• We algorithmize the recent structural characterization for claw-free graphs by Chudnovsky and Seymour. Building on this result, we show that Dominating Set on claw-free graphs is (i) fixed-parameter tractable and (ii) even possesses a polynomial kernel. To complement these results, we establish that Dominating Set is not fixed-parameter tractable on the slightly larger class of graphs that exclude K_{1,4} as an induced subgraph (K_{1,4}-free graphs). We show that our algorithmization can also be used to show that the related Connected Dominating Set problem is fixed-parameter tractable on claw-free graphs. To complement that result, we show that Connected Dominating Set has no polynomial kernel on claw-free graphs and is not fixed-parameter tractable on K_{1,4}-free graphs. Combined, our results provide a dichotomy for Dominating Set and Connected Dominating Set on K_{1,L}-free graphs and show that the problem is fixed-parameter tractable if and only if L <= 3.
  • In algorithmic graph theory, a classic open question is to determine the complexity of the Maximum Independent Set problem on $P_t$-free graphs, that is, on graphs not containing any induced path on $t$ vertices. So far, polynomial-time algorithms are known only for $t\le 5$ [Lokshtanov et al., SODA 2014, 570--581, 2014], and an algorithm for $t=6$ announced recently [Grzesik et al. Arxiv 1707.05491, 2017]. Here we study the existence of subexponential-time algorithms for the problem: we show that for any $t\ge 1$, there is an algorithm for Maximum Independent Set on $P_t$-free graphs whose running time is subexponential in the number of vertices. Even for the weighted version MWIS, the problem is solvable in $2^{O(\sqrt {tn \log n})}$ time on $P_t$-free graphs. For approximation of MIS in broom-free graphs, a similar time bound is proved. Scattered Set is the generalization of Maximum Independent Set where the vertices of the solution are required to be at distance at least $d$ from each other. We give a complete characterization of those graphs $H$ for which $d$-Scattered Set on $H$-free graphs can be solved in time subexponential in the size of the input (that is, in the number of vertices plus the number of edges): If every component of $H$ is a path, then $d$-Scattered Set on $H$-free graphs with $n$ vertices and $m$ edges can be solved in time $2^{O(|V(H)|\sqrt{n+m}\log (n+m))}$, even if $d$ is part of the input. Otherwise, assuming the Exponential-Time Hypothesis (ETH), there is no $2^{o(n+m)}$-time algorithm for $d$-Scattered Set for any fixed $d\ge 3$ on $H$-free graphs with $n$-vertices and $m$-edges.
  • A disconnected cut of a connected graph is a vertex cut that itself also induces a disconnected subgraph. The decision problem whether a graph has a disconnected cut is called Disconnected Cut. This problem is closely related to several homomorphism and contraction problems, and fits in an extensive line of research on vertex cuts with additional properties. It is known that Disconnected Cut is NP-hard on general graphs, while polynomial-time algorithms are known for several graph classes. However, the complexity of the problem on claw-free graphs remained an open question. Its connection to the complexity of the problem to contract a claw-free graph to the 4-vertex cycle $C_4$ led Ito et al. (TCS 2011) to explicitly ask to resolve this open question. We prove that Disconnected Cut is polynomial-time solvable on claw-free graphs, answering the question of Ito et al. The centerpiece of our result is a novel decomposition theorem for claw-free graphs of diameter 2, which we believe is of independent interest and expands the research line initiated by Chudnovsky and Seymour (JCTB 2007-2012) and Hermelin et al. (ICALP 2011). On our way to exploit this decomposition theorem, we characterize how disconnected cuts interact with certain cobipartite subgraphs, and prove two further novel algorithmic results, namely Disconnected Cut is polynomial-time solvable on circular-arc graphs and line graphs.
  • A well-studied coloring problem is to assign colors to the edges of a graph $G$ so that, for every pair of vertices, all edges of at least one shortest path between them receive different colors. The minimum number of colors necessary in such a coloring is the strong rainbow connection number ($\src(G)$) of the graph. When proving upper bounds on $\src(G)$, it is natural to prove that a coloring exists where, for \emph{every} shortest path between every pair of vertices in the graph, all edges of the path receive different colors. Therefore, we introduce and formally define this more restricted edge coloring number, which we call \emph{very strong rainbow connection number} ($\vsrc(G)$). In this paper, we give upper bounds on $\vsrc(G)$ for several graph classes, some of which are tight. These immediately imply new upper bounds on $\src(G)$ for these classes, showing that the study of $\vsrc(G)$ enables meaningful progress on bounding $\src(G)$. Then we study the complexity of the problem to compute $\vsrc(G)$, particularly for graphs of bounded treewidth, and show this is an interesting problem in its own right. We prove that $\vsrc(G)$ can be computed in polynomial time on cactus graphs; in contrast, this question is still open for $\src(G)$. We also observe that deciding whether $\vsrc(G) = k$ is fixed-parameter tractable in $k$ and the treewidth of $G$. Finally, on general graphs, we prove that there is no polynomial-time algorithm to decide whether $\vsrc(G) \leq 3$ nor to approximate $\vsrc(G)$ within a factor $n^{1-\varepsilon}$, unless P$=$NP.
  • A graph $G$ is a $(\Pi_A,\Pi_B)$-graph if $V(G)$ can be bipartitioned into $A$ and $B$ such that $G[A]$ satisfies property $\Pi_A$ and $G[B]$ satisfies property $\Pi_B$. The $(\Pi_{A},\Pi_{B})$-Recognition problem is to recognize whether a given graph is a $(\Pi_A,\Pi_B)$-graph. There are many $(\Pi_{A},\Pi_{B})$-Recognition problems, including the recognition problems for bipartite, split, and unipolar graphs. We present efficient algorithms for many cases of $(\Pi_A,\Pi_B)$-Recognition based on a technique which we dub inductive recognition. In particular, we give fixed-parameter algorithms for two NP-hard $(\Pi_{A},\Pi_{B})$-Recognition problems, Monopolar Recognition and 2-Subcoloring. We complement our algorithmic results with several hardness results for $(\Pi_{A},\Pi_{B})$-Recognition.
  • We propose polynomial-time algorithms that sparsify planar and bounded-genus graphs while preserving optimal or near-optimal solutions to Steiner problems. Our main contribution is a polynomial-time algorithm that, given an unweighted graph $G$ embedded on a surface of genus $g$ and a designated face $f$ bounded by a simple cycle of length $k$, uncovers a set $F \subseteq E(G)$ of size polynomial in $g$ and $k$ that contains an optimal Steiner tree for any set of terminals that is a subset of the vertices of $f$. We apply this general theorem to prove that: * given an unweighted graph $G$ embedded on a surface of genus $g$ and a terminal set $S \subseteq V(G)$, one can in polynomial time find a set $F \subseteq E(G)$ that contains an optimal Steiner tree $T$ for $S$ and that has size polynomial in $g$ and $|E(T)|$; * an analogous result holds for an optimal Steiner forest for a set $S$ of terminal pairs; * given an unweighted planar graph $G$ and a terminal set $S \subseteq V(G)$, one can in polynomial time find a set $F \subseteq E(G)$ that contains an optimal (edge) multiway cut $C$ separating $S$ and that has size polynomial in $|C|$. In the language of parameterized complexity, these results imply the first polynomial kernels for Steiner Tree and Steiner Forest on planar and bounded-genus graphs (parameterized by the size of the tree and forest, respectively) and for (Edge) Multiway Cut on planar graphs (parameterized by the size of the cutset). Additionally, we obtain a weighted variant of our main contribution.
  • Consider the Maximum Weight Independent Set problem for rectangles: given a family of weighted axis-parallel rectangles in the plane, find a maximum-weight subset of non-overlapping rectangles. The problem is notoriously hard both in the approximation and in the parameterized setting. The best known polynomial-time approximation algorithms achieve super-constant approximation ratios [Chalermsook and Chuzhoy, SODA 2009; Chan and Har-Peled, Discrete & Comp. Geometry 2012], even though there is a $(1+\epsilon)$-approximation running in quasi-polynomial time [Adamaszek and Wiese, FOCS 2013; Chuzhoy and Ene, FOCS 2016]. When parameterized by the target size of the solution, the problem is $\mathsf{W}[1]$-hard even in the unweighted setting [Marx, FOCS 2007]. To achieve tractability, we study the following shrinking model: one is allowed to shrink each input rectangle by a multiplicative factor $1-\delta$ for some fixed $\delta>0$, but the performance is still compared against the optimal solution for the original, non-shrunk instance. We prove that in this regime, the problem admits an EPTAS with running time $f(\epsilon,\delta)\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$, and an FPT algorithm with running time $f(k,\delta)\cdot n^{\mathcal{O}(1)}$, in the setting where a maximum-weight solution of size at most $k$ is to be computed. This improves and significantly simplifies a PTAS given earlier for this problem [Adamaszek et al., APPROX 2015], and provides the first parameterized results for the shrinking model. Furthermore, we explore kernelization in the shrinking model, by giving efficient kernelization procedures for several variants of the problem when the input rectangles are squares.
  • The metric dimension of a graph $G$ is the size of a smallest subset $L \subseteq V(G)$ such that for any $x,y \in V(G)$ with $x\not= y$ there is a $z \in L$ such that the graph distance between $x$ and $z$ differs from the graph distance between $y$ and $z$. Even though this notion has been part of the literature for almost 40 years, prior to our work the computational complexity of determining the metric dimension of a graph was still very unclear. In this paper, we show tight complexity boundaries for the Metric Dimension problem. We achieve this by giving two complementary results. First, we show that the Metric Dimension problem on planar graphs of maximum degree $6$ is NP-complete. Then, we give a polynomial-time algorithm for determining the metric dimension of outerplanar graphs.
  • Let $d \geq 1$ be an integer. From a set of $d$-dimensional vectors, we obtain a $d$-dot product graph by letting each vector ${\bf a}^u$ correspond to a vertex $u$ and by adding an edge between two vertices $u$ and $v$ if and only if their dot product ${\bf a}^{u} \cdot {\bf a}^{v} \geq t$, for some fixed, positive threshold~$t$. Dot product graphs can be used to model social networks. Recognizing a $d$-dot product graph is known to be \NP-hard for all fixed $d\geq 2$. To understand the position of $d$-dot product graphs in the landscape of graph classes, we consider the case $d=2$, and investigate how $2$-dot product graphs relate to a number of other known graph classes.
  • In the Independent set problem, the input is a graph $G$, every vertex has a non-negative integer weight, and the task is to find a set $S$ of pairwise non-adjacent vertices, maximizing the total weight of the vertices in $S$. We give an $n^{O (\log^2 n)}$ time algorithm for this problem on graphs excluding the path $P_6$ on $6$ vertices as an induced subgraph. Currently, there is no constant $k$ known for which Independent Set on $P_{k}$-free graphs becomes NP-complete, and our result implies that if such a $k$ exists, then $k > 6$ unless all problems in NP can be decided in (quasi)polynomial time. Using the combinatorial tools that we develop for the above algorithm, we also give a polynomial-time algorithm for Efficient Dominating Set on $P_6$-free graphs. In this problem, the input is a graph $G$, every vertex has an integer weight, and the objective is to find a set $S$ of maximum weight such that every vertex in $G$ has exactly one vertex in $S$ in its closed neighborhood, or to determine that no such set exists. Prior to our work, the class of $P_6$-free graphs was the only class of graphs defined by a single forbidden induced subgraph on which the computational complexity of Efficient Dominating Set was unknown.
  • The Steiner Multicut problem asks, given an undirected graph G, terminals sets T1,...,Tt $\subseteq$ V(G) of size at most p, and an integer k, whether there is a set S of at most k edges or nodes s.t. of each set Ti at least one pair of terminals is in different connected components of G \ S. This problem generalizes several graph cut problems, in particular the Multicut problem (the case p = 2), which is fixed-parameter tractable for the parameter k [Marx and Razgon, Bousquet et al., STOC 2011]. We provide a dichotomy of the parameterized complexity of Steiner Multicut. That is, for any combination of k, t, p, and the treewidth tw(G) as constant, parameter, or unbounded, and for all versions of the problem (edge deletion and node deletion with and without deletable terminals), we prove either that the problem is fixed-parameter tractable or that the problem is hard (W[1]-hard or even (para-)NP-complete). We highlight that: - The edge deletion version of Steiner Multicut is fixed-parameter tractable for the parameter k+t on general graphs (but has no polynomial kernel, even on trees). We present two proofs: one using the randomized contractions technique of Chitnis et al, and one relying on new structural lemmas that decompose the Steiner cut into important separators and minimal s-t cuts. - In contrast, both node deletion versions of Steiner Multicut are W[1]-hard for the parameter k+t on general graphs. - All versions of Steiner Multicut are W[1]-hard for the parameter k, even when p=3 and the graph is a tree plus one node. Hence, the results of Marx and Razgon, and Bousquet et al. do not generalize to Steiner Multicut. Since we allow k, t, p, and tw(G) to be any constants, our characterization includes a dichotomy for Steiner Multicut on trees (for tw(G) = 1), and a polynomial time versus NP-hardness dichotomy (by restricting k,t,p,tw(G) to constant or unbounded).
  • A graph is called (claw,diamond)-free if it contains neither a claw (a $K_{1,3}$) nor a diamond (a $K_4$ with an edge removed) as an induced subgraph. Equivalently, (claw,diamond)-free graphs can be characterized as line graphs of triangle-free graphs, or as linear dominoes, i.e., graphs in which every vertex is in at most two maximal cliques and every edge is in exactly one maximal clique. In this paper we consider the parameterized complexity of the (claw,diamond)-free Edge Deletion problem, where given a graph $G$ and a parameter $k$, the question is whether one can remove at most $k$ edges from $G$ to obtain a (claw,diamond)-free graph. Our main result is that this problem admits a polynomial kernel. We complement this finding by proving that, even on instances with maximum degree $6$, the problem is NP-complete and cannot be solved in time $2^{o(k)}\cdot |V(G)|^{O(1)}$ unless the Exponential Time Hypothesis fail
  • Paths P1,...,Pk in a graph G=(V,E) are said to be mutually induced if for any 1 <= i < j <= k, Pi and Pj have neither common vertices nor adjacent vertices (except perhaps their end-vertices). The Induced Disjoint Paths problem is to test whether a graph G with k pairs of specified vertices (si,ti) contains k mutually induced paths Pi such that Pi connects si and ti for i=1,...,k. We show that this problem is fixed-parameter tractable for claw-free graphs when parameterized by k. Several related problems, such as the k-in-a-Path problem, are proven to be fixed-parameter tractable for claw-free graphs as well. We show that an improvement of these results in certain directions is unlikely, for example by noting that the Induced Disjoint Paths problem cannot have a polynomial kernel for line graphs (a type of claw-free graphs), unless NP \subseteq coNP/poly. Moreover, the problem becomes NP-complete, even when k=2, for the more general class of K_1,4-free graphs. Finally, we show that the n^O(k)-time algorithm of Fiala et al. for testing whether a claw-free graph contains some k-vertex graph H as a topological induced minor is essentially optimal by proving that this problem is W[1]-hard even if G and H are line graphs.
  • The Induced Disjoint Paths problem is to test whether a graph G with k distinct pairs of vertices (s_i,t_i) contains paths P_1,...,P_k such that P_i connects s_i and t_i for i=1,...,k, and P_i and P_j have neither common vertices nor adjacent vertices (except perhaps their ends) for 1<=i < j<=k. We present a linear-time algorithm for Induced Disjoint Paths on circular-arc graphs. For interval graphs, we exhibit a linear-time algorithm for the generalization of Induced Disjoint Paths where the pairs (s_i,t_i) are not necessarily distinct.
  • The Induced Graph Matching problem asks to find k disjoint induced subgraphs isomorphic to a given graph H in a given graph G such that there are no edges between vertices of different subgraphs. This problem generalizes the classical Independent Set and Induced Matching problems, among several other problems. We show that Induced Graph Matching is fixed-parameter tractable in k on claw-free graphs when H is a fixed connected graph, and even admits a polynomial kernel when H is a complete graph. Both results rely on a new, strong, and generic algorithmic structure theorem for claw-free graphs. Complementing the above positive results, we prove W[1]-hardness of Induced Graph Matching on graphs excluding K_1,4 as an induced subgraph, for any fixed complete graph H. In particular, we show that Independent Set is W[1]-hard on K_1,4-free graphs. Finally, we consider the complexity of Induced Graph Matching on a large subclass of claw-free graphs, namely on proper circular-arc graphs. We show that the problem is either polynomial-time solvable or NP-complete, depending on the connectivity of H and the structure of G.
  • Many combinatorial problems involving weights can be formulated as a so-called ranged problem. That is, their input consists of a universe $U$, a (succinctly-represented) set family $\mathcal{F} \subseteq 2^{U}$, a weight function $\omega:U \rightarrow \{1,...,N\}$, and integers $0 \leq l \leq u \leq \infty$. Then the problem is to decide whether there is an $X \in \mathcal{F}$ such that $l \leq \sum_{e \in X}\omega(e) \leq u$. Well-known examples of such problems include Knapsack, Subset Sum, Maximum Matching, and Traveling Salesman. In this paper, we develop a generic method to transform a ranged problem into an exact problem (i.e. a ranged problem for which $l=u$). We show that our method has several intriguing applications in exact exponential algorithms and parameterized complexity, namely: - In exact exponential algorithms, we present new insight into whether Subset Sum and Knapsack have efficient algorithms in both time and space. In particular, we show that the time and space complexity of Subset Sum and Knapsack are equivalent up to a small polynomial factor in the input size. We also give an algorithm that solves sparse instances of Knapsack efficiently in terms of space and time. - In parameterized complexity, we present the first kernelization results on weighted variants of several well-known problems. In particular, we show that weighted variants of Vertex Cover, Dominating Set, Traveling Salesman and Knapsack all admit polynomial randomized Turing kernels when parameterized by $|U|$. Curiously, our method relies on a technique more commonly found in approximation algorithms.
  • We initiate the study of a new parameterization of graph problems. In a multiple interval representation of a graph, each vertex is associated to at least one interval of the real line, with an edge between two vertices if and only if an interval associated to one vertex has a nonempty intersection with an interval associated to the other vertex. A graph on n vertices is a k-gap interval graph if it has a multiple interval representation with at most n+k intervals in total. In order to scale up the nice algorithmic properties of interval graphs (where k=0), we parameterize graph problems by k, and find FPT algorithms for several problems, including Feedback Vertex Set, Dominating Set, Independent Set, Clique, Clique Cover, and Multiple Interval Transversal. The Coloring problem turns out to be W[1]-hard and we design an XP algorithm for the recognition problem.
  • The Firefighter problem is to place firefighters on the vertices of a graph to prevent a fire with known starting point from lighting up the entire graph. In each time step, a firefighter may be permanently placed on an unburned vertex and the fire spreads to its neighborhood in the graph in so far no firefighters are protecting those vertices. The goal is to let as few vertices burn as possible. This problem is known to be NP-complete, even when restricted to bipartite graphs or to trees of maximum degree three. Initial study showed the Firefighter problem to be fixed-parameter tractable on trees in various parameterizations. We complete these results by showing that the problem is in FPT on general graphs when parameterized by the number of burned vertices, but has no polynomial kernel on trees, resolving an open problem. Conversely, we show that the problem is W[1]-hard when parameterized by the number of unburned vertices, even on bipartite graphs. For both parameterizations, we additionally give refined algorithms on trees, improving on the running times of the known algorithms.