• Artificial intelligence offers the potential to automate challenging data-processing tasks in collider physics. To establish its prospects, we explore to what extent deep learning with convolutional neural networks can discriminate quark and gluon jets better than observables designed by physicists. Our approach builds upon the paradigm that a jet can be treated as an image, with intensity given by the local calorimeter deposits. We supplement this construction by adding color to the images, with red, green and blue intensities given by the transverse momentum in charged particles, transverse momentum in neutral particles, and pixel-level charged particle counts. Overall, the deep networks match or outperform traditional jet variables. We also find that, while various simulations produce different quark and gluon jets, the neural networks are surprisingly insensitive to these differences, similar to traditional observables. This suggests that the networks can extract robust physical information from imperfect simulations.
  • We introduce the energy flow polynomials: a complete set of jet substructure observables which form a discrete linear basis for all infrared- and collinear-safe observables. Energy flow polynomials are multiparticle energy correlators with specific angular structures that are a direct consequence of infrared and collinear safety. We establish a powerful graph-theoretic representation of the energy flow polynomials which allows us to design efficient algorithms for their computation. Many common jet observables are exact linear combinations of energy flow polynomials, and we demonstrate the linear spanning nature of the energy flow basis by performing regression for several common jet observables. Using linear classification with energy flow polynomials, we achieve excellent performance on three representative jet tagging problems: quark/gluon discrimination, boosted W tagging, and boosted top tagging. The energy flow basis provides a systematic framework for complete investigations of jet substructure using linear methods.
  • We introduce jet topics: a framework to identify underlying classes of jets from collider data. Because of a close mathematical relationship between distributions of observables in jets and emergent themes in sets of documents, we can apply recent techniques in "topic modeling" to extract jet topics from data with no input from simulation or theory. As a proof-of-concept with parton shower samples, we apply jet topics to determine separate quark and gluon distributions for constituent multiplicity. We also determine separate quark and gluon rapidity spectra from a mixed Z-plus-jet sample. Because jet topics are defined directly from hadron-level multi-differential cross sections, one can predict jet topics from first-principles theoretical calculations, with potential implications for how to define quark and gluon jets beyond leading-logarithmic accuracy. These investigations suggest that jet topics will be useful for extracting underlying jet distributions and fractions in a wide range of contexts at the Large Hadron Collider.
  • A persistent challenge in practical classification tasks is that labelled training sets are not always available. In particle physics, this challenge is surmounted by the use of simulations. These simulations accurately reproduce most features of data, but cannot be trusted to capture all of the complex correlations exploitable by modern machine learning methods. Recent work in weakly supervised learning has shown that simple, low-dimensional classifiers can be trained using only the impure mixtures present in data. Here, we demonstrate that complex, high-dimensional classifiers can also be trained on impure mixtures using weak supervision techniques, with performance comparable to what could be achieved with pure samples. Using weak supervision will therefore allow us to avoid relying exclusively on simulations for high-dimensional classification. This work opens the door to a new regime whereby complex models are trained directly on data, providing direct access to probe the underlying physics.
  • Pileup involves the contamination of the energy distribution arising from the primary collision of interest (leading vertex) by radiation from soft collisions (pileup). We develop a new technique for removing this contamination using machine learning and convolutional neural networks. The network takes as input the energy distribution of charged leading vertex particles, charged pileup particles, and all neutral particles and outputs the energy distribution of particles coming from leading vertex alone. The PUMML algorithm performs remarkably well at eliminating pileup distortion on a wide range of simple and complex jet observables. We test the robustness of the algorithm in a number of ways and discuss how the network can be trained directly on data.
  • Modern machine learning techniques can be used to construct powerful models for difficult collider physics problems. In many applications, however, these models are trained on imperfect simulations due to a lack of truth-level information in the data, which risks the model learning artifacts of the simulation. In this paper, we introduce the paradigm of classification without labels (CWoLa) in which a classifier is trained to distinguish statistical mixtures of classes, which are common in collider physics. Crucially, neither individual labels nor class proportions are required, yet we prove that the optimal classifier in the CWoLa paradigm is also the optimal classifier in the traditional fully-supervised case where all label information is available. After demonstrating the power of this method in an analytical toy example, we consider a realistic benchmark for collider physics: distinguishing quark- versus gluon-initiated jets using mixed quark/gluon training samples. More generally, CWoLa can be applied to any classification problem where labels or class proportions are unknown or simulations are unreliable, but statistical mixtures of the classes are available.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows for communication with security guaranteed by quantum theory. The main theoretical problem in QKD is to calculate the secret key rate for a given protocol. Analytical formulas are known for protocols with symmetries, since symmetry simplifies the analysis. However, experimental imperfections break symmetries, hence the effect of imperfections on key rates is difficult to estimate. Furthermore, it is an interesting question whether (intentionally) asymmetric protocols could outperform symmetric ones. Here, we develop a robust numerical approach for calculating the key rate for arbitrary discrete-variable QKD protocols. Ultimately this will allow researchers to study "unstructured" protocols, that is, those that lack symmetry. Our approach relies on transforming the key rate calculation to the dual optimization problem, which dramatically reduces the number of parameters and hence the calculation time. We illustrate our method by investigating some unstructured protocols for which the key rate was previously unknown.
  • An expression is presented for the relativistic equations of motion, including field gradients, of a particle and its spin with electric and magnetic dipole moments aligned along the spin axis. An electromagnetic duality transformation is used to generalize a Thomas-BMT equation with gradient terms. Corrections to particle dynamics in storage rings for precision $(g-2)$ and electric dipole moment measurements are calculated, and applications to precision particle tracking programs are considered.