• Quantum spin liquids (QSLs) are intriguing phases of matter possessing fractionalized excitations. Several quasi-two dimensional materials have been proposed as candidate QSLs, but direct evidence for fractionalization in these systems is still lacking. In this paper, we show that the inter-plane thermal conductivity in layered QSLs carries a unique signature of fractionalization. We examine several types of gapless QSL phases - a $Z_2$ QSL with either a Dirac spectrum or a spinon Fermi surface, and a $U(1)$ QSL with a Fermi surface. In all cases, the in-plane and $c-$axis thermal conductivities have a different power law dependence on temperature, due to the different mechanisms of transport in the two directions: in the planes, the thermal current is carried by fractionalized excitations, whereas the inter-plane current is carried by integer (non-fractional) excitations. In layered $Z_2$ and $U(1)$ QSLs with a Fermi surface, the $c-$axis thermal conductivity is parametrically smaller than the in-plane one, but parametrically larger than the phonon contribution at low temperatures.
  • Metallic quantum critical phenomena are believed to play a key role in many strongly correlated materials, including high temperature superconductors. Theoretically, the problem of quantum criticality in the presence of a Fermi surface has proven to be highly challenging. However, it has recently been realized that many models used to describe such systems are amenable to numerically exact solution by quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) techniques, without suffering from the fermion sign problem. In this article, we review the status of the understanding of metallic quantum criticality, and the recent progress made by QMC simulations. We focus on the cases of spin density wave and Ising nematic criticality. We describe the results obtained so far, and their implications for superconductivity, non-Fermi liquid behavior, and transport in the vicinity of metallic quantum critical points. Some of the outstanding puzzles and future directions are highlighted.
  • We develop a framework to analyze one-dimensional topological superconductors with charge conservation. In particular, we consider models with $N$ flavors of fermions and $(\mathbb{Z}_2)^N$ symmetry, associated with the conservation of the fermionic parity of each flavor. For a single flavor, we recover the result that a distinct topological phase with exponentially localized zero modes does not exist due to absence of a gap to single particles in the bulk. For $N>1$, however, we show that the ends of the system can host low-energy, exponentially-localized modes. The analysis can readily be generalized to systems in other symmetry classes. To illustrate these ideas, we focus on lattice models with $SO\left(N\right)$ symmetric interactions, and study the phase transition between the trivial and the topological gapless phases using bosonization and a weak-coupling renormalization group analysis. As a concrete example, we study in detail the case of $N=3$. We show that in this case, the topologically non-trivial superconducting phase corresponds to a gapless analogue of the Haldane phase in spin-1 chains. In this phase, although the bulk is gapless to single particle excitations, the ends host spin-$1/2$ degrees of freedom which are exponentially localized and protected by the spin gap in the bulk. We obtain the full phase diagram of the model numerically, using density matrix renormalization group calculations. Within this model, we identify the self-dual line studied by Andrei and Destri [Nucl. Phys. B, 231(3), 445-480 (1984)], as a first-order transition line between the gapless Haldane phase and a trivial gapless phase. This allows us to identify the propagating spin-$1/2$ kinks in the Andrei-Destri model as the topological end-modes present at the domain walls between the two phases.
  • We construct examples of translationally invariant solvable models of strongly-correlated metals, composed of lattices of Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev dots with identical local interactions. These models display crossovers as a function of temperature into regimes with local quantum criticality and marginal-Fermi liquid behavior. In the marginal Fermi liquid regime, the dc resistivity increases linearly with temperature over a broad range of temperatures. By generalizing the form of interactions, we also construct examples of non-Fermi liquids with critical Fermi-surfaces. The self energy has a singular frequency dependence, but lacks momentum dependence, reminiscent of a dynamical mean field theory-like behavior but in dimensions $d<\infty$. In the low temperature and strong-coupling limit, a heavy Fermi liquid is formed. The critical Fermi-surface in the non-Fermi liquid regime gives rise to quantum oscillations in the magnetization as a function of an external magnetic field in the absence of quasiparticle excitations. We discuss the implications of these results for local quantum criticality and for fundamental bounds on relaxation rates. Drawing on the lessons from these models, we formulate conjectures on coarse grained descriptions of a class of intermediate scale non-fermi liquid behavior in generic correlated metals.
  • We investigate the interplay between charge order and superconductivity near an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point using sign-problem-free Quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We establish that, when the electronic dispersion is particle-hole symmetric, the system has an emergent SU(2) symmetry that implies a degeneracy between $d$-wave superconductivity and charge order with $d$-wave form factor. Deviations from particle-hole symmetry, however, rapidly lift this degeneracy, despite the fact that the SU(2) symmetry is preserved at low energies. As a result, we find a strong suppression of charge order caused by the competing, leading superconducting instability. Across the antiferromagnetic phase transition, we also observe a shift in the charge order wave-vector from diagonal to axial. We discuss the implications of our results to the universal phase diagram of antiferromagnetic quantum-critical metals and to the elucidation of the charge order experimentally observed in the cuprates.
  • We show that carbon nanotubes (CNT) can be driven through a topological phase transition using either strain or a magnetic field. This can naturally lead to Jackiw-Rebbi soliton states carrying fractionalized charges, similar to those found in a domain wall in the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model, in a setup with a spatially inhomogeneous strain and an axial field. Two types of fractionalized states can be formed at the interface between regions with different strain: a spin-charge separated state with integer charge and spin zero (or zero charge and spin $\pm \hbar/2$), and a state with charge $\pm e/2$ and spin $\pm \hbar/4$. The latter state requires spin-orbit coupling in the CNT. We show that in our setup, the precise quantization of the fractionalized interface charges is a consequence of the symmetry of the CNT under a combination of a spatial rotation by $\pi$ and time reversal. Finally, we comment on the effects of many-body interaction on this phenomena.
  • We study the dynamic response of a two-dimensional system of itinerant fermions in the vicinity of a uniform ($\mathbf{Q}=0$) Ising nematic quantum critical point of $d-$wave symmetry. The nematic order parameter is not a conserved quantity, and this permits a nonzero value of the fermionic polarization in the $d-$wave channel even for vanishing momentum and finite frequency: $\Pi(\mathbf{q} = 0,\Omega_m) \neq 0$. For weak coupling between the fermions and the nematic order parameter (i.e. the coupling is small compared to the Fermi energy), we perturbatively compute $\Pi (\mathbf{q} = 0,\Omega_m) \neq 0$ over a parametrically broad range of frequencies where the fermionic self-energy $\Sigma (\omega)$ is irrelevant, and use Eliashberg theory to compute $\Pi (\mathbf{q} = 0,\Omega_m)$ in the non-Fermi liquid regime at smaller frequencies, where $\Sigma (\omega) > \omega$. We find that $\Pi(\mathbf{q}=0,\Omega)$ is a constant, plus a frequency dependent correction that goes as $|\Omega|$ at high frequencies, crossing over to $|\Omega|^{1/3}$ at lower frequencies. The $|\Omega|^{1/3}$ scaling holds also in a non-Fermi liquid regime. The non-vanishing of $\Pi (\mathbf{q}=0, \Omega)$ gives rise to additional structure in the imaginary part of the nematic susceptibility $\chi^{''} (\mathbf{q}, \Omega)$ at $\Omega > v_F q$, in marked contrast to the behavior of the susceptibility for a conserved order parameter. This additional structure may be detected in Raman scattering experiments in the $d-$wave geometry.
  • We study two-terminal transport through two-dimensional periodically driven systems in which all bulk Floquet eigenstates are localized by disorder. We focus on the Anomalous Floquet-Anderson Insulator (AFAI) phase, a topologically-nontrivial phase within this class, which hosts topologically protected chiral edge modes coexisting with its fully localized bulk. We show that the unique properties of the AFAI yield remarkable far-from-equilibrium transport signatures: for a large bias between leads, a quantized amount of charge is transported through the system each driving period. Upon increasing the bias, the chiral Floquet edge mode connecting source to drain becomes fully occupied and the current rapidly approaches its quantized value.
  • We construct a two-dimensional lattice model of fermions coupled to Ising ferromagnetic critical fluctuations. Using extensive sign-problem-free quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the model realizes a continuous itinerant quantum phase transition. In comparison with other similar itinerant quantum critical points (QCPs), our QCP shows much weaker superconductivity tendency with no superconducting state down to the lowest temperature investigated, hence making the system a good platform for the exploration of quantum critical fluctuations. Remarkably, clear signatures of non-Fermi-liquid behavior in the fermion propagators are observed at the QCP. The critical fluctuations at the QCP partially resemble Hertz-Millis-Moriya behavior. However, careful scaling analysis reveals that the QCP belongs to a different universality class, deviating from both (2+1)d Ising and Hertz-Millis-Moriya predictions.
  • Two-dimensional $p_x+ip_y$ topological superconductors host gapless Majorana edge modes, as well as Majorana bound states at the core of $h/2e$ vortices. Here we construct a model realizing the fractional counterpart of this phase: a fractional chiral superconductor. Our model is composed of an array of coupled Rashba wires in the presence of strong interactions, Zeeman field, and proximity coupling to an $s$-wave superconductor. We define the filling factor as $\nu=l_{\text{so}}n/4$, where $n$ is the electronic density and $l_{\text{so}}$ is the spin-orbit length. Focusing on filling $\nu=1/m$, with $m$ being an odd integer, we obtain a tractable model which allows us to study the properties of the bulk and the edge. Using an $\epsilon$-expansion with $m=2+\epsilon$, we show that the bulk Hamiltonian is gapped and that the edge of the sample hosts a chiral $\mathbb{Z}_{2m}$ parafermion theory with central charge $c=\frac{2m-1}{m+1}$. The tunneling density of states associated with this edge theory exhibits an anomalous energy dependence of the form $\omega^{m-1}$. Additionally, we show that $\mathbb{Z}_{2m}$ parafermionic bound states reside at the cores of $h/2e$ vortices. Upon constructing an appropriate Josephson junction in our system, we find that the current-phase relation displays a $4\pi m$ periodicity, reflecting the underlying non-abelian excitations.
  • In several unconventional superconductors, the highest superconducting transition temperature $T_{c}$ is found in a region of the phase diagram where the antiferromagnetic transition temperature extrapolates to zero, signaling a putative quantum critical point. The elucidation of the interplay between these two phenomena - high-$T_{c}$ superconductivity and magnetic quantum criticality - remains an important piece of the complex puzzle of unconventional superconductivity. In this paper, we combine sign-problem-free Quantum Monte Carlo simulations and field-theoretical analytical calculations to unveil the microscopic mechanism responsible for the superconducting instability of a general low-energy model, called spin-fermion model. In this approach, low-energy electronic states interact with each other via the exchange of quantum critical magnetic fluctuations. We find that even in the regime of moderately strong interactions, both the superconducting transition temperature and the pairing susceptibility are governed not by the properties of the entire Fermi surface, but instead by the properties of small portions of the Fermi surface called hot spots. Moreover, $T_{c}$ increases with increasing interaction strength, until it starts to saturate at the crossover from hot-spots dominated to Fermi-surface dominated pairing. Our work provides not only invaluable insights into the system parameters that most strongly affect $T_{c}$, but also important benchmarks to assess the origin of superconductivity in both microscopic models and actual materials.
  • We calculate the scrambling rate $\lambda_L$ and the butterfly velocity $v_B$ associated with the growth of quantum chaos for a solvable large-$N$ electron-phonon system. We study a temperature regime in which the electrical resistivity of this system exceeds the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit and increases linearly with temperature - a sign that there are no long-lived charged quasiparticles - although the phonons remain well-defined quasiparticles. The long-lived phonons determine $\lambda_L$, rendering it parametrically smaller than the theoretical upper-bound $\lambda_L \ll \lambda_{max}=2\pi T/\hbar$. Significantly, the chaos properties seem to be intrinsic - $\lambda_L$ and $v_B$ are the same for electronic and phononic operators. We consider two models - one in which the phonons are dispersive, and one in which they are dispersionless. In either case, we find that $\lambda_L$ is proportional to the inverse phonon lifetime, and $v_B$ is proportional to the effective phonon velocity. The thermal and chaos diffusion constants, $D_E$ and $D_L\equiv v_B^2/\lambda_L$, are always comparable, $D_E \sim D_L$. In the dispersive phonon case, the charge diffusion constant $D_C$ satisfies $D_L\gg D_C$, while in the dispersionless case $D_L \ll D_C$.
  • The paradigmatic example of a continuous quantum phase transition is the transverse field Ising ferromagnet. In contrast to classical critical systems, whose properties depend only on symmetry and the dimension of space, the nature of a quantum phase transition also depends on the dynamics. In the transverse field Ising model, the order parameter is not conserved and increasing the transverse field enhances quantum fluctuations until they become strong enough to restore the symmetry of the ground state. Ising pseudo-spins can represent the order parameter of any system with a two-fold degenerate broken-symmetry phase, including electronic nematic order associated with spontaneous point-group symmetry breaking. Here, we show for the representative example of orbital-nematic ordering of a non-Kramers doublet that an orthogonal strain or a perpendicular magnetic field plays the role of the transverse field, thereby providing a practical route for tuning appropriate materials to a quantum critical point. While the transverse fields are conjugate to seemingly unrelated order parameters, their non-trivial commutation relations with the nematic order parameter, which can be represented by a Berry-phase term in an effective field theory, intrinsically intertwines the different order parameters.
  • We study micromotion in two-dimensional periodically driven systems in which all bulk Floquet eigenstates are localized by disorder. We show that this micromotion gives rise to a quantized time-averaged magnetization density when the system is filled with fermions. Furthermore we find that a quantized current flows around the boundary of any filled region of finite extent. The quantization has a topological origin: we relate the time-averaged magnetization density to the winding number characterizing the new phase identified in Phys. Rev. X 6, 021013 (2016). We thus establish that the winding number invariant can be accessed directly in bulk measurements, and propose an experimental protocol to do so using interferometry in cold atom based realizations.
  • Using determinantal quantum Monte Carlo, we compute the properties of a lattice model with spin $\frac 1 2$ itinerant electrons tuned through a quantum phase transition to an Ising nematic phase. The nematic fluctuations induce superconductivity with a broad dome in the superconducting $T_c$ enclosing the nematic quantum critical point. For temperatures above $T_c$, we see strikingly non-Fermi liquid behavior, including a "nodal - anti nodal dichotomy" reminiscent of that seen in several transition metal oxides. In addition, the critical fluctuations have a strong effect on the low frequency optical conductivity, resulting in behavior consistent with "bad metal" phenomenology.
  • The problem of a quantum Ising degree of freedom coupled to a gapless bosonic mode appears naturally in many one dimensional systems, yet surprisingly little is known how such a coupling affects the Ising quantum critical point. We investigate the fate of the critical point in a regime, where the weak coupling renormalization group (RG) indicates a flow toward strong coupling. Using a renormalization group analysis and numerical density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations we show that, depending on the ratio of velocities of the gapless bosonic mode and the Ising critical fluctuations, the transition may remain continuous or become fluctuation-driven first order. The two regimes are separated by a tri-critical point of a novel type.
  • The correspondence between the edge theory and the entanglement spectrum is firmly established for the chiral topological phases. We study gapped, topologically ordered, non-chiral states with a conserved $U(1)$ charge and show that the entanglement Hamiltonian contains not only the information about topologically distinct edges such phases may admit, but also which of them will be realized in the presence of symmetry breaking/conserving perturbations. We introduce an exactly solvable, charge conserving lattice model of a $\mathbb{Z}_2$ spin liquid and derive its edge theory and the entanglement Hamiltonian, also in the presence of perturbations. We construct a field theory of the edge and study its RG flow. We show the precise extent of the correspondence between the information contained in the entanglement Hamiltonian and the edge theory.
  • We prove that a system of non-interacting electrons proximity coupled to a conventional s-wave superconductor cannot realize a time reversal invariant topological phase. This is done by showing that for such a system, in either one or two dimensions, the topological invariant of the corresponding symmetry class (DIII) is always trivial. Our results suggest that the pursuit of Majorana bound states in time-reversal invariant systems should be aimed at interacting systems or at proximity to unconventional superconductors.
  • We consider a two-dimensional electron gas with strong spin-orbit coupling contacted by two superconducting leads, forming a Josephson junction. We show that in the presence of an in-plane Zeeman field the quasi-one-dimensional region between the two superconductors can support a topological superconducting phase hosting Majorana bound states at its ends. We study the phase diagram of the system as a function of the Zeeman field and the phase difference between the two superconductors (treated as an externally controlled parameter). Remarkably, at a phase difference of $\pi$, the topological phase is obtained for almost any value of the Zeeman field and chemical potential. In a setup where the phase is not controlled externally, we find that the system undergoes a first-order topological phase transition when the Zeeman field is varied. At the transition, the phase difference in the ground state changes abruptly from a value close to zero, at which the system is trivial, to a value close to $\pi$, at which the system is topological. The critical current through the junction exhibits a sharp minimum at the critical Zeeman field, and is therefore a natural diagnostic of the transition. We point out that in presence of a symmetry under a modified mirror reflection followed by time reversal, the system belongs to a higher symmetry class and the phase diagram as a function of the phase difference and the Zeeman field becomes richer.
  • We report on numerically exact determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the onset of spin-density wave (SDW) order in itinerant electron systems captured by a sign-problem-free two-dimensional lattice model. Extensive measurements of the SDW correlations in the vicinity of the phase transition reveal that the critical dynamics of the bosonic order parameter are well described by a dynamical critical exponent z = 2, consistent with Hertz-Millis theory, but are found to follow a finite-temperature dependence that does not fit the predicted behavior of the same theory. The presence of critical SDW fluctuations is found to have a strong impact on the fermionic quasiparticles, giving rise to a dome-shaped superconducting phase near the quantum critical point. In the superconducting state we find a gap function that has an opposite sign between the two bands of the model and is nearly constant along the Fermi surface of each band. Above the superconducting $T_c$ our numerical simulations reveal a nearly temperature and frequency independent self energy causing a strong suppression of the low-energy quasiparticle spectral weight in the vicinity of the hot spots on the Fermi surface. This indicates a clear breakdown of Fermi liquid theory around these points.
  • In the conventional theory of density wave ordering in metals, the onset of spin density wave (SDW) order co-incides with the reconstruction of the Fermi surfaces into small 'pockets'. We present models which display this transition, while also displaying an alternative route between these phases via an intermediate phase with topological order, no broken symmetry, and pocket Fermi surfaces. The models involve coupling emergent gauge fields to a fractionalized SDW order, but retain the canonical electron operator in the underlying Hamiltonian. We establish an intimate connection between the suppression of certain defects in the SDW order, and the presence of Fermi surface sizes distinct from the Luttinger value in Fermi liquids. We discuss the relevance of such models to the physics of the hole-doped cuprates near optimal doping.
  • We study one-dimensional topological superconductivity in the presence of time-reversal symmetry. This phase is characterized by having a bulk gap, while supporting a Kramers' pair of zero-energy Majorana bound states at each of its ends. We present a general simple model which is driven into this topological phase in the presence of repulsive electron-electron interactions. We further propose two experimental setups and show that they realize this model at low energies. The first setup is a narrow two-dimensional topological insulator partially covered by a conventional s-wave superconductor, and the second is a semiconductor wire in proximity to an s-wave superconductor. These systems can therefore be used to realize and probe the time-reversal invariant topological superconducting phase. The effect of interactions is studied using both a mean-field approach and a renormalization group analysis.
  • Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the $4\pi$-periodic $dc$ Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching current measurements.
  • The electron dynamics in metals are usually well described by the semiclassical approximation for long-lived quasiparticles. However, in some metals, the scattering rate of the electrons at elevated temperatures becomes comparable to the Fermi energy; then, this approximation breaks down, and the full quantum-mechanical nature of the electrons must be considered. In this work, we study a solvable, large-$N$ electron-phonon model, which at high temperatures enters the non-quasiparticle regime. In this regime, the model exhibits "resistivity saturation" to a temperature-independent value of the order of the quantum of resistivity - the first analytically tractable model to do so. The saturation is not due to a fundamental limit on the electron lifetime, but rather to the appearance of a second conductivity channel. This is suggestive of the phenomenological "parallel resistor formula", known to describe the resistivity of a variety of saturating metals.
  • The Ising nematic quantum critical point (QCP) associated with the zero temperature transition from a symmetric to a nematic {\it metal} is an exemplar of metallic quantum criticality. We have carried out a minus sign-free quantum Monte Carlo study of this QCP for a two dimensional lattice model with sizes up to $24\times 24$ sites. The system remains non-superconducting down to the lowest accessible temperatures. The results exhibit critical scaling behavior over the accessible ranges of temperature, (imaginary) time, and distance. This scaling behavior has remarkable similarities with recently measured properties of the Fe-based superconductors proximate to their putative nematic QCP.