• We investigate core-collapse supernova (CCSN) nucleosynthesis with self-consistent, axisymmetric (2D) simulations performed using the radiation-hydrodynamics code Chimera. Computational costs have traditionally constrained the evolution of the nuclear composition within multidimensional CCSN models to, at best, a 14-species $\alpha$-network capable of tracking only $(\alpha,\gamma)$ reactions from $^{4}$He to $^{60}$Zn. Such a simplified network limits the ability to accurately evolve detailed composition and neutronization or calculate the nuclear energy generation rate. Lagrangian tracer particles are commonly used to extend the nuclear network evolution by incorporating more realistic networks in post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations. However, limitations such as poor spatial resolution of the tracer particles, inconsistent thermodynamic evolution, including misestimation of expansion timescales, and uncertain determination of the multidimensional mass-cut at the end of the simulation impose uncertainties inherent to this approach. We present a detailed analysis of the impact of such uncertainties for four self-consistent axisymmetric CCSN models initiated from stellar metallicity, non-rotating progenitors of 12 $M_\odot$, 15 $M_\odot$, 20 $M_\odot$, and 25 $M_\odot$ and evolved with the smaller $\alpha$-network to more than 1 s after the launch of an explosion.
  • In this Letter, we report on the gravitational wave signal computed in the context of an $ab$ $initio$, three-dimensional simulation of a core collapse supernova explosion, beginning with a 15M$_\odot$ star and using state-of-the-art weak interactions. The simulation was performed with our neutrino hydrodynamics code Chimera. We discuss the potential for detection of our predicted gravitational signal by the current generation of gravitational wave detectors.
  • We present four ab initio axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations for 12, 15, 20, and 25 $M_\odot$ progenitors. All of the simulations yield explosions and have been evolved for at least 1.2 seconds after core bounce and 1 second after material first becomes unbound. Simulations were computed with our Chimera code employing spectral neutrino transport, special and general relativistic transport effects, and state-of-the-art neutrino interactions. Continuing the evolution beyond 1 second allows explosions to develop more fully and the processes powering the explosions to become more clearly evident. We compute explosion energy estimates, including the binding energy of the stellar envelope outside the shock, of 0.34, 0.88, 0.38, and 0.70 B ($10^{51}$ ergs) and increasing at 0.03, 0.15, 0.19, and 0.52 B s$^{-1}$, respectively, for the 12, 15, 20, and 25 $M_\odot$ models. Three models developed pronounced prolate shock morphologies, while the 20 $M_\odot$ model, though exhibiting lobes and accretion streams like the other models, develops an approximately spherical, off-center shock as the explosion begins and then becomes moderately prolate $\sim$600 ms after bounce. This reduces the explosion energy relative to the other models by reducing mass accretion during the critical explosion power-up phase. We examine the growth of the explosion energy in our models through detailed analyses of the energy sources and flows. We find that the 12 and 20 $M_\odot$ models have explosion energies comparable to that of the lower range of observed explosion energies while the 15 and 25 $M_\odot$ models are within the range of observed explosion energies, particularly considering the rate at which their explosion energies are increasing. The ejected $^{56}$Ni masses given by our models are all within observational limits as are the proto-neutron star masses and kick velocities. (Truncated)
  • We present gravitational wave and neutrino signatures obtained in our first principle 3D core-collapse supernova simulation of 15M non-rotating progenitor with Chimera code. Observations of neutrinos emitted by the forming neutron star, and gravitational waves, which are produced by hydrodynamic instabilities is the only way to get direct information about the supernova engine. Both GW and neutrino signals show different phases of supernova evolution.
  • We present results from an ab initio three-dimensional, multi-physics core collapse supernova simulation for the case of a 15 M progenitor. Our simulation includes multi-frequency neutrino transport with state-of-the-art neutrino interactions in the "ray-by-ray" approximation, and approximate general relativity. Our model exhibits a neutrino-driven explosion. The shock radius begins an outward trajectory at approximately 275 ms after bounce, giving the first indication of a developing explosion in the model. The onset of this shock expansion is delayed relative to our two-dimensional counterpart model, which begins at approximately 200 ms after core bounce. At a time of 441 ms after bounce, the angle-averaged shock radius in our three-dimensional model has reached 751 km. Further quantitative analysis of the outcomes in this model must await further development of the post-bounce dynamics and a simulation that will extend well beyond 1 s after stellar core bounce, based on the results for the same progenitor in the context of our two-dimensional, counterpart model. This more complete analysis will determine whether or not the explosion is robust and whether or not observables such as the explosion energy, 56Ni mass, etc. are in agreement with observations. Nonetheless, the onset of explosion in our ab initio three-dimensional multi-physics model with multi-frequency neutrino transport and general relativity is encouraging.
  • We have performed ab initio neutrino radiation hydrodynamics simulations in three and two spatial dimensions (3D and 2D) of core-collapse supernovae from the same 15 $M_\odot$ progenitor through 440 ms after core bounce. Both 3D and 2D models achieve explosions, however, the onset of explosion (shock revival) is delayed by $\sim$100 ms in 3D relative to the 2D counterpart and the growth of the diagnostic explosion energy is slower. This is consistent with previously reported 3D simulations utilizing iron-core progenitors with dense mantles. In the $\sim$100 ms before the onset of explosion, diagnostics of neutrino heating and turbulent kinetic energy favor earlier explosion in 2D. During the delay, the angular scale of convective plumes reaching the shock surface grows and explosion in 3D is ultimately lead by a single, large-angle plume, giving the expanding shock a directional orientation not dissimilar from those imposed by axial symmetry in 2D simulations. We posit that shock revival and explosion in the 3D simulation may be delayed until sufficiently large plumes form, whereas such plumes form more rapidly in 2D, permitting earlier explosions.
  • We present the gravitational waveforms computed in ab initio two-dimensional core collapse supernova models evolved with the Chimera code for progenitor masses between 12 and 25 solar masses. All models employ multi-frequency neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray approximation, state-of-the-art weak interaction physics, relativistic transport corrections such as the gravitational redshift of neutrinos, two-dimensional hydrodynamics with the commensurate relativistic corrections, Newtonian self-gravity with a general relativistic monopole correction, and the Lattimer-Swesty equation of state with 220 MeV compressibility, and begin with the most recent Woosley-Heger nonrotating progenitors in this mass range. All of our models exhibit robust explosions. Therefore, our waveforms capture all stages of supernova development: 1) a relatively short and weak prompt signal, 2) a quiescent stage, 3) a strong signal due to convection and SASI activity, 4) termination of active accretion onto the proto-neutron star, and 5) a slowly increasing tail that reaches a saturation value. Fourier decomposition shows that the gravitational wave signals we predict should be observable by AdvLIGO for Galactic events across the range of progenitors considered here. The fundamental limitation of these models is in their imposition of axisymmetry. Further progress will require counterpart three-dimensional models, which are underway.
  • We have been working within the fundamental paradigm that core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) may be neutrino driven, since the first suggestion of this by Colgate and White nearly five decades ago. Computational models have become increasingly sophisticated, first in one spatial dimension assuming spherical symmetry, then in two spatial dimensions assuming axisymmetry, and now in three spatial dimensions with no imposed symmetries. The increase in the number of spatial dimensions has been accompanied by an increase in the physics included in the models, and an increase in the sophistication with which this physics has been modeled. Computation has played an essential role in the development of CCSN theory, not simply for the obvious reason that such multidimensional, multi-physics, nonlinear events cannot possibly be fully captured analytically, but for its role in discovery. In particular, the discovery of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) through computation about a decade ago has impacted all simulations performed since then. Today, we appear to be at a threshold, where neutrinos, neutrino-driven convection, and the SASI, working together over time scales significantly longer than had been anticipated in the past, are able to generate explosions, and in some cases, robust explosions, in a number of axisymmetric models. But how will this play out in three dimensions? Early results from the first three-dimensional (3D), multi-physics simulation of the "Oak Ridge" group are promising. I will discuss the essential components of today's models and the requirements of realistic CCSN modeling, present results from our one-, two-, and three-dimensional models, place our models in context with respect to other efforts around the world, and discuss short- and long-term next steps.
  • We investigate core-collapse supernova (CCSN) nucleosynthesis in polar axisymmetric simulations using the multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics code CHIMERA. Computational costs have traditionally constrained the evolution of the nuclear composition in CCSN models to, at best, a 14-species $\alpha$-network. Such a simplified network limits the ability to accurately evolve detailed composition, neutronization and the nuclear energy generation rate. Lagrangian tracer particles are commonly used to extend the nuclear network evolution by incorporating more realistic networks in post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations. Limitations such as poor spatial resolution of the tracer particles, estimation of the expansion timescales, and determination of the "mass-cut" at the end of the simulation impose uncertainties inherent to this approach. We present a detailed analysis of the impact of these uncertainties on post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations and implications for future models.
  • We summarize the results of core collapse supernova theory from one-, two-, and three-dimensional models and provide a snapshot of the field at this time. We also present results from the "Oak Ridge" group in this context. Studies in both one and two spatial dimensions define the necessary} physics that must be included in core collapse supernova models: a general relativistic treatment of gravity (at least an approximate one), spectral neutrino transport, including relativistic effects such as gravitational redshift, and a complete set of neutrino weak interactions that includes state-of-the-art electron capture on nuclei and energy-exchanging scattering on electrons and nucleons. Whether or not the necessarily approximate treatment of this physics in current models that include it is sufficient remains to be determined in the context of future models that remove the approximations. We summarize the results of the Oak Ridge group's two-dimensional supernova models. In particular, we demonstrate that robust neutrino-driven explosions can be obtained. We also demonstrate that our predictions of the explosion energies and remnant neutron star masses are in agreement with observations, although a much larger number of models must be developed before more confident conclusions can be made. We provide preliminary results from our ongoing three dimensional model with the same physics. Finally, we speculate on future outcomes and directions.
  • We present an overview of four ab initio axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations employing detailed spectral neutrino transport computed with our CHIMERA code and initiated from Woosley & Heger (2007) progenitors of mass 12, 15, 20, and 25 M_sol. All four models exhibit shock revival over \sim 200 ms (leading to the possibility of explosion), driven by neutrino energy deposition. Hydrodynamic instabilities that impart substantial asymmetries to the shock aid these revivals, with convection appearing first in the 12 M_sol model and the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) appearing first in the 25 M_sol model. Three of the models have developed pronounced prolate morphologies (the 20 M_sol model has remained approximately spherical). By 500 ms after bounce the mean shock radii in all four models exceed 3,000 km and the diagnostic explosion energies are 0.33, 0.66, 0.65, and 0.70 Bethe (B = $10^{51}$ ergs) for the 12, 15, 20, and 25 M_sol models, respectively, and are increasing. The three least massive of our models are already sufficiently energetic to completely unbind the envelopes of their progenitors (i.e., to explode), as evidenced by our best estimate of their explosion energies, which first become positive at 320, 380, and 440 ms after bounce. By 850 ms the 12 M_sol diagnostic explosion energy has saturated at 0.38 B, and our estimate for the final kinetic energy of the ejecta is \sim 0.3 B, which is comparable to observations for lower-mass progenitors.
  • Ascertaining the core-collapse supernova mechanism is a complex, and yet unsolved, problem dependent on the interaction of general relativity, hydrodynamics, neutrino transport, neutrino-matter interactions, and nuclear equations of state and reaction kinetics. Ab initio modeling of core-collapse supernovae and their nucleosynthetic outcomes requires care in the coupling and approximations of the physical components. We have built our multi-physics CHIMERA code for supernova modeling in 1-, 2-, and 3-D, using ray-by-ray neutrino transport, approximate general relativity, and detailed neutrino and nuclear physics. We discuss some early results from our current series of exploding 2D simulations and our work to perform computationally tractable simulations in 3D using the "Yin-Yang" grid.
  • We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from NIS on electrons. For the accretion phase, non-isoenergetic scattering on free nucleons and pair emission by $e^+e^-$ annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon--nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino--positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear electron capture, $e^+e^-$-annihilation pair emission, and non-isoenergetic scattering on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.
  • Xiaofeng Wang, Lifan Wang, Alexei V. Filippenko, Eddie Baron, Markus Kromer, Dennis Jack, Tianmeng Zhang, Greg Aldering, Pierre Antilogus, David Arnett, Dietrich Baade, Brian J. Barris, Stefano Benetti, Patrice Bouchet, Adam S. Burrows, Ramon Canal, Enrico Cappellaro, Raymond Carlberg, Elisa di Carlo, Peter Challis, Arlin Crotts, John I. Danziger, Massimo Della Valle, Michael Fink, Ryan J. Foley, Claes Fransson, Avishay Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Chris L. Gerardy, Gerson Goldhaber, Mario Hamuy, Wolfgang Hillebrandt, Peter A. Hoeflich, Stephen T. Holland, Daniel E. Holz, John P. Hughes, David J. Jeffery, Saurabh W. Jha, Dan Kasen, Alexei M. Khokhlov, Robert P. Kirshner, Robert Knop, Cecilia Kozma, Kevin Krisciunas, Brian C. Lee, Bruno Leibundgut, Eric J. Lentz, Douglas C. Leonard, Walter H. G. Lewin, Weidong Li, Mario Livio, Peter Lundqvist, Dan Maoz, Thomas Matheson, Paolo Mazzali, Peter Meikle, Gajus Miknaitis, Peter Milne, Stefan Mochnacki, Ken'Ichi Nomoto, Peter E. Nugent, Elaine Oran, Nino Panagia, Saul Perlmutter, Mark M. Phillips, Philip Pinto, Dovi Poznanski, Christopher J. Pritchet, Martin Reinecke, Adam Riess, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Richard Scalzo, Eric M. Schlegel, Brian Schmidt, James Siegrist, Alicia M. Soderberg, Jesper Sollerman, George Sonneborn, Anthony Spadafora, Jason Spyromilio, Richard A. Sramek, Sumner G. Starrfield, Louis G. Strolger, Nicholas B. Suntzeff, Rollin Thomas, John L. Tonry, Amedeo Tornambe, James W. Truran, Massimo Turatto, Michael Turner, Schuyler D. Van Dyk, Kurt Weiler, J. Craig Wheeler, Michael Wood-Vasey, Stan Woosley, Hitoshi Yamaoka
    Feb. 6, 2012 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.HE
    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This dataset provides unique spectral time series down to 2000 Angstrom. Significant diversity is seen in the near maximum-light spectra (~ 2000--3500 Angstrom) for this small sample. The corresponding photometric data, together with archival data from Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope observations, provide further evidence of increased dispersion in the UV emission with respect to the optical. The peak luminosities measured in uvw1/F250W are found to correlate with the B-band light-curve shape parameter dm15(B), but with much larger scatter relative to the correlation in the broad-band B band (e.g., ~0.4 mag versus ~0.2 mag for those with 0.8 < dm15 < 1.7 mag). SN 2004dt is found as an outlier of this correlation (at > 3 sigma), being brighter than normal SNe Ia such as SN 2005cf by ~0.9 mag and ~2.0 mag in the uvw1/F250W and uvm2/F220W filters, respectively. We show that different progenitor metallicity or line-expansion velocities alone cannot explain such a large discrepancy. Viewing-angle effects, such as due to an asymmetric explosion, may have a significant influence on the flux emitted in the UV region. Detailed modeling is needed to disentangle and quantify the above effects.
  • We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using a reduced set of weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus the current state-of-the-art; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has noticeable effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Of these, we find that the omission of observer corrections is particularly detrimental to the potential for neutrino-driven explosions and exhibits a failure to conserve lepton number. Finally, we discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of current, and the requirements for future, multidimensional models.
  • Core-collapse supernova models depend on the details of the nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs just as they depend on the details of the macroscopic physics (transport, hydrodynamics, etc.), numerical methods, and progenitors. We present preliminary results from our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions.
  • The presence of a small amount of hydrogen is expected in most single degenerate scenarios for producing a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). While hydrogen may be detected in very early high resolution optical spectra, in early radio spectra, and in X-ray spectra, here we examine the possibility of detecting hydrogen in early low resolution spectra such as those that will be obtained by proposed large scale searches for nearby SNe Ia. We find that definitive detections will require both very early spectra (less than 5 days after explosion) and perhaps slightly higher amounts of hydrogen than are currently predicted to be mixed into the outer layers of SNe Ia. Thus, the non-detection of hydrogen so far does not in and of itself rule out any current progenitor models. Nevertheless, very early spectra of SNe Ia will provide significant clues to the amount of hydrogen present and hence to the nature of the SN Ia progenitor system. Spectral coverage in both the optical and IR will be required to definitively identify hydrogen in low resolution spectra.
  • We have fit the normal, well observed, Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) SN 1994D with non-LTE spectra of the deflagration model W7. We find that well before maximum luminosity W7 fits the optical spectra of SN 1994D. After maximum brightness the quality of the fits weakens as the spectrum forms in a core rich in iron peak elements. We show the basic structure of W7 is likely to be representative of the typical SN Ia. We have shown that like W7, the typical SN Ia has a layer of unburned C+O composition at v > 15000 \kmps, followed by layers of C-burned and O-burned material with a density structure similar to W7. We present UVOIR (UBVRIJKH) synthetic photometry and colors and compare with observation. We have computed the distance to the host galaxy, NGC 4526, obtaining a distance modulus of \mu = 30.8 \pm 0.3. We discuss further application of this direct measurement of SNe Ia distances. We also discuss some simple modifications to W7 that could improve the quality of the fits to the observations.
  • We present spectral analysis of early observations of the Type IIn supernova 1998S using the general non-local thermodynamic equilibrium atmosphere code \tt PHOENIX}. We model both the underlying supernova spectrum and the overlying circumstellar interaction region and produce spectra in good agreement with observations. The early spectra are well fit by lines produced primarily in the circumstellar region itself, and later spectra are due primarily to the supernova ejecta. Intermediate spectra are affected by both regions. A mass-loss rate of order $\dot M \sim 0.0001-0.001$\msol yr$^{-1}$ is inferred for a wind speed of 100-1000 \kmps. We discuss how future self-consistent models will better clarify the underlying progenitor structure.
  • SN 1984A shows unusually large expansion velocities in lines from freshly synthesized material, relative to typical Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia). SN 1984A is an example of a group of SNe Ia which have very large blue-shifts of the P-Cygni features, but otherwise normal spectra. We have modeled several early spectra of SN 1984A with the multi-purpose NLTE model atmosphere and spectrum synthesis code, PHOENIX. We have used as input two delayed detonation models: CS15DD3 (Iwamoto et al. 1999) and DD21c (Hoeflich, Wheeler & Thielemann 1998). These models show line expansion velocities which are larger than that for a typical deflagration model like W7, which we have previously shown to fit the spectra of normal SNe Ia quite well. We find these delayed detonation models to be reasonable approximations to large absorption feature blue-shift SNe Ia, like SN 1984A. Higher densities of newly synthesized intermediate mass elements at higher velocities, v > 15,000 km/s, are found in delayed detonation models than in deflagration models. We find that this increase in density at high velocities is responsible for the larger blue-shifts in the synthetic spectra. We show that the variations in line width in observed SNe Ia are likely due to density variations in the outer, high-velocity layers of their atmospheres.
  • A comparison of the ratio of the depths of two absorption features in the spectra of TypeIa supernovae (SNe Ia) near the time of maximum brightness with the blueshift of the deep red Si II absorption feature 10 days after maximum shows that the spectroscopic diversity of SNe Ia is multi-dimensional. There is a substantial range of blueshifts at a given value of the depth ratio. We also find that the spectra of a sample of SNe Ia obtained a week before maximum brightness can be arranged in a ``blueshift sequence'' that mimics the time evolution of the pre-maximum-light spectra of an individual SN Ia, the well observed SN 1994D. Within the context of current SN Ia explosion models, we suggest that some of the SNe Ia in our sample were delayed-detonations while others were plain deflagrations.
  • We have calculated a grid of photospheric phase atmospheres of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with metallicities from ten times to one thirtieth the solar metallicity in the C+O layer of the deflagration model, W7. We have modeled the spectra using the multi-purpose NLTE model-atmosphere and spectrum-synthesis code, PHOENIX. We show models for the epochs 7, 10, 15, 20, and 35 days after explosion. When compared to observed spectra obtained at the approximately corresponding epochs these synthetic spectra fit reasonably well. The spectra show variation in the overall level of the UV continuum with lower fluxes for models with higher metallicity in the unburned C+O layer. This is consistent with the classical surface cooling and line blocking effect due to metals in the outer layers of C+O. The UV features also move consistently to the blue with higher metallicity, demonstrating that they are forming at shallower and faster layers in the atmosphere. The potentially most useful effect is the blueward movement of the Si II feature at 6150 Angstrom with increasing C+O layer metallicity. We also demonstrate the more complex effects of metallicity variations by modifying the 54Fe content of the incomplete burning zone in W7 at maximum light. We briefly address some shortcomings of the W7 Finally, we identify that the split in the Ca H+K feature produced in W7 and observed in some SNe Ia is due to a blending effect of Ca II and Si II and does not necessarily represent a complex abundance or ionization effect in Ca II. amodel when compared to observations.
  • The observed map of 1.809 MeV gamma-rays from radioactive Al-26 (Oberlack et al, 1996) shows clear evidence of Galactic plane origin with an uneven distribution. We have simulated the map using a Monte Carlo technique together with simple assumptions about the spatial distributions and yields of Al-26 sources (clustered core-collapse supernovae and Wolf Rayet stars; low- and high-mass AGB stars; and novae). Although observed structures (e.g., tangents to spiral arms, bars, and known star-forming regions) are not included in the model, our simulated gamma-ray distribution bears resemblance to the observed distribution. The major difference is that the model distribution has a strong smooth background along the Galactic plane from distant sources in the disk of the Galaxy. We suggest that the smooth background is to be expected, and probably has been suppressed by background subtraction in the observed map. We have also found an upper limit of 1 Msun to the contribution of flux from low-yield, smoothly distributed sources (low-mass AGB stars and novae).