• We solve the optimal control problem of a one-dimensional reflected stochastic differential equation, whose coefficients can be path dependent. The value function of this problem is characterized by a backward stochastic partial differential equation (BSPDE) with Neumann boundary conditions. We prove the existence and uniqueness of sufficiently regular solution for this BSPDE, which is then used to construct the optimal feedback control. In fact we prove a more general result: The existence and uniqueness of strong solution for the Neumann problem for general nonlinear BSPDEs, which might be of interest even out of the current context.
  • In [Azimzadeh, P., and P. A. Forsyth. "Weakly chained matrices, policy iteration, and impulse control." SIAM J. Num. Anal. 54.3 (2016): 1341-1364], we outlined the theory and implementation of computational methods for implicit schemes for Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman quasi-variational inequalities (HJBQVIs). No convergence proofs were given therein. This work closes the gap by giving rigorous proofs of convergence. We do so by introducing the notion of nonlocal consistency and appealing to a Barles-Souganidis type analysis. Our results rely only on a well-known comparison principle and are independent of the specific form of the intervention operator.
  • We use the Markov chain approximation method to construct approximations for the solution of the mean field game (MFG) with reflecting barriers studied in Bayraktar, Budhiraja, and Cohen (2017). The MFG is formulated in terms of a controlled reflected diffusion with a cost function that depends on the reflection terms in addition to the standard variables: state, control, and the mean field term. This MFG arises from the asymptotic analysis of an $N$-player game for single server queues with strategic servers. By showing that our scheme is an almost contraction, we establish the convergence of this numerical scheme over a small time interval.
  • This paper studies the utility maximization on the terminal wealth with random endowments and proportional transaction costs. To deal with unbounded random payoffs from some illiquid claims, we propose to work with the acceptable portfolios defined via the consistent price system (CPS) such that the liquidation value processes stay above some stochastic thresholds. In the market consisting of one riskless bond and one risky asset, we obtain a type of super-hedging result. Based on this characterization of the primal space, the existence and uniqueness of the optimal solution for the utility maximization problem are established using the duality approach. As an important application of the duality theorem, we provide some sufficient conditions for the existence of a shadow price process with random endowments in a generalized form as well as in the usual sense using acceptable portfolios.
  • Oft-cited causes of mini-flash crashes include human errors, endogenous feedback loops, the nature of modern liquidity provision, fundamental value shocks, and market fragmentation. We develop a mathematical model which captures aspects of the first three explanations. Empirical features of recent mini-flash crashes are present in our framework. For example, there are periods when no such events will occur. If they do, even just before their onset, market participants may not know with certainty that a disruption will unfold. Our mini-flash crashes can materialize in both low and high trading volume environments and may be accompanied by a partial synchronization in order submission. Instead of adopting a classically-inspired equilibrium approach, we borrow ideas from the optimal execution literature. Each of our agents begins with beliefs about how his own trades impact prices and how prices would move in his absence. They, along with other market participants, then submit orders which are executed at a common venue. Naturally, this leads us to explicitly distinguish between how prices actually evolve and our agents' opinions. In particular, every agent's beliefs will be expressly incorrect.
  • We propose notions of minimax and viscosity solutions for a class of fully nonlinear path-dependent PDEs with nonlinear, monotone, and coercive operators on Hilbert space. Our main result is well-posedness (existence, uniqueness, and stability) for minimax solutions. A particular novelty is a suitable combination of minimax and viscosity solution techniques in the proof of the comparison principle. One of the main difficulties, the lack of compactness in infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces, is circumvented by working with suitable compact subsets of our path space. As an application, our theory makes it possible to employ the dynamic programming approach to study optimal control problems for a fairly general class of (delay) evolution equations in the variational framework. Furthermore, differential games associated to such evolution equations can be investigated following the Krasovskii-Subbotin approach similarly as in finite dimensions.
  • We consider an n-player symmetric stochastic game with weak interaction between the players. Time is continuous and the horizon and the number of states are finite. We show that the value function of each of the players can be approximated by the solution of a partial differential equation called the master equation. Moreover, we analyze the fluctuations of the empirical measure of the states of the players in the game and show that it is governed by a solution to a stochastic differential equation. Finally, we prove the regularity of the master equation, which is required for the above results.
  • We introduce high order Bellman equations, extending classical Bellman equations to the tensor setting. We show that a sufficient condition for the existence and uniqueness of a positive solution is that the tensors appearing in the equation are strong M-tensors. We give a policy iteration algorithm to compute the positive solution. We also extend the notion of weakly chained diagonal dominance to tensors. We prove that a weakly diagonally dominant Z-tensor with nonnegative diagonals is a strong M-tensor if and only if it is weakly chained diagonally dominant. This is analogous to a corresponding result in the matrix setting and tightens a result from [Z. Liping, L. Qi, and G. Zhou. "M-tensors and some applications." SIAM Journal on Matrix Analysis and Applications (2014)]. We apply our results to obtain a provably convergent numerical scheme for an optimal control problem using an "optimize then discretize" approach which outperforms (in both computation time and accuracy) a classical "discretize then optimize" approach. To the best of our knowledge, a link between M-tensors and optimal control has not been previously established.
  • Let $\Omega$ to be one of $\X^{N+1},C[0,1],D[0,1]$: a product of Polish spaces, space of continuous functions from $[0,1]$ to a subset of $\mathbb{R}^d$, and space of RCLL (right-continuous with left limits) functions from $[0,1]$ to $\mathbb{R}^d$ respectively. We consider the existence of a probability measure $P$ on $\Omega$ such that $P$ has the given marginals $\alpha$ and $\beta$ and satisfies some other convex transport constraints, which is given by $\Gamma$. The main application we have in mind is the martingale optimal transport problem with when the martingales are assumed to have bounded volatility/quadratic variation. We show that such probability measure exists if and only if the $\alpha$ average of so-called $G$-expectation of bounded uniformly continuous and bounded functions with respect to the measures in $\Gamma$ is less than their $\beta$ average. As a byproduct, we get a necessary and sufficient condition for the Skorokhod embedding for bounded stopping times.
  • Inspired by Strotz's consistent planning strategy, we formulate the infinite horizon mean-variance stopping problem as a subgame perfect Nash equilibrium in order to determine time consistent strategies with no regret. Equilibria among stopping times or randomized stopping times may not exist. This motivates us to consider the notion of liquidation strategies, which lets the stopping right to be divisible. We then argue that the mean-standard deviation variant of this problem makes more sense for this type of strategies in terms of time consistency. It turns out that an equilibrium liquidation strategy always exists. We then analyze whether optimal equilibrium liquidation strategies exist and whether they are unique and observe that neither may hold.
  • Since most of the traded options on individual stocks is of American type it is of interest to generalize the results obtained in semi-static trading to the case when one is allowed to statically trade American options. However, this problem has proved to be elusive so far because of the asymmetric nature of the positions of holding versus shorting such options. Here we provide a unified framework and generalize the fundamental theorem of asset pricing (FTAP) and hedging dualities in arXiv:1502.06681 (to appear in Annals of Applied Probability) to the case where the investor can also short American options. Following arXiv:1502.06681, we assume that the longed American options are divisible. As for the shorted American options, we show that the divisibility plays no role regarding arbitrage property and hedging prices. Then using the method of enlarging probability spaces proposed in arXiv:1604.05517, we convert the shorted American options to European options, and establish the FTAP and sub- and super-hedging dualities in the enlarged space both with and without model uncertainty.
  • This paper studies the solvability of a class of Dirichlet problem associated with non-linear integro-differential operator. The main ingredient is the probabilistic construction of continuous supersolution via the identification of the continuity set of the exit time operators under Skorohod topology.
  • With model uncertainty characterized by a convex, possibly non-dominated set of probability measures, the agent minimizes the cost of hedging a path dependent contingent claim with given expected success ratio, in a discrete-time, semi-static market of stocks and options. Based on duality results which link quantile hedging to a randomized composite hypothesis test, an arbitrage-free discretization of the market is proposed as an approximation. The discretized market has a dominating measure, which guarantees the existence of the optimal hedging strategy and helps numerical calculation of the quantile hedging price. As the discretization becomes finer, the approximate quantile hedging price converges and the hedging strategy is asymptotically optimal in the original market.
  • We consider a large queueing system that consists of many strategic servers that are weakly interacting. Each server processes jobs from its unique critically loaded buffer and controls the rate of arrivals and departures associated with its queue to minimize its expected cost. The rates and the cost functions in addition to depending on the control action, can depend, in a symmetric fashion, on the size of the individual queue and the empirical measure of the states of all queues in the system. In order to determine an approximate Nash equilibrium for this finite player game we construct a Lasry-Lions type mean-field game (MFG) for certain reflected diffusions that governs the limiting behavior. Under conditions, we establish the convergence of the Nash-equilibrium value for the finite size queuing system to the value of the MFG.
  • In the multisensor sequential change detection problem, a disruption occurs in an environment monitored by multiple sensors. This disruption induces a change in the observations of an unknown subset of sensors. In the Byzantine version of this problem, which is the focus of this work, it is further assumed that the postulated change-point model may be misspecified for an unknown subset of sensors. The problem then is to detect the change quickly and reliably, for any possible subset of affected sensors, even if the misspecified sensors are controlled by an adversary. Given a user-specified upper bound on the number of compromised sensors, we propose and study three families of sequential change-detection rules for this problem. These are designed and evaluated under a generalization of Lorden's criterion, where conditional expected detection delay and expected time to false alarm are both computed in the worst-case scenario for the compromised sensors. The first-order asymptotic performance of these procedures is characterized as the worst-case false alarm rate goes to 0. The insights from these theoretical results are corroborated by a simulation study.
  • In this paper, the problem of quickly detecting an abrupt change on a stochastic process under Bayesian framework is considered. Different from the classic Bayesian quickest change-point detection problem, this paper considers the case where there is uncertainty about the post-change distribution. Specifically, the observer only knows that the post-change distribution belongs to a parametric distribution family but he does not know the true value of the post-change parameter. In this scenario, we propose two multi-chart detection procedures, termed as M-SR procedure and modified M-SR procedure respectively, and show that these two procedures are asymptotically optimal when the post-change parameter belongs to a finite set and are asymptotically $\epsilon-$optimal when the post-change parameter belongs to a compact set with finite measure. Both algorithms can be calculated efficiently as their detection statistics can be updated recursively. We then extend the study to consider the multi-source monitoring problem with unknown post-change parameters. When those monitored sources are mutually independent, we propose a window-based modified M-SR detection procedure and show that the proposed detection method is first-order asymptotically optimal when post-change parameters belong to finite sets. We show that both computation and space complexities of the proposed algorithm increase only linearly with respect to the number of sources.
  • We analyze an optimal stopping problem with a constraint on the expected cost. When the reward function and cost function are Lipschitz continuous in state variable, we show that the value of such an optimal stopping problem is a continuous function in current state and in budget level. Then we derive a dynamic programming principle (DPP) for the value function in which the conditional expected cost acts as an additional state process. As the optimal stopping problem with expectation constraint can be transformed to a stochastic optimization problem with supermartingale controls, we explore a second DPP of the value function and thus resolve an open question recently raised in [S. Ankirchner, M. Klein, and T. Kruse, A verification theorem for optimal stopping problems with expectation constraints, Appl. Math. Optim., 2017, pp. 1-33]. Based on these two DPPs, we characterize the value function as a viscosity solution to the related fully non-linear parabolic Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation.
  • We solve the martingale optimal transport problem for cost functionals represented by optimal stopping problems. The measure-valued martingale approach developed in ArXiv: 1507.02651 allows us to obtain an equivalent infinite-dimensional controller-stopper problem. We use the stochastic Perron's method and characterize the finite dimensional approximation as a viscosity solution to the corresponding HJB equation. It turns out that this solution is the concave envelope of the cost function with respect to the atoms of the terminal law. We demonstrate the results by finding explicit solutions for a class of cost functions.
  • We solve the problem of optimal stopping of a Brownian motion subject to the constraint that the stopping time's distribution is a given measure consisting of finitely-many atoms. In particular, we show that this problem can be converted to a finite sequence of state-constrained optimal control problems with additional states corresponding to the conditional probability of stopping at each possible terminal time. The proof of this correspondence relies on a new variation of the dynamic programming principle for state-constrained problems which avoids measurable selection. We emphasize that distribution constraints lead to novel and interesting mathematical problems on their own, but also demonstrate an application in mathematical finance to model-free superhedging with an outlook on volatility.
  • We consider the super-hedging price of an American option in a discrete-time market in which stocks are available for dynamic trading and European options are available for static trading. We show that the super-hedging price $\pi$ is given by the supremum over the prices of the American option under randomized models. That is, $\pi=\sup_{(c_i,Q_i)_i}\sum_ic_i\phi^{Q_i}$, where $c_i \in \mathbb{R}_+$ and the martingale measure $Q^i$ are chosen such that $\sum_i c_i=1$ and $\sum_i c_iQ_i$ prices the European options correctly, and $\phi^{Q_i}$ is the price of the American option under the model $Q_i$. Our result generalizes the example given in ArXiv:1604.02274 that the highest model based price can be considered as a randomization over models.
  • How do large-scale participants in parimutuel wagering events affect the house and ordinary bettors? A standard narrative suggests that they may temporarily benefit the former at the expense of the latter. To approach this problem, we begin by developing a model based on the theory of large generalized games. Constrained only by their budgets, a continuum of diffuse (ordinary) players and a single atomic (large-scale) player simultaneously wager to maximize their expected profits according to their individual beliefs. Our main theoretical result gives necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of a pure-strategy Nash equilibrium. Using this framework, we analyze our question in concrete scenarios. First, we study a situation in which both predicted effects are observed. Neither is always observed in our remaining examples, suggesting the need for a more nuanced view of large-scale participants.
  • On a filtered probability space $(\Omega,\mathcal{F},P,\mathbb{F}=(\mathcal{F}_t)_{t=0,\dotso,T})$, we consider stopper-stopper games $\overline V:=\inf_{\Rho\in\bT^{ii}}\sup_{\tau\in\T}\E[U(\Rho(\tau),\tau)]$ and $\underline V:=\sup_{\Tau\in\bT^i}\inf_{\rho\in\T}\E[U(\Rho(\tau),\tau)]$ in discrete time, where $U(s,t)$ is $\mathcal{F}_{s\vee t}$-measurable instead of $\mathcal{F}_{s\wedge t}$-measurable as is often assumed in the literature, $\T$ is the set of stopping times, and $\bT^i$ and $\bT^{ii}$ are sets of mappings from $\T$ to $\T$ satisfying certain non-anticipativity conditions. We convert the problems into a corresponding Dynkin game, and show that $\overline V=\underline V=V$, where $V$ is the value of the Dynkin game. We also get the optimal $\Rho\in\bT^{ii}$ and $\Tau\in\bT^i$ for $\overline V$ and $\underline V$ respectively.
  • In this paper we develop two numerical methods for optimal stopping in the framework of one dimensional diffusion. Both of the methods use the Skorohod embedding in order to construct recombining tree approximations for diffusions with general coefficients. This technique allows us to determine convergence rates and construct nearly optimal stopping times which are optimal at the same rate. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of our schemes on several models
  • We analyze the asymptotic behavior for a system of fully nonlinear parabolic and elliptic quasi variational inequalities. These equations are related to robust switching control problems introduced in [3]. We prove that, as time horizon goes to infinity (resp. discount factor goes to zero) the long run average solution to the parabolic system (resp. the limiting discounted solution to the elliptic system) is characterized by a solution of a nonlinear system of ergodic variational inequalities. Our results hold under a dissipativity condition and without any non degeneracy assumption on the diffusion term. Our approach uses mainly probabilistic arguments and in particular a dual randomized game representation for the solution to the system of variational inequalities.
  • This paper studies the market viability with proportional transaction costs. Instead of requiring the existence of strictly consistent price systems (SCPS) as in the literature, we show that strictly consistent local martingale systems (SCLMS) can successfully serve as the dual elements such that the market viability can be verified. We introduce two weaker notions of no arbitrage conditions on market models named no unbounded profit with bounded risk (NUPBR) and no local arbitrage with bounded portfolios (NLABP). In particular, we show that the NUPBR and NLABP conditions in the robust sense for the smaller bid-ask spreads is the equivalent characterization of the existence of SCLMS for general market models. We also discuss the implications for the utility maximization problem.