• Motivated by multiple phenomenological considerations, we perform the first search for the existence of a $\bar{b}\bar{b}bb$ tetraquark bound state with a mass below the lowest non-interacting bottomonium-pair threshold using the first-principles lattice non-relativistic QCD methodology. We use a full $S$-wave colour/spin basis for the $\bar{b}\bar{b}bb$ operators in the three $0^{++}$, $1^{+-}$ and $2^{++}$ channels. We employ four gluon field ensembles at multiple lattice spacing values ranging from $a = 0.06 - 0.12$ fm, all of which include $u$, $d$, $s$ and $c$ quarks in the sea, and one ensemble which has physical light-quark masses. Additionally, we perform novel exploratory work with the objective of highlighting any signal of a near threshold tetraquark, if it existed, by adding an auxiliary potential into the QCD interactions. With our results we find no evidence of a QCD bound tetraquark below the lowest non-interacting thresholds in the channels studied.
  • There has been much theoretical speculation about the existence of a deeply bounded tetra-bottom state. Such a state would not be expected to be more than a GeV below $\Upsilon\Upsilon$ threshold. If such a state exists below the $\eta_b\eta_b$ threshold it would be narrow, as Zweig allowed strong decays are kinematically forbidden. Given the observation of $\Upsilon$ pair production at CMS, such a state with a large branching fraction into $\Upsilon \Upsilon^*$ is likely discoverable at the LHC. The discovery mode is similar to the SM Higgs decaying into four leptons through the $Z Z^*$ channel. The testable features of both production and the four lepton decays of such a tetra-bottom ground state are presented. The assumptions required for each feature are identified, allowing the application of our results more generally to a resonance decaying into four charged leptons (through the $\Upsilon\Upsilon^*$ channel) in the same mass region.
  • Andreas S. Kronfeld, Robert S. Tschirhart, Usama Al-Binni, Wolfgang Altmannshofer, Charles Ankenbrandt, Kaladi Babu, Sunanda Banerjee, Matthew Bass, Brian Batell, David V. Baxter, Zurab Berezhiani, Marc Bergevin, Robert Bernstein, Sudeb Bhattacharya, Mary Bishai, Thomas Blum, S. Alex Bogacz, Stephen J. Brice, Joachim Brod, Alan Bross, Michael Buchoff, Thomas W. Burgess, Marcela Carena, Luis A. Castellanos, Subhasis Chattopadhyay, Mu-Chun Chen, Daniel Cherdack, Norman H. Christ, Tim Chupp, Vincenzo Cirigliano, Pilar Coloma, Christopher E. Coppola, Ramanath Cowsik, J. Allen Crabtree, André de Gouvêa, Jean-Pierre Delahaye, Dmitri Denisov, Patrick deNiverville, Ranjan Dharmapalan, Markus Diefenthaler, Alexander Dolgov, Georgi Dvali, Estia Eichten, Jürgen Engelfried, Phillip D. Ferguson, Tony Gabriel, Avraham Gal, Franz Gallmeier, Kenneth S. Ganezer, Susan Gardner, Douglas Glenzinski, Stephen Godfrey, Elena S. Golubeva, Stefania Gori, Van B. Graves, Geoffrey Greene, Cory L. Griffard, Ulrich Haisch, Thomas Handler, Brandon Hartfiel, Athanasios Hatzikoutelis, Ayman Hawari, Lawrence Heilbronn, James E. Hill, Patrick Huber, David E. Jaffe, Xiaodong Jiang, Christian Johnson, Yuri Kamyshkov, Daniel M. Kaplan, Boris Kerbikov, Brendan Kiburg, Harold G. Kirk, Andreas Klein, Kyle Knoepfel, Boris Kopeliovich, Vladimir Kopeliovich, Joachim Kopp, Wolfgang Korsch, Graham Kribs, Ronald Lipton, Chen-Yu Liu, Wolfgang Lorenzon, Zheng-Tian Lu, Naomi C. R. Makins, David McKeen, Geoffrey Mills, Michael Mocko, Rabindra Mohapatra, Nikolai V. Mokhov, Guenter Muhrer, Pieter Mumm, David Neuffer, Lev Okun, Mark A. Palmer, Robert Palmer, Robert W. Pattie Jr., David G. Phillips II, Kevin Pitts, Maxim Pospelov, Vitaly S. Pronskikh, Chris Quigg, Erik Ramberg, Amlan Ray, Paul E. Reimer, David G. Richards, Adam Ritz, Amit Roy, Arthur Ruggles, Robert Ryne, Utpal Sarkar, Andy Saunders, Yannis K. Semertzidis, Anatoly Serebrov, Hirohiko Shimizu, Robert Shrock, Arindam K. Sikdar, Pavel V. Snopok, William M. Snow, Aria Soha, Stefan Spanier, Sergei Striganov, Zhaowen Tang, Lawrence Townsend, Jon Urheim, Arkady Vainshtein, Richard Van de Water, Ruth S. Van de Water, Richard J. Van Kooten, Bernard Wehring, William C. Wester III, Lisa Whitehead, Robert J. Wilson, Elizabeth Worcester, Albert R. Young, Geralyn Zeller
    Part 2 of "Project X: Accelerator Reference Design, Physics Opportunities, Broader Impacts". In this Part, we outline the particle-physics program that can be achieved with Project X, a staged superconducting linac for intensity-frontier particle physics. Topics include neutrino physics, kaon physics, muon physics, electric dipole moments, neutron-antineutron oscillations, new light particles, hadron structure, hadron spectroscopy, and lattice-QCD calculations. Part 1 is available as arXiv:1306.5022 [physics.acc-ph] and Part 3 is available as arXiv:1306.5024 [physics.acc-ph].
  • Very recently, the Belle and BESIII experiments observed a new charmonium-like state $X(3823)$, which is a good candidate for the $D$-wave charmonium $\psi(1^3D_2)$. Because the $X(3823)$ is just near the $D\bar{D}^*$ threshold, the decay $X(3823)\to J/\psi\pi^+\pi^-$ can be a golden channel to test the significance of coupled-channel effects. In this work, this decay is considered including both the hidden-charm dipion and the usual quantum chromodynamics multipole expansion (QCDME) contributions. The partial decay width, the dipion invariant mass spectrum distribution $\mathrm{d}\Gamma[X(3823)\to J/\psi\pi^+\pi^-]/\mathrm{d}m_{\pi^+\pi^-}$, and the corresponding $\mathrm{d}\Gamma[X(3823)\to J/\psi\pi^+\pi^-]/\mathrm{d}\cos\theta$ distribution are computed. Many parameters are determined from existing experimental data, so the results depend mainly only on one unknown phase between the QCDME and hidden-charm dipion amplitudes.
  • Muon-based facilities offer unique potential to provide capabilities at both the Intensity Frontier with Neutrino Factories and the Energy Frontier with Muon Colliders. They rely on a novel technology with challenging parameters, for which the feasibility is currently being evaluated by the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). A realistic scenario for a complementary series of staged facilities with increasing complexity and significant physics potential at each stage has been developed. It takes advantage of and leverages the capabilities already planned for Fermilab, especially the strategy for long-term improvement of the accelerator complex being initiated with the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) and the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF). Each stage is designed to provide an R&D platform to validate the technologies required for subsequent stages. The rationale and sequence of the staging process and the critical issues to be addressed at each stage, are presented.
  • A lepton collider in the multi-TeV range has the potential to measure the trilinear Higgs self-coupling constant $\lambda_{hhh}$ via the W-fusion mode $\ell^+\ell^- \rightarrow \nu_\ell \bar{\nu}_\ell h h$. In this paper we do a generator-level study to explore how center-of-mass energy spread, cone size, tracking resolution, and collision energy range affect how precisely a muon collider can measure $\lambda_{hhh}$ in comparison to an $e^+e^-$ collider. The smaller spread in center-of-mass energy and higher energy range of a muon collider improve cross section while the larger cone required to reduce beam-induced background hinders detection of double-Higgs events. Our results motivate a more detailed study of a multi-TeV muon collider and innovative detector and analysis technologies required for background rejection and precision measurement.
  • In this Snowmass White Paper, we discuss physics opportunities involving heavy quarkonia at the intensity and energy frontiers of high energy physics. We focus primarily on two specific aspects of quarkonium physics for which significant advances can be expected from experiments at both frontiers. The first aspect is the spectroscopy of charmonium and bottomonium states above the open-heavy-flavor thresholds. Experiments at e^+ e^- colliders and at hadron colliders have discovered many new, unexpected quarkonium states in the last 10 years. Many of these states are surprisingly narrow, and some have electric charge. The observations of these charged quarkonium states are the first definitive discoveries of manifestly exotic hadrons. These results challenge our understanding of the QCD spectrum. The second aspect is the production of heavy quarkonium states with large transverse momentum. Experiments at the LHC are measuring quarkonium production with high statistics at unprecedented values of p_T. Recent theoretical developments may provide a rigorous theoretical framework for inclusive production of quarkonia at large p_T. Experiments at the energy frontier will provide definitive tests of this framework. Experiments at the intensity frontier also provide an opportunity to understand the exclusive production of quarkonium states.
  • We propose the construction of, and describe in detail, a compact Muon Collider s-channel Higgs Factory.
  • We propose the construction of a compact Muon Collider Higgs Factory. Such a machine can produce up to \sim 14,000 at 8\times 10^{31} cm^-2 sec^-1 clean Higgs events per year, enabling the most precise possible measurement of the mass, width and Higgs-Yukawa coupling constants.
  • We show that a muon collider is ideally suited for the study of heavy H/A scalars, cousins of the Higgs boson found in two-Higgs doublet models and required in supersymmetric models. The key aspects of H/A are: (1) they are narrow, yet have a width-to-mass ratio far larger than the expected muon collider beam-energy resolution, and (2) the larger muon Yukawa allows efficient s-channel production. We study in detail a representative Natural Supersymmetry model which has a 1.5 Tev H/A with $m_H$- $m_A$ = 10 Gev. The large event rates at resonant peak allow the determination of the individual H and A resonance parameters (including CP) and the decays into electroweakinos provides a wealth of information unavailable to any other present or planned collider.
  • We propose a "Higgs impostor" model for the 125 GeV boson, $X$, recently discovered at the LHC. It is a technipion, $\eta_T$, with $I^G J^{PC} = 0^- 0^{-+}$ expected in this mass region in low-scale technicolor. Its coupling to pairs of standard-model gauge bosons are dimension-five operators whose strengths are determined within the model. It is easy for the gluon fusion rate $\sigma B(gg \to \eta_T \to \gamma\gamma)$ to agree with the measured one, but $\eta_T \to ZZ^*,\,WW^*$ are greatly suppressed relative to the standard-model Higgs rates. This is a crucial test of our proposal. In this regard, we assess the most recent data on $X$ decay modes, with a critical discussion of $X \to ZZ^* \to 4\ell$. In our model the $\eta_T$ mixes almost completely with the isovector $\pi^0_T$, giving two similar states, $\eta_L$ at 125 Gev and $\eta_H$ higher, possibly in the range 170--190 Gev. Important consequences of this mixing are (1) the only associated production of et al is via $\to \to W \eta_L$, and this could be sizable; (2) $\eta_H$ may soon be accessible in $gg \to \eta_H \to \gamma\gamma$; and (3) LSTC phenomenology at the LHC is substantially modified.
  • Under the assumption that the dijet excess seen by the CDF Collaboration near 150 Gev in Wjj production is due to the lightest technipion of the low-scale technicolor process $\rho_T \rightarrow W \pi_T$, we study its observability in LHC detectors for 8 TeV collisions and 20 inverse femtobarns of integrated luminosity. We describe interesting new kinematic tests that can provide independent confirmation of this LSTC hypothesis. We show that cuts similar to those employed by CDF, and recently by ATLAS, cannot confirm the dijet signal. We propose cuts tailored to the LSTC hypothesis and its backgrounds at the LHC that may reveal $\rho_T \rightarrow \ell\nu jj$. Observation of the isospin-related channel $\rho^{\pm}_T \rightarrow Z \pi^{\pm}_T \rightarrow \ell^+\ell^- jj$ and of $\rho^{\pm}_T \rightarrow WZ$ in the $\ell^+\ell^-\ell^{pm}\nu_\ell$ and $\ell^+\ell^- jj$ modes will be important confirmations of the LSTC interpretation of the CDF signal. The $Z\pi_T$ channel is experimentally cleaner than $W\pi_T$ and its rate is known from $W\pi_T$ by phase space. It can be discovered or excluded with the collider data expected by the end of 2012. The $WZ \rightarrow 3\ell\nu$ channel is cleanest of all and its rate is determined from $W\pi_T$ and the LSTC parameter $\sin\chi$. This channel and $WZ \to \ell^+\ell^- jj$ are discussed as a function of $\sin\chi$.
  • Under the assumption that the dijet excess seen by the CDF Collaboration near 150 Gev in Wjj production is due to the lightest technipion of the low-scale technicolor process $\rho_T \rightarrow W \pi_T$, we study its observability in LHC detectors with 1--20 inverse femtobarns of data. We describe interesting new kinematic tests that can provide independent confirmation of this LSTC hypothesis. We find that cuts similar to those employed by CDF, and recently by ATLAS, cannot confirm the dijet signal. We propose cuts tailored to the LSTC hypothesis and its backgrounds at the LHC that may reveal $\rho_T \rightarrow \ell\nu jj$. Observation of the isospin-related channel $\rho^{pm}_T \rightarrow Z \pi^{pm}_T \rightarrow \ell^+ \ell^- jj$ and of $\rho^{pm}_T \rightarrow WZ$ in the three lepton plus neutrino and dilepton plus dijet modes will be important confirmations of the LSTC interpretation of the CDF signal. The $Z\pi_T$ channel is experimentally cleaner than $W\pi_T$ and its rate is known from $W\pi_T$ by phase space. It can be discovered or excluded with the collider data expected in 2012. The $WZ \rightarrow 3\ell\nu$ channel is cleanest of all and its rate is determined from $W\pi_T$ and the LSTC parameter $\sin\chi$. This channel and $WZ \rightarrow \ell^+\ell^- jj$ are discussed as a function of $\sin\chi$.
  • Under the assumption that the dijet excess seen by the CDF Collaboration near 150 Gev in Wjj production is due to the lightest technipion of the low-scale technicolor process $\rho_T \rightarrow W \pi_T$, we study its observability in LHC detectors with 1-5 fb^{-1} of data. We find that cuts similar to those employed by CDF are unlikely to confirm its signal. We propose cuts tailored to the LSTC hypothesis and its backgrounds at the LHC that can reveal $\pi_T \rightarrow jj$. We also stress the importance at the LHC of the isospin-related channel $\rho^{\pm}_T \rightarrow Z\pi^{\pm}_T \rightarrow \ell\ell jj$ and the all-lepton mode $\rho^{pm}_T \rightarrow WZ \rightarrow 3\ell + \nu$.
  • The Tevatron experiments CDF and DO are close to making definitive statements about the technicolor discovery mode rho_T -> W pi_T for M(rho_T) <~ 230 GeV and M(pi_T) <~ 125 GeV. We propose new incisive tests for this mode and searches for others that may be feasible at the Tevatron and certainly are at the LHC. The other searches include two long discussed, namely, omega_T -> gamma pi_T and l+l-, and a new one -- for the I^G J^{PC} = 1^- 1^{++} partner, a_T, of the rho_T. Adopting the argument that the technicolor contribution to S is reduced if M(a_T) is near M(rho_T), we enumerate important a_T decays and estimate production rates at the colliders.
  • Valuable data on quarkonia (the bound states of a heavy quark Q=c,b and the corresponding antiquark) have recently been provided by a variety of sources, mainly e+ e- collisions, but also hadronic interactions. This permits a thorough updating of the experimental and theoretical status of electromagnetic and strong transitions in quarkonia. We discuss QQbar transitions to other QQbar states, with some reference to processes involving QQbar annihilation.
  • A detailed study of orbital and radial excited states in D, Ds, B and B_s systems is performed. The chiral quark model provides the framework for the calculation of pseudoscalar meson (pi, K, ...) hadronic transitions among heavy-light excited and ground states. To calculate the excited states masses and wavefunctions, we must resort to a relativistic quark model. Our model includes the leading order corrections in 1/m_(c,b) (e.g. mixing). Numerical results for masses and light hadronic transition rates are compared to existing experimental data. The effective coupling of the chiral quark model can be determined by comparing with independent results from lattice simulations (g^8_A = 0.53 +-/- 0.11) or fitting to known widths (g^8_A = 0.82 +-/- 0.09).
  • We studied the hadronic decays of excited states of heavy mesons (D, D_s, B and B_s) to lighter states by emission of pi, eta or K. Wavefunctions and energy levels of these excited states are determined using a Dirac equation for the light quark in the potential generated by the heavy quark (including first order corrections in the heavy quark expansion). Transition amplitudes are computed in the context of the Heavy Chiral Quark Model.
  • We have carried out numerical studies of vacuum alignment in technicolor models of electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking. The goal is to understand alignment's implications for strong and weak CP nonconservation in quark interactions. In this first part, we restrict our attention to the technifermion sector of simple models. We find several interesting phenomena, including (1) the possibility that all observable phases in the technifermions' unitary vacuum-alignment matrix are integer multiples of \pi/N' where N' \le N, the number of technifermion doublets, and (2) the possibility of exceptionally light pseudoGoldstone technipions.
  • New strong dynamics at the energy scale ~ 1 TeV is an attractive and elegant theoretical ansatz for the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. We review here the theoretical models for strong dynamics, particularly, technicolor theories and their low energy signatures. We emphasize that the fantastic beam energy resolution (sigma_E/E ~10^{-4}) expected at the first muon collider (sqrt{s} = 100-500 GeV) allows the possibility of resolving some extraordinarily narrow technihadron resonances and, Higgs-like techniscalars produced in the s-channel. Investigating indirect probes for strong dynamics such as search for muon compositeness, we find that the muon colliders provide unparallel reaches. A big muon collider (sqrt{s} =3-4 TeV) would be a remarkable facility to study heavy technicolor particles such as the topcolor Z', to probe the dynamics underlying fermion masses and mixings and to fully explore the strongly interacting electroweak sector.
  • In modern technicolor models, there exist very narrow spin-zero and spin-one neutral technihadrons---$pi^0_T$, $rho^0_T$ and $omega_T$---with masses of a few 100 GeV. The large coupling of $\pi^0_T$ to $\mu^+\mu^-$, the direct coupling of $rho^0_T$ and $omega_T$ to the photon and $Z^0$, and the superb energy resolution of the First Muon Collider may make it possible to resolve these technihadrons and produce them at extraordinarily large rates.
  • In multiscale and topcolor-assisted models of walking technicolor, relatively light spin-one technihadrons $\rho_T$ and $\omega_T$ exist and are expected to decay as $\rho_T \to W \pi_T, Z \pi_T$ and $\omega_T \to \gamma \pi_T$. For $M_{\rho_T} \simeq 200 GeV$ and $M_{\pi_T} \simeq 100 GeV$, these processes have cross sections in the picobarn range in $\bar p p$ colisions at the Tevatron and about 10 times larger at the Large Hadron Collider. We demonstrate their detectability with simulations appropriate to Run II conditions at the Tevatron.
  • This is the first of two reports cataloging the principal signatures of electroweak and flavor dynamics at $\pbarp$ and $pp$ colliders. Here, we discuss some of the signatures of dynamical elecroweak and flavor symmetry breaking. The framework for dynamical symmetry breaking we assume is technicolor, with a walking coupling $\alpha_{TC}$, and extended technicolor. The reactions discussed occur mainly at subprocess energies $\sqrt{\hat s} \simle 1 TeV$. They include production of color-singlet and octet technirhos and their decay into pairs of technipions, longitudinal weak bosons, or jets. Technipions, in turn, decay predominantly into heavy fermions. This report will appear in the Proceedings of the 1996 DPF/DPB Summer Study on New Directions for High Energy Physics (Snowmass 96).
  • This is the second of two reports cataloging the principal signatures of electroweak and flavor dynamics at $\pbarp$ and $pp$ colliders. Here, we complete our overview of technicolor with a discussion of signatures specific to topcolor-assisted technicolor. We also review signatures of flavor dynamics associated with quark and lepton substructure. These occur in excess production rates for dijets and dileptons with high $E_T$ and high invariant mass. An important feature of these processes is that they exhibit fairly central angular and rapidity distributions. This report will appear in the Proceedings of the 1996 DPF/DPB Summer Study on New Directions for High Energy Physics (Snowmass 96).
  • In multiscale models of walking technicolor, relatively light color-singlet technipions are produced in $q \ol q$ annihilation in association with longitudinal $W$ and $Z$ bosons and with each other. The technipions decay as $\tpiz \ra b \ol b$ and $\tpip \ra c \ol b$. Their production rates are resonantly enhanced by isovector technirho vector mesons with mass $M_W + M_{\tpi} \simle M_{\tro} \simle 2 M_{\tpi}$. At the Tevatron, these associated production rates are 1--10 picobarns for $M_{\tpi} \simeq 100\,\gev$. Such a low mass technipion requires topcolor-assisted technicolor to suppress the decay $t \ra \tpip b$. Searches for $\tpi\tpi$ production will also be rewarding. Sizable rates are expected if $M_{\tro} \simge 2M_{\tpi} + 10\,\gev$. The isoscalar $\omega_T$ is nearly degenerate with $\tro$ and is expected to be produced at roughly the same rate. The $\omega_T$ should have the distinctive decay modes $\omega_T \ra \gamma \tpiz$ and $Z \tpiz$.