• The number of electrons on isolated small metallic islands and semiconductor quantum dots is quantized. When tunnelling is enabled via opaque barriers this number can change by an integer.Every extra electron adds an elementary charge, e, at an energy cost, a charging energy, which at low temperatures regulates the electron flow as one-by-one, single electron tunnelling.In superconductors the addition is in units of 2e charges, reflecting that the Cooper pair condensate must have an even parity [3]. This even-parity ground state is foundational for all superconducting qubit devices. Here, we study a hybrid superconducting (aluminium)-semiconducting (InSb) island and find that a magnetic field can induce an even- to odd- parity transition in the superconducting ground state. This parity transition can occur when a single, spin-resolved subgap state (i.e. an Andreev bound state, ABS) has crossed zero energy.In addition, we also find that the magnetic field can cause a change from 2e to 1e charge quantization while the aluminium remains superconducting. This observation is compatible with ABS at zero energy or the presence of Majorana zero modes (MZMs).
  • Junctions created by coupling two superconductors via a semiconductor nanowire in the presence of high magnetic fields are the basis for detection, fusion, and braiding of Majorana bound states. We study NbTiN/InSb nanowire/NbTiN Josephson junctions and find that their critical currents in the few mode regime are strongly suppressed by magnetic field. Furthermore, the dependence of the critical current on magnetic field exhibits gate-tunable nodes. Based on a realistic numerical model we conclude that the Zeeman effect induced by the magnetic field and the spin-orbit interaction in the nanowire are insufficient to explain the observed evolution of the Josephson effect. We find the interference between the few occupied one-dimensional modes in the nanowire to be the dominant mechanism responsible for the critical current behavior. The suppression and non-monotonic evolution of critical currents at finite magnetic field should be taken into account when designing circuits based on Majorana bound states.
  • Majorana Zero Modes (MZMs) are prime candidates for robust topological quantum bits, holding a great promise for quantum computing. Semiconducting nanowires with strong spin orbit coupling offers a promising platform to harness one-dimensional electron transport for Majorana physics. Demonstrating the topological nature of MZMs relies on braiding, accomplished by moving MZMs around each other in a certain sequence. Most of the proposed Majorana braiding circuits require nanowire networks with minimal disorder. Here, the electronic transport across a junction between two merged InSb nanowires is studied to investigate how disordered these nanowire networks are. Conductance quantization plateaus are observed in all contact pairs of the epitaxial InSb nanowire networks; the hallmark of ballistic transport behavior.
  • We measured the Josephson radiation emitted by an InSb semiconductor nanowire junction utilizing photon assisted quasiparticle tunneling in an AC-coupled superconducting tunnel junction. We quantify the action of the local microwave environment by evaluating the frequency dependence of the inelastic Cooper-pair tunneling of the nanowire junction and find the zero frequency impedance $Z(0)=492\,\Omega$ with a cutoff frequency of $f_0=33.1\,$GHz. We extract a circuit coupling efficiency of $\eta\approx 0.1$ and a detector quantum efficiency approaching unity in the high frequency limit. In addition to the Josephson radiation, we identify a shot noise contribution with a Fano factor of $F=0.88$ which is consistent with the presence of single electron states in the nanowire channel.
  • Majorana zero modes (MZMs), prime candidates for topological quantum bits, are detected as zero bias conductance peaks (ZBPs) in tunneling spectroscopy measurements. Implementation of a narrow and high tunnel barrier in the next generation of Majorana devices can help to achieve the theoretically predicted quantized height of the ZBP. We propose a material-oriented approach to engineer a sharp and narrow tunnel barrier by synthesizing a thin axial segment of GaxIn1-xSb within an InSb nanowire. By varying the precursor molar fraction and the growth time, we accurately control the composition and the length of the barriers. The height and the width of the GaxIn1-xSb tunnel barrier are extracted from the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB)-fits to the experimental I-V traces.
  • We present angle-dependent measurements of the effective g-factor g* in a Ge-Si core-shell nanowire quantum dot. g* is found to be maximum when the magnetic field is pointing perpendicular to both the nanowire and the electric field induced by local gates. Alignment of the magnetic field with the electric field reduces g* significantly. g* is almost completely quenched when the magnetic field is aligned with the nanowire axis. These findings confirm recent calculations, where the obtained anisotropy is attributed to a Rashba-type spin-orbit interaction induced by heavy-hole light-hole mixing. In principle, this facilitates manipulation of spin-orbit qubits by means of a continuous high-frequency electric field.
  • Ballistic electron transport is a key requirement for existence of a topological phase transition in proximitized InSb nanowires. However, measurements of quantized conductance as direct evidence of ballistic transport have so far been obscured due to the increased chance of backscattering in one dimensional nanowires. We show that by improving the nanowire-metal interface as well as the dielectric environment we can consistently achieve conductance quantization at zero magnetic field. Additionally, studying the sub-band evolution in a rotating magnetic field reveals an orbital degeneracy between the second and third sub-bands for perpendicular fields above 1T.
  • We study the low-temperature electron mobility of InSb nanowires. We extract the mobility at 4.2 Kelvin by means of field effect transport measurements using a model consisting of a nanowire-transistor with contact resistances. This model enables an accurate extraction of device parameters, thereby allowing for a systematic study of the nanowire mobility. We identify factors affecting the mobility, and after optimization obtain a field effect mobility of $\sim2.5\mathbin{\times}10^4$ cm$^2$/Vs. We further demonstrate the reproducibility of these mobility values which are among the highest reported for nanowires. Our investigations indicate that the mobility is currently limited by adsorption of molecules to the nanowire surface and/or the substrate.
  • Interfacing single photons and electrons is a crucial ingredient for sharing quantum information between remote solid-state qubits. Semiconductor nanowires offer the unique possibility to combine optical quantum dots with avalanche photodiodes, thus enabling the conversion of an incoming single photon into a macroscopic current for efficient electrical detection. Currently, millions of excitation events are required to perform electrical read-out of an exciton qubit state. Here we demonstrate multiplication of carriers from only a single exciton generated in a quantum dot after tunneling into a nanowire avalanche photodiode. Due to the large amplification of both electrons and holes (> 10^4), we reduce by four orders of magnitude the number of excitation events required to electrically detect a single exciton generated in a quantum dot. This work represents a significant step towards single-shot electrical read-out and offers a new functionality for on-chip quantum information circuits.
  • The ability to achieve near-unity light extraction efficiency is necessary for a truly deterministic single photon source. The most promising method to reach such high efficiencies is based on embedding single photon emitters in tapered photonic waveguides defined by top-down etching techniques. However, light extraction efficiencies in current top-down approaches are limited by fabrication imperfections and etching induced defects. The efficiency is further tempered by randomly positioned off-axis quantum emitters. Here, we present perfectly positioned single quantum dots on the axis of a tailored nanowire waveguide using bottom-up growth. In comparison to quantum dots in nanowires without waveguide, we demonstrate a 24-fold enhancement in the single photon flux, corresponding to a light extraction efficiency of 42 %. Such high efficiencies in one-dimensional nanowires are promising to transfer quantum information over large distances between remote stationary qubits using flying qubits within the same nanowire p-n junction.
  • We demonstrate ultrafast dephasing in the random transport of light through a layer consisting of strongly scattering GaP nanowires. Dephasing results in a nonlinear intensity modulation of individual pseudomodes which is 100 times larger than that of bulk GaP. Different contributions to the nonlinear response are separated using total transmission, white-light frequency correlation, and statistical pseudomode analysis. A dephasing time of $1.2\pm 0.2$~ps is found. Quantitative agreement is obtained with numerical model calculations which include photoinduced absorption and deformation of individual scatterers. Nonlinear dephasing of photonic eigenmodes opens up avenues for ultrafast control of random lasers, nanophotonic switches, and photon localization.
  • We report recent progress toward on-chip single photon emission and detection in the near infrared utilizing semiconductor nanowires. Our single photon emitter is based on a single InAsP quantum dot embedded in a p-n junction defined along the growth axis of an InP nanowire. Under forward bias, light is emitted from the single quantum dot by electrical injection of electrons and holes. The optical quality of the quantum dot emission is shown to improve when surrounding the dot material by a small intrinsic section of InP. Finally, we report large multiplication factors in excess of 1000 from a single Si nanowire avalanche photodiode comprised of p-doped, intrinsic, and n-doped sections. The large multiplication factor obtained from a single Si nanowire opens up the possibility to detect a single photon at the nanoscale.
  • Electrical conductance through InAs nanowires is relevant for electronic applications as well as for fundamental quantum experiments. Here we employ nominally undoped, slightly tapered InAs nanowires to study the diameter dependence of their conductance. Contacting multiple sections of each wire, we can study the diameter dependence within individual wires without the need to compare different nanowire batches. At room temperature we find a diameter-independent conductivity for diameters larger than 40 nm, indicative of three-dimensional diffusive transport. For smaller diameters, the resistance increases considerably, in coincidence with a strong suppression of the mobility. From an analysis of the effective charge carrier density, we find indications for a surface accumulation layer.
  • Semiconductor nanowires provide promising low-dimensional systems for the study of quantum transport phenomena in combination with superconductivity. Here we investigate the competition between the Coulomb blockade effect, Andreev reflection, and quantum interference, in InAs and InP nanowires connected to aluminum-based superconducting electrodes. We compare three limiting cases depending on the tunnel coupling strength and the characteristic Coulomb interaction energy. For weak coupling and large charging energy, negative differential conductance is observed as a direct consequence of the BCS density of states in the leads. For intermediate coupling and charging energy smaller than the superconducting gap, the current-voltage characteristic is dominated by Andreev reflection and Coulomb blockade produces an effect only near zero bias. For almost ideal contact transparencies and negligible charging energy, we observe universal conductance fluctuations whose amplitude is enhanced due to Andreev reflection at the contacts.
  • We report quantum interference effects in InAs semiconductor nanowires strongly coupled to superconducting electrodes. In the normal state, universal conductance fluctuations are investigated as a function of magnetic field, temperature, bias and gate voltage. The results are found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions for weakly disordered one-dimensional conductors. In the superconducting state, the fluctuation amplitude is enhanced by a factor up to ~ 1.6, which is attributed to a doubling of charge transport via Andreev reflection. At a temperature of 4.2 K, well above the Thouless temperature, conductance fluctuations are almost entirely suppressed, and the nanowire conductance exhibits anomalous quantization in steps of e^{2}/h.
  • We report reproducible fabrication of InP-InAsP nanowire light emitting diodes in which electron-hole recombination is restricted to a quantum-dot-sized InAsP section. The nanowire geometry naturally self-aligns the quantum dot with the n-InP and p-InP ends of the wire, making these devices promising candidates for electrically-driven quantum optics experiments. We have investigated the operation of these nano-LEDs with a consistent series of experiments at room temperature and at 10 K, demonstrating the potential of this system for single photon applications.
  • We show how a scanning probe microscope (SPM) can be used to image electron flow through InAs nanowires, elucidating the physics of nanowire devices on a local scale. A charged SPM tip is used as a movable gate. Images of nanowire conductance vs. tip position spatially map the conductance of InAs nanowires at liquid He temperatures. Plots of conductance vs. back gate voltage without the tip present show complex patterns of Coulomb-blockade peaks. Images of nanowire conductance identify multiple quantum dots located along the nanowire - each dot is surrounded by a series of concentric rings corresponding to Coulomb blockade peaks. An image locates the dots and provides information about their size. The rings around individual dots interfere with each other like Coulomb blockade peaks of multiple quantum dots in series. In this way, the SPM tip can probe complex multi-dot systems by tuning the charge state of individual dots. The nanowires were grown from metal catalyst particles and have diameters ~ 80 nm and lengths 2 to 3 um.
  • When two superconductors become electrically connected by a weak link a zero-resistance supercurrent can flow. This supercurrent is carried by Cooper pairs of electrons with a combined charge of twice the elementary charge, e. The 2e charge quantum is clearly visible in the height of Shapiro steps in Josephson junctions under microwave irradiation and in the magnetic flux periodicity of h/2e in superconducting quantum interference devices. Several different materials have been used to weakly couple superconductors, such as tunnel barriers, normal metals, or semiconductors. Here, we study supercurrents through a quantum dot created in a semiconductor nanowire by local electrostatic gating. Due to strong Coulomb interaction, electrons only tunnel one-by-one through the discrete energy levels of the quantum dot. This nevertheless can yield a supercurrent when subsequent tunnel events are coherent. These quantum coherent tunnelling processes can result in either a positive or a negative supercurrent, i.e. in a normal or a pi-junction, respectively. We demonstrate that the supercurrent reverses sign by adding a single electron spin to the quantum dot. When excited states of the quantum dot are involved in transport, the supercurrent sign also depends on the character of the orbital wavefunctions.
  • Nanoscale superconductor-semiconductor hybrid devices are assembled from InAs semiconductor nanowires individually contacted by aluminum-based superconductor electrodes. Below 1 K, the high transparency of the contacts gives rise to proximity-induced superconductivity. The nanowires form superconducting weak links operating as mesoscopic Josephson junctions with electrically tunable coupling. The supercurrent can be switched on/off by a gate voltage acting on the electron density in the nanowire. A variation in gate voltage induces universal fluctuations in the normal-state conductance which are clearly correlated to critical current fluctuations. The ac Josephson effect gives rise to Shapiro steps in the voltage-current characteristic under microwave irradiation.