• In the majority of optomechanical experiments, the interaction between light and mechanical motion is mediated by radiation pressure, which arises from momentum transfer of reflecting photons. This is an inherently weak interaction, and optically generated carriers in semiconductors have been predicted to be the mediator of different and potentially much stronger forces. Here we demonstrate optomechanical forces induced by electron-hole pairs in coupled quantum wells embedded into a free-free nanomembrane. We identify contributions from the deformation-potential and piezoelectric coupling and observe optically driven motion about three orders of magnitude larger than expected from radiation pressure. The amplitude and phase of the driven oscillations are controlled by an applied electric field, which tunes the carrier lifetime to match the mechanical period. Our work opens perspectives for not only enhancing the optomechanical interaction in a range of experiments, but also for interfacing mechanical objects with complex macroscopic quantum objects, such as excitonic condensates.
  • Heralded single-photon sources with on-demand readout are promising candidates for quantum repeaters enabling long-distance quantum communication. The need for scalability of such systems requires simple experimental solutions, thus favouring room-temperature systems. For quantum repeater applications, long delays between heralding and single-photon readout are crucial. Until now, this has been prevented in room-temperature atomic systems by fast decoherence due to thermal motion. Here we demonstrate efficient heralding and readout of single collective excitations created in warm caesium vapour. Using the principle of motional averaging we achieve a collective excitation lifetime of $0.27\pm 0.04$ ms, two orders of magnitude larger than previously achieved for single excitations in room-temperature sources. We experimentally verify non-classicality of the light-matter correlations by observing a violation of the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality with $R=1.4\pm 0.1>1$. Through spectral and temporal analysis we identify intrinsic four-wave mixing noise as the main contribution compromising single-photon operation of the source.
  • Generation of entanglement between disparate physical objects is a key ingredient in the field of quantum technologies, since they can have different functionalities in a quantum network. Here we propose and analyze a generic approach to steady-state entanglement generation between two oscillators with different temperatures and decoherence properties coupled in cascade to a common unidirectional light field. The scheme is based on a combination of coherent noise cancellation and dynamical cooling techniques for two oscillators with effective masses of opposite signs, such as quasi-spin and motional degrees of freedom, respectively. The interference effect provided by the cascaded setup can be tuned to implement additional noise cancellation leading to improved entanglement even in the presence of a hot thermal environment. The unconditional entanglement generation is advantageous since it provides a ready-to-use quantum resource. Remarkably, by comparing to the conditional entanglement achievable in the dynamically stable regime, we find our unconditional scheme to deliver virtually identical performance when operated optimally. As an outlook, we point out that the regime of significant entanglement is compatible with sub-standard quantum limit (SQL) sensitivity when applying the hybrid system as a continuous force sensor.
  • The evanescent field surrounding nano-scale optical waveguides offers an efficient interface between light and mesoscopic ensembles of neutral atoms. However, the thermal motion of trapped atoms, combined with the strong radial gradients of the guided light, leads to a time-modulated coupling between atoms and the light mode, thus giving rise to additional noise and motional dephasing of collective states. Here, we present a dipole force free scheme for coupling of the radial motional states, utilizing the strong intensity gradient of the guided mode and demonstrate all-optical coupling of the cesium hyperfine ground states and motional sideband transitions. We utilize this to prolong the trap lifetime of an atomic ensemble by Raman sideband cooling of the radial motion, which has not been demonstrated in nano-optical structures previously. Our work points towards full and independent control of internal and external atomic degrees of freedom using guided light modes only.
  • Quantum mechanics dictates that a continuous measurement of the position of an object imposes a random back action perturbation on its momentum. This randomness translates with time into position uncertainty, thus leading to the well known uncertainty on the measurement of motion. Here we demonstrate that the quantum back action on a macroscopic mechanical oscillator measured in the reference frame of an atomic spin oscillator can be evaded. The collective quantum measurement on this novel hybrid system of two distant and disparate oscillators is performed with light. The mechanical oscillator is a drum mode of a millimeter size dielectric membrane and the spin oscillator is an atomic ensemble in a magnetic field. The spin oriented along the field corresponds to an energetically inverted spin population and realizes an effective negative mass oscillator, while the opposite orientation corresponds to a positive mass oscillator. The quantum back action is evaded in the negative mass setting and is enhanced in the positive mass case. The hybrid quantum system presented here paves the road to entanglement generation and distant quantum communication between mechanical and spin systems and to sensing of force, motion and gravity beyond the standard quantum limit.
  • The small mass and high coherence of nanomechanical resonators render them the ultimate force probe, with applications ranging from biosensing and magnetic resonance force microscopy, to quantum optomechanics. A notorious challenge in these experiments is thermomechanical noise related to dissipation through internal or external loss channels. Here, we introduce a novel approach to defining nanomechanical modes, which simultaneously provides strong spatial confinement, full isolation from the substrate, and dilution of the resonator material's intrinsic dissipation by five orders of magnitude. It is based on a phononic bandgap structure that localises the mode, without imposing the boundary conditions of a rigid clamp. The reduced curvature in the highly tensioned silicon nitride resonator enables mechanical $Q>10^{8}$ at $ 1 \,\mathrm{MHz}$, yielding the highest mechanical $Qf$-products ($>10^{14}\,\mathrm{Hz}$) yet reported at room temperature. The corresponding coherence times approach those of optically trapped dielectric particles. Extrapolation to $4{.}2$ Kelvin predicts $\sim$quanta/ms heating rates, similar to trapped ions.
  • We realise a simple and robust optomechanical system with a multitude of long-lived ($Q>10^7$) mechanical modes in a phononic-bandgap shielded membrane resonator. An optical mode of a compact Fabry-Perot resonator detects these modes' motion with a measurement rate ($96~\mathrm{kHz}$) that exceeds the mechanical decoherence rates already at moderate cryogenic temperatures ($10\,\mathrm{K}$). Reaching this quantum regime entails, i.~a., quantum measurement backaction exceeding thermal forces, and thus detectable optomechanical quantum correlations. In particular, we observe ponderomotive squeezing of the output light mediated by a multitude of mechanical resonator modes, with quantum noise suppression up to -2.4 dB (-3.6 dB if corrected for detection losses) and bandwidths $\lesssim 90\,\mathrm{ kHz}$. The multi-mode nature of the employed membrane and Fabry-Perot resonators lends itself to hybrid entanglement schemes involving multiple electromagnetic, mechanical, and spin degrees of freedom.
  • Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the frst detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.
  • We propose an approach for collective enhancement of precision for remotely located optical lattice clocks and a way of generation of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state of remote clocks. Close to Heisenberg scaling of the clock precision with the number of clocks M can be achieved even for an optical channel connecting clocks with substantial losses. This scenario utilizes a collective quantum nondemolition measurement on clocks with parallel Bloch vectors for enhanced measurement precision. We provide an optimal network solution for distant clocks as well as for clocks positioned in close proximity of each other. In the second scenario, we employ collective dissipation to drive two clocks with oppositely oriented Bloch vectors into a steady state entanglement. The corresponding EPR entanglement provides enhanced time sharing beyond the projection noise limit between the two quantum synchronized clocks protected from eavesdropping, as well as allows better characterization of systematic effects.
  • A common knowledge suggests that trajectories of particles in quantum mechanics always have quantum uncertainties. These quantum uncertainties set by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle limit precision of measurements of fields and forces, and ultimately give rise to the standard quantum limit in metrology. With the rapid developments of sensitivity of measurements these limits have been approached in various types of measurements including measurements of fields and acceleration. Here we show that a quantum trajectory of one system measured relatively to the other "reference system" with an effective negative mass can be quantum uncertainty--free. The method crucially relies on the generation of an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled state of two objects, one of which has an effective negative mass. From a practical perspective these ideas open the way towards force and acceleration measurements at new levels of sensitivity far below the standard quantum limit.
  • In the production of tapered optical fibers, it is important to control the fiber shape according to application-dependent requirements and to ensure adiabatic tapers. Especially in the transition regions, the fiber shape depends on the heater properties. The axial viscosity profile of the fiber within the heater can, however, be hard to access and is therefore often approximated by assuming a uniform temperature distribution. We present a method for easy experimental calibration of the viscosity profile within the heater. This allows the determination of the resultant fiber shape for arbitrary pulling procedures, using only an additional camera and the fiber drawing setup itself. We find very good agreement between the modeled and measured fiber shape.
  • Dielectric membranes with exceptional mechanical and optical properties present one of the most promising platforms in quantum opto-mechanics. The performance of stressed silicon nitride nanomembranes as mechanical resonators notoriously depends on how their frame is clamped to the sample mount, which in practice usually necessitates delicate, and difficult-to-reproduce mounting solutions. Here, we demonstrate that a phononic bandgap shield integrated in the membrane's silicon frame eliminates this dependence, by suppressing dissipation through phonon tunneling. We dry-etch the membrane's frame so that it assumes the form of a $\mathrm{cm}$-sized bridge featuring a 1-dimensional periodic pattern, whose phononic density of states is tailored to exhibit one, or several, full band gaps around the membrane's high-$Q$ modes in the MHz-range. We quantify the effectiveness of this phononic bandgap shield by optical interferometry measuring both the suppressed transmission of vibrations, as well as the influence of frame clamping conditions on the membrane modes. We find suppressions up to $40~\mathrm{dB}$ and, for three different realized phononic structures, consistently observe significant suppression of the dependence of the membrane's modes on sample clamping - if the mode's frequency lies in the bandgap. As a result, we achieve membrane mode quality factors of $5\times 10^{6}$ with samples that are tightly bolted to the $8~\mathrm{K}$-cold finger of a cryostat. $Q\times f$-products of $6\times 10^{12}~\mathrm{Hz}$ at $300~\mathrm{K}$ and $14\times 10^{12}~\mathrm{Hz}$ at $8~\mathrm{K}$ are observed, satisfying one of the main requirements for optical cooling of mechanical vibrations to their quantum ground-state.
  • Due to their exceptional mechanical and optical properties, dielectric silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators have become the centerpiece of many optomechanical experiments. Efficient capacitive coupling of the membrane to an electrical system would facilitate exciting hybrid optoelectromechanical devices. However, capacitive coupling of such dielectric membranes is rather weak. Here we add a single layer of graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling of graphene coated membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane. Our results show that a single layer of graphene substantially enhances the electromechanical capacitive coupling without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of SiN micromembrane resonators.
  • Most protocols for Quantum Information Processing consist of a series of quantum gates, which are applied sequentially. In contrast, interactions, for example between matter and fields, as well as measurements such as homodyne detection of light, are typically continuous in time. We show how the ability to perform quantum operations continuously and deterministically can be leveraged for inducing non-local dynamics between two separate parties. We introduce a scheme for the engineering of an interaction between two remote systems and present a protocol which induces a dynamics in one of the parties, which is controlled by the other one. Both schemes apply to continuous variable systems, run continuously in time and are based on real-time feedback.
  • We study the effects of high optical depth and density on the performance of a light-atom quantum interface. An in-situ imaging method, a dual-port polarization contrast technique, is presented. This technique is able to compensate for image distortions due to refraction. We propose our imaging method as a tool to characterize atomic ensembles for high capacity spatial multimode quantum memories. Ultracold dense inhomogeneous Rubidium samples are imaged and we find a resonant optical depth as high as 680 on the D1 line. The measurements are compared with light-atom interaction models based on Maxwell-Bloch equations. We find that an independent atom assumption is insufficient to explain our data and present corrections due to resonant dipole-dipole interactions.
  • Cooling of the mechanical motion of a GaAs nano-membrane using the photothermal effect mediated by excitons was recently demonstrated by some of us [K. Usami, et al., Nature Phys. 8, 168 (2012)] and provides a clear example of the use of thermal forces to cool down mechanical motion. Here, we report on a single-free-parameter theoretical model to explain the results of this experiment which matches the experimental data remarkably well.
  • We provide a straightforward demonstration of a fundamental difference between classical and quantum mechanics for a single local system; namely the absence of a joint probability distribution of the position $x$ and momentum $p$. Elaborating on a recently reported criterion by Bednorz and Belzig [Phys. Rev. A {\bf 83}, 52113] we derive a simple criterion that must be fulfilled for any joint probability distribution in classical physics. We demonstrate the violation of this criterion using homodyne measurement of a single photon state, thus proving a straightforward signature of the breakdown of a classical description of the underlying state. Most importantly, the criterion used does not rely on quantum mechanics and can thus be used to demonstrate non-classicality of systems not immediately apparent to exhibit quantum behavior. The criterion is directly applicable any system described by the continuous canonical variables x and p, such as a mechanical or an electrical oscillator and a collective spin of a large ensemble.
  • Following a recent proposal [C. Muschik et. al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 052312 (2011)], engineered dissipative processes have been used for the generation of stable entanglement between two macroscopic atomic ensembles at room temperature [H. Krauter et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 080503 (2011)]. This experiment included the preparation of entangled states which are continuously available during a time interval of one hour. Here, we present additional material, further-reaching data and an extension of the theory developed in [C. Muschik et. al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 052312 (2011)]. In particular, we show how the combination of the entangling dissipative mechanism with measurements can give rise to a substantial improvement of the generated entanglement in the presence of noise.
  • This article reviews recent research towards a universal light-matter interface. Such an interface is an important prerequisite for long distance quantum communication, entanglement assisted sensing and measurement, as well as for scalable photonic quantum computation. We review the developments in light-matter interfaces based on room temperature atomic vapors interacting with propagating pulses via the Faraday effect. This interaction has long been used as a tool for quantum nondemolition detections of atomic spins via light. It was discovered recently that this type of light-matter interaction can actually be tuned to realize more general dynamics, enabling better performance of the light-matter interface as well as rendering tasks possible, which were before thought to be impractical. This includes the realization of improved entanglement assisted and backaction evading magnetometry approaching the Quantum Cramer-Rao limit, quantum memory for squeezed states of light and the dissipative generation of entanglement. A separate, but related, experiment on entanglement assisted cold atom clock showing the Heisenberg scaling of precision is described. We also review a possible interface between collective atomic spins with nano- or micromechanical oscillators, providing a link between atomic and solid state physics approaches towards quantum information processing.
  • We present a simple fabrication method for the realization of suspended GaAs nanomembranes for cavity quantum optomechanics experiments. GaAs nanomembranes with an area of 1.36 mm by 1.91 mm and a thickness of 160 nm are obtained by using a two-step selective wet-etching technique. The frequency noise spectrum reveals several mechanical modes in the kilohertz regime with mechanical Q-factors up to 2,300,000 at room temperature. The measured mechanical mode profiles agree well with a taut rectangular drumhead model. Our results show that GaAs nanomembranes provide a promising path towards quantum optical control of massive nanomechanical systems.
  • Entanglement is a striking feature of quantum mechanics and an essential ingredient in most applications in quantum information. Typically, coupling of a system to an environment inhibits entanglement, particularly in macroscopic systems. Here we report on an experiment, where dissipation continuously generates entanglement between two macroscopic objects. This is achieved by engineering the dissipation using laser- and magnetic fields, and leads to robust event-ready entanglement maintained for 0.04s at room temperature. Our system consists of two ensembles containing about 10^{12} atoms and separated by 0.5m coupled to the environment composed of the vacuum modes of the electromagnetic field. By combining the dissipative mechanism with a continuous measurement, steady state entanglement is continuously generated and observed for up to an hour.
  • We propose a simple heralded amplification scheme for small rotations of the collective spin of an ensemble of particles. Our protocol makes use of two basic primitives for quantum memories, namely partial mapping of light onto an ensemble, and conversion of a collective spin excitation into light. The proposed scheme should be realizable with current technology, with potential applications to atomic clocks and magnetometry.
  • Weak measurements in combination with post-selection can give rise to a striking amplification effect (related to a large "weak value"). We show that this effect can be understood by viewing the initial state of the pointer as the ground state of a fictional harmonic oscillator, helping us to clarify the transition from the weak-value regime to conventional dark-port interferometry. We then describe how to implement fully quantum weak-value measurements combining photons and atomic ensembles.
  • Up to date, the life time of experimentally demonstrated entangled states has been limited, due to their fragility under decoherence and dissipation. Therefore, they are created under strict isolation conditions. In contrast, new approaches harness the coupling of the system to the environment, which drives the system into the desired state. Following these ideas, we present a robust method for generating steady state entanglement between two distant atomic ensembles. The proposed scheme relies on the interaction of the two atomic systems with the common vacuum modes of the electromagnetic field which act as an engineered environment. We develop the theoretical framework for two level systems including dipole-dipole interactions and complement these results by considering the implementation in multi-level ground states.
  • We propose a hybrid (continuous-discrete variable) quantum repeater protocol for distribution of entanglement over long distances. Starting from entangled states created by means of single-photon detection, we show how entangled coherent state superpositions, also known as `Schr\"odinger cat states', can be generated by means of homodyne detection of light. We show that near-deterministic entanglement swapping with such states is possible using only linear optics and homodyne detectors, and we evaluate the performance of our protocol combining these elements.