• We apply a computationally efficient technique to validate the global structure of the pulsar magnetosphere. In this first of a series of studies, a 3D, computationally intensive, implicit Crank-Nicolson finite-difference scheme is developed. The region of magnetic influence is evolved under the approximation of force-free electrodynamics. The main objective of this paper is to present our code and use it to demonstrate and verify the now widely - accepted global features of a pulsar magnetosphere. Our results qualitatively agree with previously developed time-dependent models for an oblique rotator. In line with earlier studies, we also demonstrate that our simulations can run for many stellar rotations. Once we extend our code, we believe that our implicit approach can be extremely useful to investigate magnetospheres filled with resistive plasma, develop better resolution current sheets and investigate small scale microphysics of pair creation using particle-in-cell techniques.
  • We present a multi-frequency study of the intermediate spiral SAB(r)bc type galaxy NGC 6744, using available data from the Chandra X-Ray telescope, radio continuum data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array and Murchison Widefield Array, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared observations. We identify 117 X-ray sources and 280 radio sources. Of these, we find nine sources in common between the X-ray and radio catalogues, one of which is a faint central black hole with a bolometric radio luminosity similar to the Milky Way's central black hole. We classify 5 objects as supernova remnant candidates, 2 objects as likely supernova remnants, 17 as HII regions, 1 source as an AGN; the remaining 255 radio sources are categorised as background objects and one X-ray source is classified as a foreground star. We find the star-formation rate (SFR) of NGC 6744 to be in the range 2.8 - 4.7 $\rm{M_{\odot}~yr^{-1}}$ signifying the galaxy is still actively forming stars. The specific SFR of NGC 6744 is greater than that of late-type spirals such as the Milky Way, but considerably less that that of a typical starburst galaxy.
  • We describe a double-arc-like X-ray structure lying ~15-30" (~0.8-1.7 kpc) south of the NGC 5195 nucleus visible in the merged exposures of long Chandra pointings of M51. The curvature and orientation of the arcs argues for a nuclear origin. The arcs are radially separated by ~15" (~1$ kpc), but are rotated relative to each other by ~30 deg. From an archival image, we find a slender Halpha-emitting region just outside the outer edge of the outer X-ray arc, suggesting that the X-ray-emitting gas plowed up and displaced the Halpha-emitting material from the galaxy core. Star formation may have commenced in that arc. Halpha emission is present at the inner arc, but appears more complex in structure. In contrast to an explosion expected to be azimuthally symmetric, the X-ray arcs suggest a focused outflow. We interpret the arcs as episodic outbursts from the central super-massive black hole (SMBH). We conclude that NGC 5195 represents the nearest galaxy exhibiting on-going, large-scale outflows of gas, in particular, two episodes of a focused outburst of the SMBH. The arcs represent a clear demonstration of feedback.
  • The recurrent nova U Scorpii most recently erupted in 2010. Our collaboration observed the eruption in bands ranging from the Swift XRT and UVOT w2 (193 nm) to K-band (2200 nm), with a few serendipitous observations stretching down to WISE W2 (4600 nm). Considering the time and wavelength coverage, this is the most comprehensively observed nova eruption to date. We present here the resulting multi-wavelength light curve covering the two months of the eruption as well as a few months into quiescence. For the first time, a U Sco eruption has been followed all the way back to quiescence, leading to the discovery of new features in the light curve, including a second, as-yet-unexplained, plateau in the optical and near-infrared. Using this light curve we show that U Sco nearly fits the broken power law decline predicted by Hachisu & Kato, with decline indices of -1.71 +/- 0.02 and -3.36 +/- 0.14. With our unprecedented multi-wavelength coverage, we construct daily spectral energy distributions and then calculate the total radiated energy of the eruption, E_rad=6.99 (+0.83)(-0.57) * 10^44 erg. From that, we estimate the total amount of mass ejected by the eruption to be m_ej=2.10 (+0.24)(-0.17) * 10^-6 M_solar. We compare this to the total amount of mass accreted by U Sco before the eruption, to determine whether the white dwarf undergoes a net mass loss or gain, but find that the values for the amount of mass accreted are not precise enough to make a useful comparison.
  • Xiaofeng Wang, Lifan Wang, Alexei V. Filippenko, Eddie Baron, Markus Kromer, Dennis Jack, Tianmeng Zhang, Greg Aldering, Pierre Antilogus, David Arnett, Dietrich Baade, Brian J. Barris, Stefano Benetti, Patrice Bouchet, Adam S. Burrows, Ramon Canal, Enrico Cappellaro, Raymond Carlberg, Elisa di Carlo, Peter Challis, Arlin Crotts, John I. Danziger, Massimo Della Valle, Michael Fink, Ryan J. Foley, Claes Fransson, Avishay Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Chris L. Gerardy, Gerson Goldhaber, Mario Hamuy, Wolfgang Hillebrandt, Peter A. Hoeflich, Stephen T. Holland, Daniel E. Holz, John P. Hughes, David J. Jeffery, Saurabh W. Jha, Dan Kasen, Alexei M. Khokhlov, Robert P. Kirshner, Robert Knop, Cecilia Kozma, Kevin Krisciunas, Brian C. Lee, Bruno Leibundgut, Eric J. Lentz, Douglas C. Leonard, Walter H. G. Lewin, Weidong Li, Mario Livio, Peter Lundqvist, Dan Maoz, Thomas Matheson, Paolo Mazzali, Peter Meikle, Gajus Miknaitis, Peter Milne, Stefan Mochnacki, Ken'Ichi Nomoto, Peter E. Nugent, Elaine Oran, Nino Panagia, Saul Perlmutter, Mark M. Phillips, Philip Pinto, Dovi Poznanski, Christopher J. Pritchet, Martin Reinecke, Adam Riess, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Richard Scalzo, Eric M. Schlegel, Brian Schmidt, James Siegrist, Alicia M. Soderberg, Jesper Sollerman, George Sonneborn, Anthony Spadafora, Jason Spyromilio, Richard A. Sramek, Sumner G. Starrfield, Louis G. Strolger, Nicholas B. Suntzeff, Rollin Thomas, John L. Tonry, Amedeo Tornambe, James W. Truran, Massimo Turatto, Michael Turner, Schuyler D. Van Dyk, Kurt Weiler, J. Craig Wheeler, Michael Wood-Vasey, Stan Woosley, Hitoshi Yamaoka
    Feb. 6, 2012 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.HE
    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This dataset provides unique spectral time series down to 2000 Angstrom. Significant diversity is seen in the near maximum-light spectra (~ 2000--3500 Angstrom) for this small sample. The corresponding photometric data, together with archival data from Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope observations, provide further evidence of increased dispersion in the UV emission with respect to the optical. The peak luminosities measured in uvw1/F250W are found to correlate with the B-band light-curve shape parameter dm15(B), but with much larger scatter relative to the correlation in the broad-band B band (e.g., ~0.4 mag versus ~0.2 mag for those with 0.8 < dm15 < 1.7 mag). SN 2004dt is found as an outlier of this correlation (at > 3 sigma), being brighter than normal SNe Ia such as SN 2005cf by ~0.9 mag and ~2.0 mag in the uvw1/F250W and uvm2/F220W filters, respectively. We show that different progenitor metallicity or line-expansion velocities alone cannot explain such a large discrepancy. Viewing-angle effects, such as due to an asymmetric explosion, may have a significant influence on the flux emitted in the UV region. Detailed modeling is needed to disentangle and quantify the above effects.
  • (Abridged) We conducted a Chandra ACIS observation of the nearby Sculptor Group Sd galaxy NGC 7793. At the assumed distance to NGC 7793 of 3.91 Mpc, the limiting unabsorbed luminosity of the detected discrete X-ray sources (0.2-10.0 keV) is approximately 3x10^36 ergs s^-1. A total of 22 discrete sources were detected at the 3-sigma level or greater including one ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX). Based on multiwavelength comparisons, we identify X-ray sources coincident with one SNR, the candidate microquasar N7793-S26, one HII region and two foreground Galactic stars. We also find that the X-ray counterpart to the candidate radio SNR R3 is time-variable in its X-ray emission: we therefore rule out the possibility that this source is a single SNR. A marked asymmetry is seen in the distribution of the discrete sources with the majority lying in the eastern half of this galaxy. All of the sources were analyzed using quantiles to estimate spectral properties and spectra of the four brightest sources (including the ULX) were extracted and analyzed. We searched for time-variability in the X-ray emission of the detected discrete sources using our measured fluxes along with fluxes measured from prior Einstein and ROSAT observations. From this study, three discrete X-ray sources are established to be significantly variable. A spectral analysis of the galaxy's diffuse emission is characterized by a temperature of kT = 0.19-0.25 keV. The luminosity function of the discrete sources shows a slope with an absolute value of Gamma = -0.65+/-0.11 if we exclude the ULX. If the ULX is included, the luminosity function has a long tail to high L_X with a poor-fitting slope of Gamma = -0.62+/-0.2. The ULX-less slope is comparable to the slopes measured for the distributions of NGC 6946 and NGC 2403 but much shallower than the slopes measured for the distributions of IC 5332 and M83.
  • We present Chandra X-ray Observatory archival observations of the supernova remnant 1E0102.2-7219, a young Oxygen-rich remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Combining 28 ObsIDs for 324 ks of total exposure time, we present an ACIS image with an unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio (mean S/N ~ sqrt(S) ~6; maximum S/N > 35) . We search within the remnant, using the source detection software {\sc wavdetect}, for point sources which may indicate a compact object. Despite finding numerous detections of high significance in both broad and narrow band images of the remnant, we are unable to satisfactorily distinguish whether these detections correspond to emission from a compact object. We also present upper limits to the luminosity of an obscured compact stellar object which were derived from an analysis of spectra extracted from the high signal-to-noise image. We are able to further constrain the characteristics of a potential neutron star for this remnant with the results of the analysis presented here, though we cannot confirm the existence of such an object for this remnant.
  • We have carried out optical and X-ray spectral analyses on a sample of 136 candidate optical counterparts of X-ray sources found in five Galactic-bulge fields included in our Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane Survey. We use a combination of optical spectral fitting and quantile X-ray analysis to obtain the hydrogen column density towards each object, and a three-dimensional dust model of the Galaxy to estimate the most probable distance in each case. We present the discovery of a population of stellar coronal emission sources, likely consisting of pre-main sequence, young main sequence and main sequence stars, as well as a component of active binaries of RS CVn or BY Dra type. We identify one candidate quiescent low-mass X-ray binary with a sub-giant companion; we note that this object may also be an RS CVn system. We report the discovery of three new X-ray detected cataclysmic variables (CVs) in the direction of the Galactic Center (at distances ~2kpc). This number is in excess of predictions made with a simple CV model based on a local CV space density of <~ 10^-5 pc^-3, and a scale height ~200pc. We discuss several possible reasons for this observed excess.
  • We describe the X-ray analysis procedure of the on-going Chandra Multiwavelength Plane (ChaMPlane) survey and report the initial results from the analysis of 15 selected anti-Galactic center observations (90 deg < l < 270 deg). We describe the X-ray analysis procedures for ChaMPlane using custom-developed analysis tools appropriate for Galactic sources but also of general use: optimum photometry in crowded fields using advanced techniques for overlapping sources, rigorous astrometry and 95% error circles for combining X-ray images or matching to optical/IR images, and application of quantile analysis for spectral analysis of faint sources. We apply these techniques to 15 anti-Galactic center observations (of 14 distinct fields) in which we have detected 921 X-ray point sources. We present logN-logS distributions and quantile analysis to show that in the hard band (2 - 8 keV) active galactic nuclei dominate the sources. Complete analysis of all ChaMPlane anti-Galactic center fields will be given in a subsequent paper, followed by papers on sources in the Galactic center and Bulge regions.
  • The ChaMPlane survey to identify and analyze the serendipitous X-ray sources in deep Galactic plane fields incorporates the ChaMPlane Optical Survey, which is one of NOAO's Long-term Survey Programs. We started this optical imaging survey in March 2000 and completed it in June 2005. Using the NOAO 4-m telescopes with the Mosaic cameras at CTIO and KPNO, deep images of the ChaMPlane fields are obtained in V, R, I and H-alpha bands. This paper describes the process of observation, data reduction and analysis of fields included in the ChaMPlane Optical Survey, and describes the search for H-alpha emission objects and Chandra optical counterparts. We illustrate these procedures using the ChaMPlane field for the black hole X-ray binary GRO J0422+32 as an example.
  • We briefly describe a serendipitous observation of the little-studied intermediate polar WX Pyx using XMM-Newton. The X-ray spin period is 1557.3 sec, confirming the optical period published in 1996. An orbital period of approximately 5.54 hr is inferred from the separation of the spin-orbit sidelobe components. The soft and hard band spin-folded light curves are nearly sinusoidal in shape. The best-fit spectrum is consistent with a bremsstrahlung temperature of about 18 keV. An upper limit of approximately 300 eV is assigned to the presence of Fe line emission. WX Pyx lies near TX and TV Col in the P_spin-P_orb plane.
  • We present UBVRIJHK photometry and optical spectroscopy of the so-called 'peculiar' Type Ia supernova 1999by in NGC 2841. The observations began one week before visual maximum light which is well-defined by daily observations. The light curves and spectra are similar to those of the prototypical subluminous event SN 1991bg. We find that maximum light in B occurred on 1999 May 10.3 UT (JD 2,451,308.8 +/- 0.3) with B=13.66 +/- 0.02 mag and a color of B_max-V_max=0.51 +/- 0.03 mag. The late-time color implies minimal dust extinction from the host galaxy. Our photometry, when combined with the recent Cepheid distance to NGC 2841 (Macri et al. 2001), gives a peak absolute magnitude of M_B=-17.15 +/- 0.23 mag, making SN 1999by one of the least luminous Type Ia events ever observed. We estimate a decline rate parameter of dm15(B)=1.90 mag, versus 1.93 for SN 1991bg, where 1.10 is typical for so-called 'normal' events. We compare SN 1999by with other subluminous events and find that the B_max-V_max color correlates strongly with the decline rate and may be a more sensitive indicator of luminosity than the fading rate for these objects. We find a good correlation between luminosity and the depth of the spectral feature at 580 nm, which had been attributed solely to Si II. We show that in cooler photospheres the 580 nm feature is dominated by Ti II, which provides a simple physical explanation for the correlation. Using only subluminous Type Ia supernovae we derive a Hubble parameter of H_0=75 +12 -11 km/s Mpc, consistent with values found from brighter events.
  • We present a new technique called "quantile analysis" to classify spectral properties of X-ray sources with limited statistics. The quantile analysis is superior to the conventional approaches such as X-ray hardness ratio or X-ray color analysis to study relatively faint sources or to investigate a certain phase or state of a source in detail, where poor statistics does not allow spectral fitting using a model. Instead of working with predetermined energy bands, we determine the energy values that divide the detected photons into predetermined fractions of the total counts such as median (50%), tercile (33% & 67%), and quartile (25% & 75%). We use these quantiles as an indicator of the X-ray hardness or color of the source. We show that the median is an improved substitute for the conventional X-ray hardness ratio. The median and other quantiles form a phase space, similar to the conventional X-ray color-color diagrams. The quantile-based phase space is more evenly sensitive over various spectral shapes than the conventional color-color diagrams, and it is naturally arranged to properly represent the statistical similarity of various spectral shapes. We demonstrate the new technique in the 0.3-8 keV energy range using Chandra ACIS-S detector response function and a typical aperture photometry involving background subtraction. The technique can be applied in any energy band, provided the energy distribution of photons can be obtained.
  • The low resolution X-ray spectra around $\eta$ Car covering Tr 16 and part of Tr 14 have been extracted from a Chandra CCD ACIS image. Various analysis techniques have been applied to the spectra based on their count rates. The spectra with the greatest number of counts (HD 93162 = WR 25, HD 93129AB, and HD 93250) have been fit with a wind model, which uses several components with different temperatures and depths in the wind. Weaker spectra have been fit with Raymond-Smith models. The weakest spectra are simply inter-compared with strong spectra. In general, fits produce reasonable parameters based on knowledge of the extinction from optical studies and on the range of temperatures for high and low mass stars. Direct comparisons of spectra confirm the consistency of the fitting results and also hardness ratios for cases of unusually large extinction in the clusters. The spectra of the low mass stars are harder than the more massive stars. Stars in the sequence evolving from the main sequence (HD 93250) through the system containing the O supergiant (HD 93129AB) and then through the Wolf-Rayet stage (HD93162), presumably ending in the extreme example of $\eta$ Car, share the property of being unusually luminous and hard in X-rays. For these X-ray luminous stars, their high mass and evolutionary status (from the very last stages of the main sequence and beyond) is the common feature. Their binary status is mixed, and magnetic status is still uncertain.
  • We describe an observation of the X-ray luminous SN1978K in NGC 1313 using the ACIS detector on Chandra and an archival Newton EPIC observation. The models that provided good fits to the ASCA SIS and GIS and the ROSAT PSPC spectra no longer do so for the ACIS or EPIC spectra. The best-fit model to the ACIS and EPIC spectra are dual hot plasma model (vmekal); one component is soft (T = 0.61+0.04-0.05 keV, 90% errors) and the other is harder (T=3.16+0.44-0.40 keV). For the varying abundances permitted within the model, only the Si abundance of the soft component differs from solar, with a value n(Si)(SN78K)/n(Si)(solar) = 3.20+1.80-1.90 (90% errors). From a ratio of the low- and high-T model fits to the Chandra and XMM-Newton spectra, we infer an exponent n of the ejecta density distribution, rho_ejecta ~ r^(-n), of ~5.2, adopting a circumstellar matter distribution exponent of s = 2 (rho_cs ~ r^(-s)). The 0.5-2 keV light curve shows essentially no decline; the 2-10 keV light curve, constructed only of the ASCA, XMM-Newton, and Chandra observations, shows a drop of 1.5 from the ASCA epoch. The hard band decline, together with the apparently enhanced Si emission, signal the start of the X-ray decline of SN1978K.
  • We present a preliminary look at the serendipitous observation of the intermediate polar TX Col by Chandra. The 52 ksec observation is uninterrupted, providing an opportunity to disentangle the light curve and power spectra components. We illustrate the energy-dependence of the power spectrum.
  • The region around the $\eta$ Car nebula has three OB associations, which contain a Wolf-Rayet star and several massive O3 stars. An early Chandra ACIS-I image was centered on $\eta$ Car and includes Trumpler 16 and part of Trumpler 14. The Chandra image confirms the well-known result that O and very early B stars are X-ray sources with L$_X$ $\simeq$ 10$^{-7} \times$ L$_{bol}$ over an X-ray luminosity range of about 100. Two new anomalously strong X-ray sources have been found among the hot star population, Tr 16-244, a heavily-reddened O3 I star, and Tr 16-22, a heavily-reddened O8.5 V star. Two stars have an unusually large L$_X$/L$_{bol}$: HD 93162, a Wolf-Rayet star (and possible binary), and Tr 16-22, a possible colliding wind binary In addition, a population of sources associated with cool stars is detected. In the color-magnitude diagram, these X-ray sources sit above the sequence of field stars in the Carina arm. The OB stars are on average more X-ray luminous than the cool star X-ray sources. X-ray sources among A stars have similar X-ray luminosities to cooler stars, and may be due to cooler companions. Upper limits are presented for B stars which are not detected in X-rays. These upper limits are also the upper limits for any cool companions which the hot stars may have. Hardness ratios are presented for the most luminous sources in bands 0.5 to 0.9 keV, 0.9 to 1.5 keV, and 1.5 to 2.04 kev. The available information on the binary nature of the hot stars is discussed, but binarity does not correlate with X-ray strength in a simple way.
  • A paper by Qian & Wasserburg suggests the optical absorption lines of uranium observed in the spectra of ultra-metal-poor stars (defined as [Fe/H] $<$-3) arise from contamination from a supernova in a binary star system. Assuming the binary survived the explosion, a collapsed compact object may be present and implying potential accretion processes with accompanying X-ray emission. Upper limits on X-ray emission from an accreting compact object are described here.
  • We describe a series of observations of NGC 1313 using the ROSAT HRI with a combined exposure time of 183.5 ksec. The observations span an interval between 1992 and 1998; the purpose of observations since 1994 was to monitor the X-ray flux of SN1978K, one of several luminous sources in the galaxy. No diffuse emission is detected in the galaxy to a level of ~1-2x10^37 ergs/s/arcmin^-2. A total of eight sources are detected in the summed image within the D_25 diameter of the galaxy. The luminosities of five of the eight range from \~6x10^37 to ~6x10^38 erg/s; these sources are most likely accreting X-ray binaries, similar to sources obseved in M31 and M33. The remaining three sources all emit above 10^39 erg/s. We present light curves of the five brightest sources. Variability is detected at the 99.9% level from four of these. We identify one of the sources as an NGC 1313 counterpart of a Galactic X-ray source. The light curve, though crudely sampled, most closely resembles that of a Galactic black hole candidate such as GX339-4, but with considerably higher peak X-ray luminosity. An additional seven sources lie outside of the D_25 diameter and are either foreground stars or background AGN.
  • We present observations of the young, Oxygen-rich supernova remnant 1E0102.2-7219 taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory during Chandra's Orbital Activation and Checkout phase. The boundary of the blast wave shock is clearly seen for the first time, allowing the diameter of the remnant and the mean blast wave velocity to be determined accurately. The prominent X-ray bright ring of material may be the result of the reverse shock encountering ejecta; the radial variation of O VII vs. O VIII emission indicates an ionizing shock propagating inwards, possibly through a strong density gradient in the ejecta. We compare the X-ray emission to Australia Telescope Compact Array 6 cm radio observations (Amy and Ball) and to archival Hubble Space Telescope [O III] observations. The ring of radio emission is predominantly inward of the outer blast wave, consistent with an interpretation as synchrotron radiation originating behind the blast wave, but outward of the bright X-ray ring of emission. Many (but not all) of the prominent optical filaments are seen to correspond to X-ray bright regions. We obtain an upper limit of ~9e33 erg/s (3 sigma) on any potential pulsar X-ray emission from the central region.
  • Optical spectra of SN1994W in NGC 4041 revealed the presence of a dense (N_e > 10^8 cm^-3) circumstellar shell. An observation with the ROSAT HRI detected a source, with a 0.2-2.4 keV luminosity of ~8x10^39 erg/sec, coincident with the position of SN1994W to within 1''.4. The positional coincidence plus the optical evidence for a dense circumstellar shell support the identification of the X-ray source as SN1994W.
  • We update the light curves from the X-ray, optical, and radio bandpasses which we have assembled over the past decade, and present two observations in the ultraviolet using the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph. The HRI X-ray light curve is constant within the errors over the entire observation period. This behavior is confirmed in the ASCA GIS data obtained in 1993 and 1995. In the ultraviolet, we detected Ly-alpha, the [Ne IV] 2422/2424 A doublet, the Mg II doublet at 2800 A, and a line at ~3190 A we attribute to He I 3187. Only the Mg II and He I lines are detected at SN1978K's position. The optical light curve is formally constant within the errors, although a slight upward trend may be present. The radio light curve continues its steep decline. The longer time span of our radio observations compared to previous studies shows that SN1978K is in the same class of highly X-ray and radio-luminous supernovae as SN1986J and SN1988Z. The [Ne IV] emission is spatially distant from the location of SN1978K and originates in the pre-shocked matter. The Mg II doublet flux ratio implies the quantity of line optical depth times density of ~10^14 cm^-3 for its emission region. The emission site must lie in the shocked gas.