• In this paper, we consider the well-known modal logics $\mathbf{K}$, $\mathbf{T}$, $\mathbf{K4}$, and $\mathbf{S4}$, and we study some of their sub-propositional fragments, namely the classical Horn fragment, the Krom fragment, the so-called core fragment, defined as the intersection of the Horn and the Krom fragments, plus their sub-fragments obtained by limiting the use of boxes and diamonds in clauses. We focus, first, on the relative expressive power of such languages: we introduce a suitable measure of expressive power, and we obtain a complex hierarchy that encompasses all fragments of the considered logics. Then, after observing the low expressive power, in particular, of the Horn fragments without diamonds, we study the computational complexity of their satisfiability problem, proving that, in general, it becomes polynomial.
  • We investigate the satisfiability problem for Horn fragments of the Halpern-Shoham interval temporal logic depending on the type (box or diamond) of the interval modal operators, the type of the underlying linear order (discrete or dense), and the type of semantics for the interval relations (reflexive or irreflexive). For example, we show that satisfiability of Horn formulas with diamonds is undecidable for any type of linear orders and semantics. On the contrary, satisfiability of Horn formulas with boxes is tractable over both discrete and dense orders under the reflexive semantics and over dense orders under the irreflexive semantics, but becomes undecidable over discrete orders under the irreflexive semantics. Satisfiability of binary Horn formulas with both boxes and diamonds is always undecidable under the irreflexive semantics.
  • Modal logic is a paradigm for several useful and applicable formal systems in computer science. It generally retains the low complexity of classical propositional logic, but notable exceptions exist in the domains of description, temporal, and spatial logic, where the most expressive formalisms have a very high complexity or are even undecidable. In search of computationally well-behaved fragments, clausal forms and other sub-propositional restrictions of temporal and description logics have been recently studied. This renewed interest on sub-propositional logics, which mainly focus on the complexity of the various fragments, raise natural questions on their the relative expressive power, which we try to answer here for the basic multi-modal logic Kn. We consider the Horn and the Krom restrictions, as well as the combined restriction (known as the core fragment) of modal logic, and, orthogonally, the fragments that emerge by disallowing boxes or diamonds from positive literals. We study the problem in a very general setting, to ease transferring our results to other meaningful cases.