• We have investigated temporal and spectral properties of a large sample of thermonuclear bursts with oscillations from eight different sources with spin frequencies varying from 270 to 620 Hz. For our sample we chose those bursts, for which the oscillation is sufficiently strong and of relatively long duration. The emission from the hot-spot that is formed during a thermonuclear burst is modulated by several physical processes and the burst oscillation profiles unavoidably carry signatures of these. In order to probe these mechanisms, we examined the amplitude and phase lags of the burst oscillations with energy. We also studied the frequency variation of oscillations during these thermonuclear bursts. We observed that the frequency drifts are more frequent in the cases where the spin frequency is lower. We found that the phase lag of the burst oscillations shows no systematic evolution with energy between the bursts, and also in between different sources. In 7 cases, we do indeed observe lag of soft energy photons, while there are a significant number of cases for which hard lag or no lag is observed.
  • Aql X--1 is one of the most prolific low mass X-ray binary transients (LMXBTs) showing outbursts almost annually. We present the results of our spectral analyses of RXTE/PCA observations of the 2000 and the 2011 outbursts. We investigate the spectral changes related to the changing disk-magnetosphere interaction modes of Aql X--1. The X-ray light curves of the outbursts of LMXBTs typically show phases of fast rise and exponential decay. The decay phase shows a "knee" where the flux goes from the slow decay to the rapid decay stage. We assume that the rapid decay corresponds to a weak propeller stage at which a fraction of the inflowing matter in the disk accretes onto the star. We introduce a novel method for inferring, from the light curve, the fraction of the inflowing matter in the disk that accretes onto the NS depending on the fastness parameter. We determine the fastness parameter range within which the transition from the accretion to the partial propeller stage is realized. This fastness parameter range is a measure of the scale-height of the disk in units of the inner disk radius. We applied the method to a sample of outbursts of Aql X--1 with different maximum flux and duration times. We show that different outbursts with different maximum luminosity and duration follow a similar path in the parameter space of accreted/inflowing mass flux fraction versus fastness parameter.
  • We present the X-ray light curves of the last two outbursts --2014 & 2016-- of the well known accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) Aquila X-1 using the monitor of all sky X-ray image (MAXI) observations in the $2-20$ keV band. After calibrating the (MAXI) count rates to the all-sky monitor (ASM) level, we report that the 2016 outburst is the most energetic event of Aql X-1, ever observed from this source. We show that 2016 outburst is a member of the long-high class according to the classification presented by G\"ung\"or et al. with $\sim68$ cnt/s maximum flux and $\sim60$ days duration time and the previous outburst, 2014, belongs to the short-low class with $\sim 25$ cnt/s maximum flux and $\sim 30$ days duration time. In order to understand differences between outbursts, we investigate the possible dependence of the peak intensity to the quiescent duration leading to the outburst and find that the outbursts following longer quiescent episodes tend to reach higher peak energetic.
  • We have compiled the most comprehensive burst sample from magnetar 4U 0142+61, comprising 27 bursts from its three burst-active episodes in 2011, 2012 and the latest one in 2015 observed with Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM. Bursts from 4U 0142+61 morphologically resemble typical short bursts from other magnetars. However, 4U 0142+61 bursts are less energetic compared to the bulk of magnetar bursts. We uncovered an extended tail emission following a burst on 2015 February 28, with a thermal nature, cooling over a time-scale of several minutes. During this tail emission, we also uncovered pulse peak phase aligned X-ray bursts , which could originate from the same underlying mechanism as that of the extended burst tail, or an associated and spatially coincident but different mechanism.
  • Two energetic hard X-ray bursts have recently triggered the Fermi and Swift space observatories from the rotation powered pulsar, PSR J1119-6127. We have performed in depth spectral and temporal analyses of these two events. Our extensive searches in both observatory data for lower luminosity bursts uncovered 10 additional events from the source. We report here on the timing and energetics of the 12 bursts from PSR J1119-6127 during its burst active phase of 2016 July 26 and 28. We also found a spectral softer X-ray flux enhancement in a post burst episode, which shows evidence of cooling. We discuss here the implications of these results on the nature of this unusual high-field radio pulsar, which firmly place it within the typical magnetar population.
  • Extended emission episodes with intensity above the pre-burst level are observed following magnetar bursts from a number of soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). Such extended tail emission were observed subsequent to two events detected from AXP 4U 0142+61. We investigated in detail the evolution of spectral and temporal properties during these two tail segments using RXTE/PCA observations, and report distinct variations both in the spectral and temporal behavior throughout the tails. In particular, sudden enhancement of pulsation amplitude in conjunction with bursts, and smooth decline of X-ray emission (cooling) during the tail were observed in both cases. We suggest that an inefficiently radiating trapped fireball formed during the burst, which can heat up the stellar surface, is able to explain the tail properties and its energetics. We also present the episodic detection of absorption and emission features during tails. One possible mechanism that has been proposed to give rise to such spectral lines is the proton/ion cyclotron resonance process which has been suggested to offer a valuable tool in probing the complex magnetic field of magnetars.
  • We have generated an extended version of rather simplified but physically oriented three-dimensional magnetar emission model, STEMS3D, to allow spectral investigations up to 100 keV. We have then applied it to the broadband spectral spectra of four magnetars: 4U 0142+61, 1E 1841-045, 1E 2259+586 and 1E 1048.1-5937, using data collected with Swift/XRT or XMM-Newton in soft X-rays, and Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array in the hard X-ray band. We found that the hard X-ray emission of 4U 0142+61 was spectrally hard compared to the earlier detections, indicating that the source was likely in a transition to or from a harder state. We find that the surface properties of the four magnetars are consistent with what we have obtained using only the soft X-ray data with STEMS3D, implying that our physically motivated magnetar emission model is a robust tool. Based on our broadband spectral investigations, we conclude that resonant scattering of the surface photons in the magnetosphere alone cannot account for the hard X-ray emission in magnetars; therefore, an additional non-thermal process, or a population of relativistic electrons is required. We also discuss the implication of the non-detection of persistent hard X-ray emission in 1E 1048.1-5937.
  • The 2011 outburst of Swift J1822.3--1606 was extraordinary; periodic modulations at the spin period of the underlying neutron star were clearly visible, remarkably similar to what is observed during the decaying tail of magnetar giant flares. We investigated the temporal characteristics of X-ray emission during the early phases of the outburst. We performed a periodicity search with the spectral hardness ratio (HR), and found a coherent signal near the spin period of the neutron star, but with a lag of about 3 radians. Therefore, the HR is strongly anti-correlated with the X-ray intensity, which is also seen in the giant flares. We studied time evolution of the pulse profile and found that it evolves from a complex morphology to a much simpler shape within about a month. Pulse profile simplification also takes place during the giant flares, but on a much shorter timescale of about few minutes. We found that the amount of energy emitted during the first 25 days of the outburst is comparable to what was detected in minutes during the decaying tail of giant flares. Based on these similarities, we suggest that the triggering mechanisms of the giant flares and the magnetar outbursts are likely the same. We propose that the trapped fireball that develops in the magnetosphere at the onset of the outburst radiates away efficiently in minutes in magnetars exhibiting giant flares, while in other magnetars, such as Swift J1822.3--1606, the efficiency of radiation of the fireball is not as high and, therefore, lasts much longer.
  • We present the results of our extensive search using the Bayesian block method for long tails following short bursts from a magnetar, SGR J1550-5418, over all RXTE observations of the source. We identified four bursts with extended tails, most of which occurred during its 2009 burst active episode. The durations of tails range between ~13 s and over 3 ks, which are much longer than the typical duration of bursts. We performed detailed spectral and temporal analysis of the burst tails. We find that the spectra of three tails show a thermal nature with a trend of cooling throughout the tail. We compare the results of our investigations with the properties of four other extended tails detected from SGR 1900+14 and SGR 1806-20 and suggest a scenario for the origin of the tail in the framework of the magnetar model.
  • Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are recognized as the most promising magnetar candidates, as indicated by their energetic bursts and rapid spin-downs. It is expected that the strong magnetic field leaves distinctive imprints on the emergent radiation both by affecting the radiative processes in atmospheres of magnetars and by scattering in the upper magnetospheres. We construct a self-consistent physical model that incorporates emission from the magnetar surface and its reprocessing in the three-dimensional (3D) twisted magnetosphere using a Monte Carlo technique. The synthetic spectra are characterized by four parameters: surface temperature kT, surface magnetic field strength $B$, magnetospheric twist angle $\Delta\phi$, and the normalized electron velocity $\beta$. We also create a tabular model (STEMS3D) and apply it to a large sample of XMM-Newton spectra of magnetars. The model successfully fits nearly all spectra, and the obtained magnetic field for 7 out of the 11 sources are consistent with the values inferred from the spin-down rates. We conclude that the continuum-fitting by our model is a robust method to measure the magnetic field strength and magnetospheric configuration of AXPs and SGRs. Investigating the multiple observations of variable sources, we also study the mechanism of their spectral evolution. Our results suggest that the magnetospheres in these sources are highly twisted ($\Delta\phi > 1$), and the behavior of magnetospheric twisting and untwisting is revealed in the 2002 outburst of 1E 2259+586.
  • We model the pulse profiles and the phase resolved spectra of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937 obtained with XMM-Newton to map its surface temperature distribution during an active and a quiescent epoch. We develop and apply a model that takes into account the relevant physical and geometrical effects on the neutron star surface, magnetosphere, and spacetime. Using this model, we determine the observables at infinity as a function of pulse phase for different numbers and sizes of hot spots on the surface. We show that the pulse profiles extracted from both observations can be modeled with a single hot spot and an antipodal cool component. The size of the hot spot changes from $\approx 80^{\circ}$ in 2007, 3 months after the onset of a dramatic flux increase, to $\approx 30^{\circ}$ during the quiescent observation in 2011, when the pulsed fraction returned to the pre-outburst $\approx$ 65\% level. For the 2007 observation, we also find that a model consisting of a single 0.4 keV hot spot with a magnetic field strength of $1.8 \times 10^{14}$ G accounts for the spectra obtained at three different pulse phases but under predicts the flux at the pulse minimum, where the contribution to the emission from the cooler component is non-negligible. The inferred temperature of the spot stays approximately constant between different pulse phases, in agreement with a uniform temperature, single hot spot model. These results suggest that the emitting area grows significantly during outbursts but returns to its persistent and significantly smaller size within a few year timescale.
  • We investigated the long-term spin properties of the anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) 1E 1841-045 by performing a temporal analysis of archival RXTE observations spanning about 5.2 yr from 2006 September to 2011 December. We identified two peculiar timing anomalies within ~1 yr of each other: a glitch with Delta(nu)/nu ~ 4.8 x 10^{-6} near MJD 54303; and an anti-glitch with Delta(nu)/nu ~ -5.8 x 10^{-7} near MJD 54656. The glitch that we identified, which is the fourth glitch seen in this source in the 13 yr of RXTE monitoring, is similar to the last two detected glitches. The anti-glitch from 1E 1841-045, however, is the first to be identified. The amplitude of the anti-glitch was comparable with that recently observed in AXP 1E 2259+586. We found no significant variations in the pulsed X-ray output of the source during either the glitch or the anti-glitch. We discuss our results in relation to the standard pulsar glitch mechanisms for the glitch, and to plausible magnetospheric scenarios for the anti-glitch.
  • The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al (2013), we developed a Bayesian method for searching for QPOs in short magnetar bursts, taking into account the effects of the complicated burst structure, and have shown its feasibility on a small sample of bursts. Here, we apply the same method to a much larger sample from a burst storm of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418. We report a candidate signal at 260 Hz in a search of the individual bursts, which is fairly broad. We also find two QPOs at 93 Hz and one at 127 Hz, when averaging periodograms from a number of bursts in individual triggers, at frequencies close to QPOs previously observed in magnetar giant flares. Finally, for the first time, we explore the overall burst variability in the sample, and report a weak anti-correlation between the power-law index of the broadband model characterising aperiodic burst variability, and the burst duration: shorter bursts have steeper power law indices than longer bursts. This indicates that longer bursts vary over a broader range of time scales, and are not simply longer versions of the short bursts.
  • We present the results of our detailed timing studies of an anomalous X-ray pulsar, 1RXS J170849.0-400910, using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations spanning over ~6 yr from 2005 until the end of RXTE mission. We constructed the long-term spin characteristics of the source and investigated time and energy dependence of pulse profile and pulsed count rates. We find that pulse profile and pulsed count rates in the 2-10 keV band do not show any significant variations in ~6 yr. 1RXS J170849.0-400910 has been the most frequently glitching anomalous X-ray pulsar: three spin-up glitches and three candidate glitches were observed prior to 2005. Our extensive search for glitches later in the timeline resulted in no unambiguous glitches though we identified two glitch candidates (with Delta(nu)/nu ~10^{-6}) in two data gaps: a strong candidate around MJD 55532 and another one around MJD 54819, which is slightly less robust. We discuss our results in the context of pulsar glitch models and expectancy of glitches within the vortex unpinning model.
  • We applied the Bayesian blocks representation technique to search for the dimmest bursts from two magnetars: we identified 320 events from SGR J0501+4516 using a deep XMM-Newton observation and 404 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 using two Swift/XRT pointings. The fluence level of our sample for both sources are about 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than earlier studies. We systematically investigated morphological characteristics and duration distributions of these bursts, as these properties are directly obtained from their Bayesian blocks profiles. We also studied the spectral behavior of the dimmest bursts, which were grouped based on the morphological types and fluences. Our results helped us further differentiate the spectral nature of very dim bursts from that of the persistent emission, both fitted with physically motivated continuum emission models. Moreover, we generated the differential burst fluence distribution for these two magnetars in the lowest fluence regime.
  • In order to discern the physical nature of many gamma-ray sources in the sky, we must look not only in spectral and spatial dimensions, but also understand their temporal variability. However, timing analysis of sources with a highly transient nature, such as magnetar bursts, is difficult: standard Fourier techniques developed for long-term variability generally observed, for example, from AGN often do not apply. Here, we present newly developed timing methods applicable to transient events of all kinds, and show their successful application to magnetar bursts observed with Fermi/GBM. Magnetars are a prime subject for timing studies, thanks to the detection of quasi-periodicities in magnetar Giant Flares and their potential to help shed light on the structure of neutron stars. Using state-of-the art statistical techniques, we search for quasi-periodicities (QPOs) in a sample of bursts from Soft Gamma Repeater SGR J0501+4516 observed with Fermi/GBM and provide upper limits for potential QPO detections. Additionally, for the first time, we characterise the broadband variability behaviour of magnetar bursts and highlight how this new information could provide us with another way to probe these mysterious objects.
  • The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. However, with only three giant flares ever recorded, and only two with data of sufficient quality to search for QPOs, such analysis is seriously data limited. We set out a procedure for doing QPO searches in the far more numerous, short, less energetic magnetar bursts. The short, transient nature of these bursts requires the implementation of sophisticated statistical techniques to make reliable inferences. Using Bayesian statistics, we model the periodogram as a combination of red noise at low frequencies and white noise at high frequencies, which we show is a conservative approach to the problem. We use empirical models to make inferences about the potential signature of periodic and quasi-periodic oscillations at these frequencies. We compare our method with previously used techniques and find that although it is on the whole more conservative, it is also more reliable in ruling out false positives. We illustrate our Bayesian method by applying it to a sample of 27 bursts from the magnetar SGR J0501+4516 observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and we find no evidence for the presence of QPOs in any of the bursts in the unbinned spectra, but do find a candidate detection in the binned spectra of one burst. However, whether this signal is due to a genuine quasi-periodic process, or can be attributed to unmodeled effects in the noise is at this point a matter of interpretation.
  • We present here a detailed spectral study of the X-ray emission of the persistent source and the low-fluence bursts of SGR J0501+4516 observed during a deep XMM-Newton observation near the peak of its 2008 outburst. For the persistent emission we employ a physically motivated continuum emission model and spectroscopically determine important source properties; such as, the surface magnetic field strength and the magnetospheric scattering optical depth. We find that the magnetar surface temperature near the peak of its activity is 0.38 keV, corresponding to an emission area of 131 km^2 at a distance of 2 kpc. The surface magnetic field strength determined spectroscopically, B=2.2E14 G, is consistent with the dipole field strength inferred from the source spin and spin down rate. We fit the stacked spectra of 129 very faint bursts with a modified blackbody model and find a temperature of 1.16 keV, corresponding to an emission area of 93 km^2. We also find an evidence for cooling during the burst decay phase.
  • We present the results of our systematic search for extended emission components following initial short gamma-ray burst (GRB) spikes, using Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) observations. We performed the extended emission search for both short- and long-duration GRBs to unveil the BATSE population of new hybrid class of GRBs similar to GRB 060614. For the identified bursts, we investigate temporal and spectral characteristics of their initial spikes as well as their extended emission. Our results reveal that the fraction of GRBs with extended emission is ~7% of the total number of our BATSE sample. We find that the spectrum of the extended emission is, in general, softer than that of the initial spike, which is in accord with what has been observed in the prototypical bursts, GRB 060614. We also find that the energy fluence of the extended emission varies on a broad range from 0.1 to 40 times of the fluence of the initial spike. We discuss our results in the context of existing physical models, in particular within the two-component jet model.
  • We report on the analysis of two XMM-Newton observations of the recently discovered soft gamma repeater Swift J1834.9-0846, taken in September 2005 and one month after the source went into outburst on 2011 August 7. We performed timing and spectral analyses on the point source as well as on the extended emission. We find that the source period is consistent with an extrapolation of the Chandra ephemeris reported earlier and the spectral properties remained constant. The source luminosity decreased to a level of 1.6x10^34 erg s^-1 following a decay trend of $\propto t^{-0.5}$. Our spatial analysis of the source environment revealed the presence of two extended emission regions around the source. The first (Region A) is a symmetric ring around the point source, starting at 25arcsec and extending to ~50arcsec. We argue that Region A is a dust scattering halo. The second (Region B) has an asymmetrical shape extending between 50arcsec and 150arcsec, and is detected both in the pre- and post-outburst data. We argue that this region is a possible magnetar wind nebula (MWN). The X-ray efficiency of the MWN with respect to the rotation energy loss is substantially higher than those of rotation powered pulsars: $\eta_{\rm X}\equiv L_{\rm MWN,0.5-8 keV}/\dot{E}_{\rm rot}\approx0.7$. The higher efficiency points to a different energy source for the MWN of Swift J1834.9-0846, most likely bursting activity of the magnetar, powered by its high magnetic field, B=1.4x10^14 G.
  • We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT Windowed Timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5 - 200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT/GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zone, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.
  • In early October 2008, the Soft Gamma Repeater SGRJ1550 - 5418 (1E 1547.0 - 5408, AXJ155052 - 5418, PSR J1550 - 5418) became active, emitting a series of bursts which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) after which a second especially intense activity period commenced in 2009 January and a third, less active period was detected in 2009 March-April. Here we analyze the GBM data all the bursts from the first and last active episodes. We performed temporal and spectral analysis for all events and found that their temporal characteristics are very similar to the ones of other SGR bursts, as well the ones reported for the bursts of the main episode (average burst durations \sim 170 ms). In addition, we used our sample of bursts to quantify the systematic uncertainties of the GBM location algorithm for soft gamma-ray transients to < 8 deg. Our spectral analysis indicates significant spectral evolution between the first and last set of events. Although the 2008 October events are best fit with a single blackbody function, for the 2009 bursts an Optically Thin Thermal Bremsstrahlung (OTTB) is clearly preferred. We attribute this evolution to changes in the magnetic field topology of the source, possibly due to effects following the very energetic main bursting episode.
  • We present X-ray observations of the new transient magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846, discovered with Swift BAT on 2011 August 7. The data were obtained with Swift, RXTE, CXO, and XMM-Newton both before and after the outburst. Timing analysis reveals singe peak pulsations with a period of 2.4823 s and an unusually high pulsed fraction, 85+/-10%. Using the RXTE and CXO data, we estimated the period derivative, dot{P}=8\times 10^{-12} s/s, and confirmed the high magnetic field of the source, B=1.4\times 10^{14} G. The decay of the persistent X-ray flux, spanning 48 days, is consistent with a power law, t^{-0.5}. In the CXO/ACIS image, we find that the highly absorbed point source is surrounded by extended emission, which most likely is a dust scattering halo. Swift J1834.9-0846 is located near the center of the radio supernova remnant W41 and TeV source HESS J1834-087. An association with W41 would imply a source distance of about 4 kpc; however, any relation to the HESS source remains unclear, given the presence of several other candidate counterparts for the latter source in the field. Our search for an IR counterpart of Swift J1834.9-0846 revealed no source down to K_s=19.5 within the 0.6' CXO error circle.
  • Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) are bright X-ray sources. Few AXPs emit highly pulsed emission in hard X-rays. Using data collected with the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, we explored high-energy gamma-ray emission from the brightest AXP, 4U 0142+61. We do not detect any significant emission from the source. Here, we present the upper limits to the persistent and pulsed emission of 4U 0142+61 in the high-energy gamma-ray domain.
  • Swift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18-140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8 - 25)E38 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.