via radio-mode AGN feedback, hinting at the viability of this process in explaining our observational trends. However, we also find evidence that quenching in L-Galaxies is too efficient and quenching in Illustris is not efficient enough, compared to observations. For satellites, we find strong evidence that environment affects their quenched fraction at fixed central velocity dispersion, particularly at lower masses. At higher masses, satellites behave identically to centrals in their quenching. Of the environmental parameters considered, local density affects the quenched fraction of satellites the most at fixed central velocity dispersion.
  • Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • This short document is intended as a companion and introduction to the Detailed Science Case (DSC) for the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer. It provides a concise summary of the essential characteristics of MSE from the perspective of the international astronomical community. MSE is a wide field telescope (1.5 square degree field of view) with an aperture of 11.25m. It is dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy at several different spectral resolutions in the range R ~ 2500 - 40000 over a broad wavelength range (0.36 - 1.8{\mu}m). MSE will enable transformational science in areas as diverse as exoplanetary host characterization; stellar monitoring campaigns; tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of the distant Galaxy; connecting galaxies to the large scale structure of the Universe; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars. MSE is the largest ground based optical and near infrared telescope in its class, and it will occupy a unique and critical role in the emerging network of astronomical facilities active in the 2020s. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, eROSITA, SKA, and WFIRST, and is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT.
  • The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a deep $u^*giz$ survey targeting the Virgo cluster of galaxies at 16.5~Mpc. This survey provides high-quality photometry over an $\sim$ 100 deg$^2$ region straddling the constellations of Virgo and Coma Berenices. This sightline through the Milky Way is noteworthy in that it intersects two of the most prominent substructures in the Galactic halo: the Virgo Over-Density (VOD) and Sagittarius stellar stream (close to its bifurcation point). In this paper, we use deep $u^*gi$ imaging from the NGVS to perform tomography of the VOD and Sagittarius stream using main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) stars as a halo tracer population. The VOD, whose centroid is known to lie at somewhat lower declinations ($\alpha \sim 190^\circ$, $\delta \sim -5^\circ$) than is covered by the NGVS, is nevertheless clearly detected in the NGVS footprint at distances between $\sim$ 8 and 25~kpc. By contrast, the Sagittarius stream is found to slice directly across the NGVS field at distances between 25 and 40~kpc, with a density maximum at $\simeq$~35~kpc. No evidence is found for new substructures beyond the Sagittarius stream, at least out to a distance of $\sim$~90 kpc --- the largest distance to which we can reliably trace the halo using MSTO stars. We find clear evidence for a distance gradient in the Sagittarius stream across the $\sim 30$~deg of sky covered by the NGVS and its flanking fields. We compare our distance measurements along the stream to those predicted by leading stream models.
  • We statistically quantify the amount of substructure in the Milky Way stellar halo using a sample of 4568 halo K giant stars at Galactocentric distances ranging over 5-125 kpc. These stars have been selected photometrically and confirmed spectroscopically as K giants from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's SEGUE project. Using a position-velocity clustering estimator (the 4distance) and a model of a smooth stellar halo, we quantify the amount of substructure in the halo, divided by distance and metallicity. Overall, we find that the halo as a whole is highly structured. We also confirm earlier work using BHB stars which showed that there is an increasing amount of substructure with increasing Galactocentric radius, and additionally find that the amount of substructure in the halo increases with increasing metallicity. Comparing to resampled BHB stars, we find that K giants and BHBs have similar amounts of substructure over equivalent ranges of Galactocentric radius. Using a friends-of-friends algorithm to identify members of individual groups, we find that a large fraction (~33%) of grouped stars are associated with Sgr, and identify stars belonging to other halo star streams: the Orphan Stream, the Cetus Polar Stream, and others, including previously unknown substructures. A large fraction of sample K giants (more than 50%) are not grouped into any substructure. We find also that the Sgr stream strongly dominates groups in the outer halo for all except the most metal-poor stars, and suggest that this is the source of the increase of substructure with Galactocentric radius and metallicity.
  • We derive the dependence of the fraction of passive central galaxies on the mass of their supermassive black holes for a sample of over 400,000 SDSS galaxies at z < 0.2. Our large sample contains galaxies in a wide range of environments, with stellar masses 8 < log(M*/Msun) < 12, spanning the entire morphological spectrum from pure disks to spheroids. We derive estimates for the black hole masses from measured central velocity dispersions and bulge masses, using a variety of published empirical relationships. We find a very strong dependence of the passive fraction on black hole mass, which is largely unaffected by the details of the black hole mass estimate. Moreover, the passive fraction relationship with black hole mass remains strong and tight even at fixed values of galaxy stellar mass (M*), dark matter halo mass (Mhalo), and bulge-to-total stellar mass ratio (B/T). Whereas, the passive fraction dependence on M*, Mhalo and B/T is weak at fixed MBH. These observations show that, for central galaxies, MBH is the strongest correlator with the passive fraction, consistent with quenching from AGN feedback.
  • The origin of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars and their possible connection with the chemical elements produced by the first stellar generation is still highly debated. In contrast to the Galactic halo, not many CEMP stars have been found in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies around the Milky Way. Here we present detailed abundances from ESO VLT/UVES high-resolution spectroscopy for ET0097, the first CEMP star found in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal. This star has $\text{[Fe/H]}=-2.03\pm0.10$, $\text{[C/Fe]}=0.51\pm0.10$ and $\text{[N/Fe]}=1.18\pm0.20$. The traditional definition of CEMP stars is $\text{[C/Fe]}\geq0.70$, but taking into account that this luminous red giant branch star has undergone mixing, it was intrinsically less nitrogen enhanced and more carbon-rich when it was formed, and so it falls under the definition of CEMP stars, as proposed by Aoki et al. (2007) to account for this effect. By making corrections for this mixing, we conclude that the star had $\text{[C/Fe]}\approx0.8$ during its earlier evolutionary stages. Apart from the enhanced C and N abundances, ET0097 shows no peculiarities in other elements lighter than Zn, and no enhancement of the heavier neutron-capture elements (Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy), making this a CEMP-no star. However, the star does show signs of the weak $r$-process, with an overabundance of the lighter neutron-capture elements (Sr, Y, Zr). To explain the abundance pattern observed in ET0097, we explore the possibility that this star was enriched by primordial stars. In addition to the detailed abundances for ET0097, we present estimates and upper limits for C abundances in 85 other stars in Sculptor derived from CN molecular lines, including 11 stars with $\text{[Fe/H]}\leq-2$. Combining these limits with observations from the literature, the fraction of CEMP-no stars in Sculptor seems to be significantly lower than in the Galactic halo.
  • We present different chemical evolution models for the ultrafaint dwarf galaxy Bootes I. We either assume that the galaxy accretes its mass through smooth infall of gas of primordial chemical composition (classical models) or adopt mass accretion histories derived from the combination of merger trees with semi-analytical modelling (cosmologically-motivated models). Furthermore, we consider models with and without taking into account inhomogeneous mixing in the ISM within the galaxy. The theoretical predictions are then compared to each other and to the body of the available data. From this analysis, we confirm previous findings that Bootes I has formed stars with very low efficiency but, at variance with previous studies, we do not find a clear-cut indication that supernova explosions have sustained long-lasting galactic-scale outflows in this galaxy. Therefore, we suggest that external mechanisms such as ram pressure stripping and tidal stripping are needed to explain the absence of neutral gas in Bootes I today.
  • We use cosmological N-body simulations from the Aquarius Project to study the tidal effects of a dark matter halo on the shape and orientation of its substructure. Although tides are often assumed to enhance asphericity and to stretch subhaloes tangentially, these effects are short lived: as in earlier work, we find that subhaloes affected by tides become substantially more spherical and show a strong radial alignment toward the centre of the host halo. These results, combined with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, may be used to assess the effect of Galactic tides on the observed population of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites of the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies. If, as the model suggests, the relatively low dark matter content of luminous dSphs such as Fornax and Leo I is due to tidal stripping, then their gravitational potential must be substantially more spherical than that of more heavily dark matter-dominated systems such as Draco or Carina. The model also predicts a tidally-induced statistical excess of satellites whose major axis aligns with the direction to the central galaxy. We find tantalizing evidence of this in the M31 satellite population, which suggests that tides may have played an important role in its evolution.
  • We examine the mid-infrared fluxes and spectral energy distributions for metal-poor stars with iron abundances [Fe/H] $\lesssim-5$, as well as two CEMP-no stars, to eliminate the possibility that their low metallicities are related to the depletion of elements onto dust grains in the formation of a debris disk. Six out of seven stars examined here show no mid-IR excess. These non-detections rule out many types of circumstellar disks, e.g. a warm debris disk ($T\!\le\!290$ K), or debris disks with inner radii $\le1$ AU, such as those associated with the chemically peculiar post-AGB spectroscopic binaries and RV Tau variables. However, we cannot rule out cooler debris disks, nor those with lower flux ratios to their host stars due to, e.g. a smaller disk mass, a larger inner disk radius, an absence of small grains, or even a multicomponent structure, as often found with the chemically peculiar Lambda Bootis stars. The only exception is HE0107-5240, for which a small mid-IR excess near 10 microns is detected at the 2-$\sigma$ level; if the excess is real and associated with this star, it may indicate the presence of (recent) dust-gas winnowing or a binary system.
  • A substantial fraction of the lowest metallicity stars show very high enhancements in carbon. It is debated whether these enhancements reflect the stars' birth composition, or if their atmospheres were subsequently polluted, most likely by accretion from an AGB binary companion. Here we investigate and compare the binary properties of three carbon-enhanced sub-classes: The metal-poor CEMP-s stars that are additionally enhanced in barium; the higher metallicity (sg)CH- and Ba II stars also enhanced in barium; and the metal-poor CEMP-no stars, not enhanced in barium. Through comparison with simulations, we demonstrate that all barium-enhanced populations are best represented by a ~100% binary fraction with a shorter period distribution of at maximum ~20,000 days. This result greatly strengthens the hypothesis that a similar binary mass transfer origin is responsible for their chemical patterns. For the CEMP-no group we present new radial velocity data from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope for 15 stars to supplement the scarce literature data. Two of these stars show indisputable signatures of binarity. The complete CEMP-no dataset is clearly inconsistent with the binary properties of the CEMP-s class, thereby strongly indicating a different physical origin of their carbon enhancements. The CEMP-no binary fraction is still poorly constrained, but the population resembles more the binary properties in the Solar Neighbourhood.
  • We investigate the origin of galaxy bimodality by quantifying the relative role of intrinsic and environmental drivers to the cessation (or `quenching') of star formation in over half a million local Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. Our sample contains a wide variety of galaxies at z=0.02-0.2, with stellar masses of 8 < log(M*/M_sun) < 12, spanning the entire morphological range from pure disks to spheroids, and over four orders of magnitude in local galaxy density and halo mass. We utilise published star formation rates and add to this recent GIM2D photometric and stellar mass bulge + disk decompositions from our group. We find that the passive fraction of galaxies increases steeply with stellar mass, halo mass, and bulge mass, with a less steep dependence on local galaxy density and bulge-to-total stellar mass ratio (B/T). At fixed internal properties, we find that central and satellite galaxies have different passive fraction relationships. For centrals, we conclude that there is less variation in the passive fraction at a fixed bulge mass, than for any other variable, including total stellar mass, halo mass, and B/T. This implies that the quenching mechanism must be most tightly coupled to the bulge. We argue that radio-mode AGN feedback offers the most plausible explanation of the observed trends.
  • We use simulations of Milky Way-sized dark matter haloes from the Aquarius Project to investigate the orbits of substructure haloes likely, according to a semi-analytic galaxy formation model, to host luminous satellites. These tend to populate the most massive subhaloes and are on more radial orbits than the majority of subhaloes found within the halo virial radius. One reason for this (mild) kinematic bias is that many low-mass subhaloes have apocentres that exceed the virial radius of the main host; they are thus excluded from subhalo samples identified within the virial boundary, reducing the number of subhalos on radial orbits. Two other factors contributing to the difference in orbital shape between dark and luminous subhaloes are their dynamical evolution after infall, which affects more markedly low-mass (dark) subhaloes, and a weak dependence of ellipticity on the redshift of first infall. The ellipticity distribution of luminous satellites exhibits little halo-to-halo scatter and it may therefore be compared fruitfully with that of Milky Way satellites. Since the latter depends sensitively on the total mass of the Milky Way we can use the predicted distribution of satellite ellipticities to place constraints on this important parameter. Using the latest estimates of position and velocity of dwarfs compiled from the literature, we find that the most likely Milky Way mass lies in the range $6 \times 10^{11} M_{\odot} < M_{200} < 3.1 \times 10^{12} M_{\odot}$, with a best fit value of $M_{200} = 1.1 \times 10^{12} M_{\odot}$. This value is consistent with Milky Way mass estimates based on dynamical tracers or the timing argument.
  • We present a new approach for chemical evolution modelling, specifically designed to investigate the chemical properties of dwarf galaxies in a full cosmological framework. In particular, we focus on the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy as a test bed for our model. We select four candidate Sculptor-like galaxies from the satellite galaxy catalogue generated by implementation of a version of the Munich semi-analytic model for galaxy formation on the level 2 Aquarius dark matter simulations. We follow explicitly the evolution of several chemical elements, both in the cold gas out of which the stars form and in the hot medium residing in the halo. We take into account in detail the lifetimes of stars of different initial masses, the distribution of the delay times for type Ia supernova explosions and the dependency of the stellar yields from the initial metallicity of the stars. We allow large fractions of metals to be deposited into the hot phase, either directly as stars die or through reheated gas flows powered by supernova explosions. In order to reproduce both the observed metallicity distribution function and the observed abundance ratios of long-lived stars of Sculptor, large fractions of the reheated metals must never re-enter regions of active star formation. Our analysis sets further constraints on the semi-analytical models and, at large, on possible metal enrichment scenarios for the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy.
  • Building on our previous spectroscopic and photometric analysis of the isolated Local Group dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxy WLM, we present a comparison of the metallicities of its RGB stars with respect to the well studied Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) and Magellanic Clouds. We calculate a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]$ = -1.28 \pm 0.02$, and intrinsic spread in metallicity of $\sigma = 0.38 \pm 0.04$ dex, similar to the mean and spread observed in the massive dSph Fornax and the Small Magellanic Cloud. Thus, despite its isolated environment the global metallicity still follows expectations for WLM's mass and its global chemical evolution is similar to other nearby luminous dwarf galaxies (gas-rich or gas-poor). The data also show a radial gradient in [Fe/H] of $\rm{d[Fe/H]/dr_{c}} = -0.04 \pm 0.04$ dex $\rm{r_{c}^{-1}}$, which is flatter than that seen in the unbiased and spatially extended surveys of dSphs. Comparison of the spatial distribution of [Fe/H] in WLM, the Magellanic Clouds, and a sample of Local Group dSphs, shows an apparent dichotomy in the sense that the dIrrs have statistically flatter radial [Fe/H] gradients than the low angular momentum dSphs. The correlation between angular momentum and radial metallicity gradient is further supported when considering the Local Group dEs. This chemodynamic relationship offers a new and useful constraint for environment driven dwarf galaxy evolution models in the Local Group.
  • Current models of galaxy formation predict that galaxy pairs of comparable magnitudes should become increasingly rare with decreasing luminosity. This seems at odds with the relatively high frequency of pairings among dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. We use literature data to show that ~30% of all satellites of the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies brighter than M_V=-8 are found in likely physical pairs of comparable luminosity. Besides the previously recognised pairings of the Magellanic Clouds and of NGC 147/NGC 185, other candidate pairs include the Ursa Minor and Draco dwarf spheroidals, as well as the And I/And III satellites of M31. These pairs are much closer than expected by chance if the radial and angular distributions of satellites were uncorrelated; in addition, they have very similar line-of-sight velocities and luminosities that differ by less than three magnitudes. In contrast, the same criteria pair fewer than 4% of satellites in N-body/semi-analytic models that match the radial distribution and luminosity function of Local Group satellites. If confirmed in studies of larger samples, the high frequency of dwarf galaxy pairings may provide interesting clues to the formation of faint galaxies in the current cosmological paradigm.
  • We present abundances for seven stars in the (extremely) low-metallicity tail of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy, from spectra taken with X-shooter on the ESO VLT. Targets were selected from the Ca II triplet (CaT) survey of the Dwarf Abundances and Radial Velocities Team (DART) using the latest calibration. Of the seven extremely metal-poor candidates, five stars are confirmed to be extremely metal-poor (i.e., [Fe/H]<-3 dex), with [Fe/H]=-3.47 +/- 0.07 for our most metal-poor star. All are around or below [Fe/H]=-2.5 dex from the measurement of individual Fe lines. These values are in agreement with the CaT predictions to within error bars. None of the seven stars is found to be carbon-rich. We estimate a 2-13% possibility of this being a pure chance effect, which could indicate a lower fraction of carbon-rich extremely metal-poor stars in Sculptor compared to the Milky Way halo. The [alpha/Fe] ratios show a range from +0.5 to -0.5, a larger variation than seen in Galactic samples although typically consistent within 1-2sigma. One star seems mildly iron-enhanced. Our program stars show no deviations from the Galactic abundance trends in chromium and the heavy elements barium and strontium. Sodium abundances are, however, below the Galactic values for several stars. Overall, we conclude that the CaT lines are a successful metallicity indicator down to the extremely metal-poor regime and that the extremely metal-poor stars in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy are chemically more similar to their Milky Way halo equivalents than the more metal-rich population of stars.