• Although qubits are the leading candidate for the basic elements in a quantum computer, there are also a range of reasons to consider using higher dimensional qudits or quantum continuous variables (QCVs). In this paper we use a general `quantum variable' formalism to propose a method of quantum computation in which ancillas are used to mediate gates on a well-isolated `quantum memory' register and which may be applied to the setting of qubits, qudits (for $d>2$) or QCVs. More specifically, we present a model in which universal quantum computation may be implemented on a register using only: repeated applications of a single fixed two-body ancilla-register interaction gate, ancillas prepared in a single state, and local measurements of these ancillas. In order to maintain determinism in the computation, adaptive measurements via a classical-feedforward of measurement outcomes are used, with the method similar to that in measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC). We show that our model has the same hybrid quantum-classical processing advantages as MBQC, including the power to implement any Clifford circuit in essentially one layer of quantum computation. In some physical settings, high-quality measurements of the ancillas may be highly challenging or not possible, and hence we also present a globally unitary model which replaces the need for measurements of the ancillas with the requirement for ancillas to be prepared in states from a fixed orthonormal basis. Finally, we discuss settings in which these models may be of practical interest.
  • Digital signatures play an important role in software distribution, modern communication and financial transactions, where it is important to detect forgery and tampering. Signatures are a cryptographic technique for validating the authenticity and integrity of messages, software, or digital documents. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. Quantum digital signatures (QDS), on the other hand, provide information-theoretic security based on the laws of quantum physics. Recent work on QDS shows that such schemes do not require trusted quantum channels and are unconditionally secure against general coherent attacks. However, in practical QDS, just as in quantum key distribution (QKD), the detectors can be subjected to side-channel attacks, which can make the actual implementations insecure. Motivated by the idea of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), we present a measurement-device-independent QDS (MDI-QDS) scheme, which is secure against all detector side-channel attacks. Based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our MDI-QDS protocol could also be experimentally implemented, since it requires a similar experimental setup.
  • Quantum digital signatures (QDS) provide a means for signing electronic communications with informationtheoretic security. However, all previous demonstrations of quantum digital signatures assume trusted measurement devices. This renders them vulnerable against detector side-channel attacks, just like quantum key distribution. Here, we exploit a measurement-device-independent (MDI) quantum network, over a 200-square-kilometer metropolitan area, to perform a field test of a three-party measurement-device-independent quantum digital signature (MDI-QDS) scheme that is secure against any detector side-channel attack. In so doing, we are able to successfully sign a binary message with a security level of about 1E-7. Remarkably, our work demonstrates the feasibility of MDI-QDS for practical applications.
  • Digital signatures are widely used in modern communication to guarantee authenticity and transferability of messages, The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. We present a quantum signature scheme that does not require trusted quantum channels. We prove that it is unconditionally secure against the most general coherent attacks, and show that it requires the transmission of significantly fewer quantum states than previous schemes. We also show that the quantum channel noise threshold for our scheme is less strict than for distilling a secure key using quantum key distribution. This shows that direct quantum signature schemes can be preferable to signature schemes relying on secret shared keys generated using quantum key distribution.
  • We report on the experimental realization of a photonic system that simulates the one-dimensional two-particle Hubbard model. This analogy is realized by means of two-dimensional arrays of coupled optical waveguides, fabricated using femtosecond laser inscription. By tuning the analogous "interaction strength", we reach the strongly-interacting regime of the Hubbard Hamiltonian, and demonstrate the suppression of standard tunneling for individual "particles". In this regime, the formation of bound states is identified through the direct observation of pair tunneling. We then demonstrate the coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) for the paired particles in the presence of an engineered oscillating force of high frequency. The precise control over the analogous "interaction strength" and driving force offered by our experimental system opens an exciting route towards quantum simulation of few-body physics in photonics.
  • Quantum digital signatures apply quantum mechanics to the problem of guaranteeing message integrity and non-repudiation with information-theoretical security, which are complementary to the confidentiality realized by quantum key distribution. Previous experimental demonstrations have been limited to transmission distances of less than 5-km of optical fiber in a laboratory setting. Here we report the first demonstration of quantum digital signatures over installed optical fiber as well as the longest transmission link reported to date. This demonstration used a 90-km long differential phase shift quantum key distribution system to achieve approximately one signed bit per second - an increase in the signature generation rate of several orders of magnitude over previous optical fiber demonstrations.
  • The discovery of the quantised Hall effect, and its subsequent topological explanation, demonstrated the important role topology can play in determining the properties of quantum systems. This realisation led to the development of topological band theory, where, in addition to band index and quasimomentum, Bloch bands are also characterised by a set of topological invariants. This topological theory can be readily extended to periodically-driven systems. In the limit of fast driving, the topology of the system can still be captured by the topological invariants used to describe static systems. In the limit of slow driving, however, situations can arise where standard topological invariants are zero, but yet, topologically protected edge modes are still observed. These "anomalous" topological edge modes have no static analogue, and are associated with a distinct topological invariant, which takes into account the full time-evolution over a driving period. Here we demonstrate the first experimental observation of such anomalous topological edge modes in an ultrafast-laser-inscribed photonic lattice. This inscription technique allows one to address each bond of a lattice independently and dynamically, generating a rich band structure with robust anomalous chiral edge modes and the potential for perfectly localised bulk states.
  • Digital signatures guarantee the authorship of electronic communications. Currently used "classical" signature schemes rely on unproven computational assumptions for security, while quantum signatures rely only on the laws of quantum mechanics. Previous quantum signature schemes have used unambiguous quantum measurements. Such measurements, however, sometimes give no result, reducing the efficiency of the protocol. Here, we instead use heterodyne detection, which always gives a result, although there is always some uncertainty. We experimentally demonstrate feasibility in a real environment by distributing signature states through a noisy 1.6km free-space channel. Our results show that continuous-variable heterodyne detection improves the signature rate for this type of scheme and therefore represents an interesting direction in the search for practical quantum signature schemes.
  • We present an experimental realization of a quantum digital signature protocol which, together with a standard quantum key distribution link, increases transmission distance to kilometre ranges, three orders of magnitude larger than in previous realizations. The bit-rate is also significantly increased compared with previous quantum signature demonstrations. This work illustrates that quantum digital signatures can be realized with optical components similar to those used for quantum key distribution, and could be implemented in existing optical fiber networks.
  • Signature schemes, proposed in 1976 by Diffie and Hellman, have become ubiquitous across modern communications. They allow for the exchange of messages from one sender to multiple recipients, with the guarantees that messages cannot be forged or tampered with and that messages also can be forwarded from one recipient to another without compromising their validity. Signatures are different from, but no less important than encryption, which ensures the privacy of a message. Commonly used signature protocols - signatures based on the Rivest-Adleman-Shamir (RSA) algorithm, the digital signature algorithm (DSA), and the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm (ECDSA) - are only computationally secure, similar to public key encryption methods. In fact, since these rely on the difficulty of finding discrete logarithms or factoring large primes, it is known that they will become completely insecure with the emergence of quantum computers. We may therefore see a shift towards signature protocols that will remain secure even in a post-quantum world. Ideally, such schemes would provide unconditional or information-theoretic security. In this paper, we aim to provide an accessible and comprehensive review of existing unconditionally secure signature schemes for signing classical messages, with a focus on unconditionally secure quantum signature schemes.
  • Digital signatures are widely used in electronic communications to secure important tasks such as financial transactions, software updates, and legal contracts. The signature schemes that are in use today are based on public-key cryptography and derive their security from computational assumptions. However, it is possible to construct unconditionally secure signature protocols. In particular, using quantum communication, it is possible to construct signature schemes with security based on fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. Several quantum signature protocols have been proposed, but none of them has been explicitly generalized to more than three participants, and their security goals have not been formally defined. Here, we first extend the security definitions of Swanson and Stinson (2011) so that they can apply also to the quantum case, and introduce a formal definition of transferability based on different verification levels. We then prove several properties that multiparty signature protocols with information-theoretic security -- quantum or classical -- must satisfy in order to achieve their security goals. We also express two existing quantum signature protocols with three parties in the security framework we have introduced. Finally, we generalize a quantum signature protocol given in Wallden-Dunjko-Kent-Andersson (2015) to the multiparty case, proving its security against forging, repudiation and non-transferability. Notably, this protocol can be implemented using any point-to-point quantum key distribution network and therefore is ready to be experimentally demonstrated.
  • We observe Wannier-Stark localization in curved photonic lattices, realized using arrays of evanescently coupled optical waveguides. By correctly tuning the strength of inter-site coupling in the lattice, we observe that Wannier-Stark states become increasingly localized, and eventually fully localized to one site, as the curvature of the lattice is increased. We then demonstrate that tunneling can be successfully restored in the lattice by applying a sinusoidal modulation to the lattice position, an effect that is a direct analogue of photon-assisted tunneling. This precise tuning of the tunneling matrix elements, through laser-fabricated on-site modulations, opens a novel route for the creation of gauge fields in photonic lattices.
  • We show experimentally how a non-diffracting state can be excited in a photonic Lieb lattice. This lattice supports three energy bands, including a perfectly flat middle band, which corresponds to an infinite effective mass with zero dispersion. We show that a suitable optical input state can be prepared so as to only excite the flat band. We analyse, both experimentally and theoretically, the evolution of such photonic flat-band states, and show their remarkable robustness, even in the presence of disorder.
  • We investigate how to model Markovian evolution of coupled harmonic oscillators, each of them interacting with a local environment. When the coupling between the oscillators is weak, dissipation may be modeled using local Lindblad terms for each of the oscillators in the master equation, as is commonly done. When the coupling between oscillators is strong, this model may become invalid. We derive a master equation for two coupled harmonic oscillators which are subject to individual heat baths modeled by a collection of harmonic oscillators, and show that this master equation in general contains non-local Lindblad terms. We compare the resulting time evolution with that obtained for dissipation through local Lindblad terms for each individual oscillator, and show that the evolution is different in the two cases. In particular, the two descriptions give different predictions for the steady state and for the entanglement between strongly coupled oscillators. This shows that when describing strongly coupled harmonic oscillators, one must take great care in how dissipation is modeled, and that a description using local Lindblad terms may fail. This may be particularly relevant when attempting to generate entangled states of strongly coupled quantum systems.
  • Digital signatures guarantee the authenticity and transferability of messages, and are widely used in modern communication. The security of currently used classical digital signature schemes, however, relies on computational assumptions. In contrast, quantum digital signature (QDS) schemes offer information-theoretic security guaranteed by the laws of quantum mechanics. We present two QDS protocols which have the same experimental requirements as quantum key distribution, which is already commercially available. We also present the first security proof for any QDS scheme against coherent forging attacks.
  • Digital signatures are widely used to provide security for electronic communications, for example in financial transactions and electronic mail. Currently used classical digital signature schemes, however, only offer security relying on unproven computational assumptions. In contrast, quantum digital signatures (QDS) offer information-theoretic security based on laws of quantum mechanics (e.g. Gottesman and Chuang 2001). Here, security against forging relies on the impossibility of perfectly distinguishing between non-orthogonal quantum states. A serious drawback of previous QDS schemes is however that they require long-term quantum memory, making them unfeasible in practice. We present the first realisation of a scheme (Dunjko et al 2013) that does not need quantum memory, and which also uses only standard linear optical components and photodetectors. To achieve this, the recipients measure the distributed quantum signature states using a new type of quantum measurement, quantum state elimination (e.g. Barnett 2009, Bandyopadhyay et al 2013). This significantly advances QDS as a quantum technology with potential for real applications.
  • Master equations govern the time evolution of a quantum system interacting with an environment, and may be written in a variety of forms. Time-independent or memoryless master equations, in particular, can be cast in the well-known Lindblad form. Any time-local master equation, Markovian or non-Markovian, may in fact also be written in a Lindblad-like form. A diagonalisation procedure results in a unique, and in this sense canonical, representation of the equation, which may be used to fully characterize the non-Markovianity of the time evolution. Recently, several different measures of non-Markovianity have been presented which reflect, to varying degrees, the appearance of negative decoherence rates in the Lindblad-like form of the master equation. We therefore propose using the negative decoherence rates themselves, as they appear in the canonical form of the master equation, to completely characterize non-Markovianity. The advantages of this are especially apparent when more than one decoherence channel is present. We show that a measure proposed by Rivas et al. is a surprisingly simple function of the canonical decoherence rates, and give an example of a master equation that is non-Markovian for all times t>0, but to which nearly all proposed measures are blind. We also give necessary and sufficient conditions for trace distance and volume measures to witness non-Markovianity, in terms of the Bloch damping matrix.
  • Knowing about optimal quantum measurements is important for many applications in quantum information and quantum communication. However, deriving optimal quantum measurements is often difficult. We present a collection of results for minimum-cost quantum measurements, and give examples of how they can be used. Among other results, we show that a minimum-cost measurement for a set of given pure states is formally equivalent to a minimum-error measurement for mixed states of those same pure states. For pure symmetric states it turns out that for a certain class of cost matrices, the minimum-cost measurement is the square-root measurement. That is, the optimal minimum-cost measurement is in this case the same as the minimum-error measurement. Finally, we consider sequences of individual ``local" systems, and examine when the global minimum-cost measurement is a sequence of optimal local measurements. We also consider an example where the global minimum-cost measurement is, perhaps counter-intuitively, not a sequence of local measurements, and discuss how this is related to related to the Pusey-Barrett-Rudolph argument for the nature of the wave function.
  • We characterise a model of universal quantum computation where the register (computational) qubits are controlled by ancillary qubits, using only a single fixed interaction between register and ancillary qubits. No additional access is required to the computational register and the dynamics of both the register and ancilla are unitary. This scheme is inspired by the measurement-based ancilla-driven quantum computation of Anders et al. [PRA 82, 020301(R), 2010], but does not require measurements of the ancillas, and in this respect is similar to the original gate based model of quantum computation. We consider what possible forms this ancilla-register interaction can take, with a proof that the interaction is necessarily locally equivalent to SWAP combined with an entangling controlled gate. We further show which Hamiltonians can create such interactions and discuss two examples; the two-qubit XY Hamiltonian and a particular case of the XXZ Hamiltonian. We then give an example of a simple, finite and fault tolerant gate set for universal quantum computation in this model.
  • Quantum Digital Signatures (QDS) allow for the exchange of messages from one sender to multiple recipients, with the guarantee that messages cannot be forged or tampered with. Additionally, messages cannot be repudiated -- if one recipient accepts a message, she is guaranteed that others will accept the same message as well. While messaging with these types of security guarantees are routinely performed in the modern digital world, current technologies only offer security under computational assumptions. QDS, on the other hand, offer security guaranteed by quantum mechanics. All thus far proposed variants of QDS require long-term, high quality storage of quantum information, making them unfeasible in the foreseeable future. Here, we present the first QDS scheme where no quantum memory is required, and all quantum information processing can be performed using just linear optics. This makes QDS feasible with current technology.
  • We theoretically investigate a system of two coupled bosonic modes subject to both dissipation and external driving. We show that in the steady state the degree of entanglement between the coupled bosonic modes can be enhanced by dissipation. The non-monotonic dependence of entanglement on the decay rates is observed when the bosonic modes are asymmetrically coupled to their local baths. This counterintuitive result opens a new way to better understand the interplay between noise and coherence in continuous variable systems driven away from equilibrium.
  • Digital signatures are frequently used in data transfer to prevent impersonation, repudiation and message tampering. Currently used classical digital signature schemes rely on public key encryption techniques, where the complexity of so-called "one-way" mathematical functions is used to provide security over sufficiently long timescales. No mathematical proofs are known for the long-term security of such techniques. Quantum digital signatures offer a means of sending a message which cannot be forged or repudiated, with security verified by information-theoretical limits and quantum mechanics. Here we demonstrate an experimental system which distributes quantum signatures from one sender to two receivers and enables message sending ensured against forging and repudiation. Additionally, we analyse the security of the system in some typical scenarios. The system is based on the interference of phase encoded coherent states of light and our implementation utilises polarisation maintaining optical fibre and photons with a wavelength of 850 nm.
  • Time-local master equations are more generally applicable than is often recognised, but at first sight it would seem that they can only safely be used in time intervals where the time evolution is invertible. Using the Jaynes-Cummings model, we here construct an explicit example where two different Hamiltonians, corresponding to two different non-invertible and non-Markovian time evolutions, will lead to arbitrarily similar time-local master equations. This illustrates how the time-local master equation on its own in this case does not uniquely determine the time evolution. The example is nevertheless artificial in the sense that a rapid change in (at least) one of the Hamiltonians is needed. The change must also occur at a very specific instance in time. If a Hamiltonian is known not to have such very specific behaviour, but is "physically well-behaved", then one may conjecture that a time-local master equation also determines the time evolution when it is not invertible.
  • We investigate probabilistic transformations of quantum states from a `source' set to a `target' set of states. Such transforms have many applications. They can be used for tasks which include state-dependent cloning or quantum state discrimination, and as interfaces between systems whose information encodings are not related by a unitary transform, such as continuous-variable systems and finite-dimensional systems. In a probabilistic transform, information may be lost or leaked, and we explain the concepts of leak and redundancy. Following this, we show how the analysis of probabilistic transforms significantly simplifies for symmetric source and target sets of states. In particular, we give a simple linear program which solves the task of finding optimal transforms, and a method of characterizing the introduced leak and redundancy in information-theoretic terms. Using the developed techniques, we analyse a class of transforms which convert coherent states with information encoded in their relative phase to symmetric qubit states. Each of these sets of states on their own appears in many well studied quantum information protocols. Finally, we suggest an asymptotic realization based on quantum scissors.
  • An important task for quantum information processing is optimal discrimination between two non-orthogonal quantum states, which until now has only been realized optically. Here, we present and compare experimental realizations of optimal quantum measurements for distinguishing between two non-orthogonal quantum states encoded in a single ^14 N nuclear spin. Implemented measurement schemes are the minimum-error measurement (known as Helstrom measurement), unambiguous state discrimination using a standard projective measurement, and optimal unambiguous state discrimination (known as IDP measurement), which utilizes a three-dimensional Hilbert space. Measurement efficiencies are found to be above 80% for all schemes and reach a value of 90% for the IDP measurement