• Data-driven transformations that reformulate nonlinear systems in a linear framework have the potential to enable the prediction, estimation, and control of strongly nonlinear dynamics using linear systems theory. The Koopman operator has emerged as a principled linear embedding of nonlinear dynamics, and its eigenfunctions establish intrinsic coordinates along which the dynamics behave linearly. In this work, we demonstrate a data-driven control architecture, termed Koopman Reduced Order Nonlinear Identification and Control (KRONIC), that utilizes Koopman eigenfunctions to manipulate nonlinear systems using linear systems theory. We approximate these eigenfunctions with data-driven regression and power series expansions, based on the partial differential equation governing the infinitesimal generator of the Koopman operator. Although previous regression-based methods may identify spurious dynamics, we show that lightly damped eigenfunctions may be faithfully extracted using sparse regression. These lightly damped eigenfunctions are particularly relevant for control, as they correspond to nearly conserved quantities that are associated with persistent dynamics, such as the Hamiltonian. We derive the form of control in these intrinsic eigenfunction coordinates and design nonlinear controllers using standard linear control theory. KRONIC is then demonstrated on a number of relevant examples, including 1) a nonlinear system with a known linear embedding, 2) a variety of Hamiltonian systems, and 3) a high-dimensional double-gyre model for ocean mixing.
  • We advance Machine Learning Control (MLC), a recently proposed model-free control framework which explores and exploits strongly nonlinear dynamics in an unsupervised manner. The assumed plant has multiple actuators and sensors and its performance is measured by a cost functional. The control problem is to find a control logic which optimizes the given cost function. The corresponding regression problem for the control law is solved by employing linear genetic programming as an easy and simple regression solver in a high-dimensional control search space. This search space comprises open-loop actuation, sensor-based feedback and combinations thereof, thus generalizing former MLC studies. This methodology is denoted as linear genetic programming control (LGPC). Focus of this study is the frequency crosstalk between unforced unstable oscillation and the actuation at different frequencies. LGPC is first applied to the stabilization of a forced nonlinearly coupled three-oscillator model comprising open- and closed-loop frequency crosstalk mechanisms. LGPC performance is then demonstrated in a turbulence control experiment, achieving 22% drag reduction for a simplified car model. For both cases, LGPC identifies the best nonlinear control achieving the optimal performance by exploiting frequency crosstalk. Our control strategy is suited to complex control problems with multiple actuators and sensors featuring nonlinear actuation dynamics.
  • Characterizing and controlling nonlinear, multi-scale phenomena play important roles in science and engineering. Cluster-based reduced-order modeling (CROM) was introduced to exploit the underlying low-dimensional dynamics of complex systems. CROM builds a data-driven discretization of the Perron-Frobenius operator, resulting in a probabilistic model for ensembles of trajectories. A key advantage of CROM is that it embeds nonlinear dynamics in a linear framework, and uncertainty can be managed with data assimilation. CROM is typically computed on high-dimensional data, however, access to and computations on this full-state data limit the online implementation of CROM for prediction and control. Here, we address this key challenge by identifying a small subset of critical measurements to learn an efficient CROM, referred to as sparsity-enabled CROM. In particular, we leverage compressive measurements to faithfully embed the cluster geometry and preserve the probabilistic dynamics. Further, we show how to identify fewer optimized sensor locations tailored to a specific problem that outperform random measurements. Both of these sparsity-enabled sensing strategies significantly reduce the burden of data acquisition and processing for low-latency in-time estimation and control. We illustrate this unsupervised learning approach on three different high-dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems from fluids with increasing complexity, with one application in flow control. Sparsity-enabled CROM is a critical facilitator for real-time implementation on high-dimensional systems where full-state information may be inaccessible.
  • We investigate open- and closed-loop active control for aerodynamic drag reduction of a car model. Turbulent flow around a blunt-edged Ahmed body is examined at $Re_{H}\approx3\times10^{5}$ based on body height. The actuation is performed with pulsed jets at all trailing edges combined with a Coanda deflection surface. The flow is monitored with pressure sensors distributed at the rear side. We apply a model-free control strategy building on Dracopoulos & Kent (Neural Comput. & Applic., vol. 6, 1997, pp. 214-228) and Gautier et al. (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 770, 2015, pp. 442-457). The optimized control laws comprise periodic forcing, multi-frequency forcing and sensor-based feedback including also time-history information feedback and combination thereof. Key enabler is linear genetic programming as simple and efficient framework for multiple inputs (actuators) and multiple outputs (sensors). The proposed linear genetic programming control can select the best open- or closed-loop control in an unsupervised manner. Approximately 33% base pressure recovery associated with 22% drag reduction is achieved in all considered classes of control laws. Intriguingly, the feedback actuation emulates periodic high-frequency forcing by selecting one pressure sensor in the optimal control law. Our control strategy is, in principle, applicable to all multiple actuators and sensors experiments.
  • Understanding the interplay of order and disorder in chaotic systems is a central challenge in modern quantitative science. We present a universal, data-driven decomposition of chaos as an intermittently forced linear system. This work combines Takens' delay embedding with modern Koopman operator theory and sparse regression to obtain linear representations of strongly nonlinear dynamics. The result is a decomposition of chaotic dynamics into a linear model in the leading delay coordinates with forcing by low energy delay coordinates; we call this the Hankel alternative view of Koopman (HAVOK) analysis. This analysis is applied to the canonical Lorenz system, as well as to real-world examples such as the Earth's magnetic field reversal, and data from electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, and measles outbreaks. In each case, the forcing statistics are non-Gaussian, with long tails corresponding to rare events that trigger intermittent switching and bursting phenomena; this forcing is highly predictive, providing a clear signature that precedes these events. Moreover, the activity of the forcing signal demarcates large coherent regions of phase space where the dynamics are approximately linear from those that are strongly nonlinear.
  • The ability to manipulate and control fluid flows is of great importance in many scientific and engineering applications. Here, a cluster-based control framework is proposed to determine optimal control laws with respect to a cost function for unsteady flows. The proposed methodology frames high-dimensional, nonlinear dynamics into low-dimensional, probabilistic, linear dynamics which considerably simplifies the optimal control problem while preserving nonlinear actuation mechanisms. The data-driven approach builds upon a state space discretization using a clustering algorithm which groups kinematically similar flow states into a low number of clusters. The temporal evolution of the probability distribution on this set of clusters is then described by a Markov model. The Markov model can be used as predictor for the ergodic probability distribution for a particular control law. This probability distribution approximates the long-term behavior of the original system on which basis the optimal control law is determined. The approach is applied to a separating flow dominated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz shedding.
  • We propose a novel cluster-based reduced-order modelling (CROM) strategy of unsteady flows. CROM combines the cluster analysis pioneered in Gunzburger's group (Burkardt et al. 2006) and and transition matrix models introduced in fluid dynamics in Eckhardt's group (Schneider et al. 2007). CROM constitutes a potential alternative to POD models and generalises the Ulam-Galerkin method classically used in dynamical systems to determine a finite-rank approximation of the Perron-Frobenius operator. The proposed strategy processes a time-resolved sequence of flow snapshots in two steps. First, the snapshot data are clustered into a small number of representative states, called centroids, in the state space. These centroids partition the state space in complementary non-overlapping regions (centroidal Voronoi cells). Departing from the standard algorithm, the probabilities of the clusters are determined, and the states are sorted by analysis of the transition matrix. Secondly, the transitions between the states are dynamically modelled using a Markov process. Physical mechanisms are then distilled by a refined analysis of the Markov process, e.g. using finite-time Lyapunov exponent and entropic methods. This CROM framework is applied to the Lorenz attractor (as illustrative example), to velocity fields of the spatially evolving incompressible mixing layer and the three-dimensional turbulent wake of a bluff body. For these examples, CROM is shown to identify non-trivial quasi-attractors and transition processes in an unsupervised manner. CROM has numerous potential applications for the systematic identification of physical mechanisms of complex dynamics, for comparison of flow evolution models, for the identification of precursors to desirable and undesirable events, and for flow control applications exploiting nonlinear actuation dynamics.