• The smallest satellites of the Milky Way ceased forming stars during the epoch of reionization and thus provide archaeological access to galaxy formation at $z>6$. Numerical studies of these ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) require expensive cosmological simulations with high mass resolution that are carried out down to $z=0$. However, if we are able to statistically identify UFD host progenitors at high redshifts \emph{with relatively high probabilities}, we can avoid this high computational cost. To find such candidates, we analyze the merger trees of Milky Way type halos from the high-resolution ${\it Caterpillar}$ suite of dark matter only simulations. Satellite UFD hosts at $z=0 $ are identified based on four different abundance matching (AM) techniques. All the halos at high redshifts are traced forward in time in order to compute the probability of surviving as satellite UFDs today. Our results show that selecting potential UFD progenitors based solely on their mass at z=12 (8) results in a 10\% (20\%) chance of obtaining a surviving UFD at $z=0$ in three of the AM techniques we adopted. We find that the progenitors of surviving satellite UFDs have lower virial ratios ($\eta$), and are preferentially located at large distances from the main MW progenitor, while they show no correlation with concentration parameter. Halos with favorable locations and virial ratios are $\approx 3$ times more likely to survive as satellite UFD candidates at $z=0.$
  • Direct observational searches for Population III (Pop III) stars at high redshift are faced with the question of how to select the most promising targets for spectroscopic follow-up. To help answer this, we use a large-scale cosmological simulation, augmented with a new subgrid model that tracks the fraction of pristine gas, to follow the evolution of high-redshift galaxies and the Pop III stars they contain. We generate rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions for our galaxies and find that they are consistent with current $z \ge 7 $ observations. Throughout the redshift range $7 \le z \le 15$ we identify "Pop III-bright" galaxies as those with at least 75% of their flux coming from Pop III stars. While less than 1% of galaxies brighter than $m_{\rm UV, AB} = 31.4$ mag are Pop III--bright in the range $7\leq z \leq8$, roughly 17% of such galaxies are Pop III--bright at $z=9$, immediately before reionization occurs in our simulation. Moving to $z=10$, $m_{\rm UV, AB} = 31.4$ mag corresponds to larger, more luminous galaxies and the Pop III-bright fraction falls off to 5%. Finally, at the highest redshifts, a large fraction (29% at $z=14$ and 41% at $z=15)$ of all galaxies are Pop III-bright regardless of magnitude. While $m_{\rm UV, AB} = 31.4$ mag galaxies are extremely rare during this epoch, we find that 13% of galaxies at $z = 14$ are Pop III-bright with $m_{\rm UV, AB} \le 33$ mag, an intrisic magnitude within reach of the James Webb Space Telescope using lensing. Thus, we predict that the best redshift to search for luminous Pop III--bright galaxies is just before reionization, while lensing surveys for fainter galaxies should push to the highest redshifts possible.
  • We investigate the stellar mass loss of gas rich galaxies falling into clusters due to the change in the gravitational potential caused by the ram pressure stripping of their gas. We model the satellites with exponential stellar and gas disk profiles, assume rapid ram pressure stripping, and follow the stellar orbits in the shocked potential. Due to the change of the potential, the stars move from circular orbits to elliptical orbits with apocenters that are often outside the tidal radius, causing those stars to be stripped. We explore the impact of the redshift of infall, gas fraction, satellite halo mass and cluster mass on this process. The puffing of the satellites makes them appear as ultra diffuse galaxies, and the stripped stars contribute to the intracluster light. Our results show these effects are most significant for less-massive satellites, which have larger gas fractions when they are accreted into clusters. The preferential destruction of low mass systems causes the red fraction of cluster galaxies to be smaller at lower masses, an observation that is otherwise difficult to explain.
  • Motivated by the observed differences in the nebular emission of nearby and high-redshift galaxies, we carry out a set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent astrophysical media exposed to a UV background. The simulations assume a metallicity of $Z/Z_{\odot}$=0.5 and explicitly track ionization, recombination, charge transfer, and ion-by-ion radiative cooling for several astrophysically important elements. Each model is run to a global steady state that depends on the ionization parameter $U$, and the one-dimensional turbulent velocity dispersion, $\sigma_{\rm 1D}$, and the turbulent driving scale. We carry out a suite of models with a T=42,000K blackbody spectrum, $n_e$ = 100 cm$^{-3}$ and $\sigma_{\rm 1D}$ ranging between 0.7 to 42 km s$^{-1},$ corresponding to turbulent Mach numbers varying between 0.05 and 2.6. We report our results as several nebular diagnostic diagrams and compare them to observations of star-forming galaxies at a redshift of $z\approx$2.5, whose higher surface densities may also lead to more turbulent interstellar media. We find that subsonic, transsonic turbulence, and turbulence driven on scales of 1 parsec or greater, have little or no effect on the line ratios. Supersonic, small-scale turbulence, on the other hand, generally increases the computed line emission. In fact with a driving scale $\approx 0.1$ pc, a moderate amount of turbulence, $\sigma_{\rm 1D}$=21-28 km s$^{-1},$ can reproduce many of the differences between high and low redshift observations without resorting to harder spectral shapes.
  • I present a suite of three-dimensional simulations of the evolution of initially-hot material ejected by starburst-driven galaxy outflows. The simulations are conducted in a comoving frame that moves with the material, tracking atomic/ionic cooling, Compton cooling, and dust cooling and destruction. Compton cooling is most efficient of these processes, while the main role of atomic/ionic cooling is to enhance density inhomogeneities. Dust, on the other hand, has little effect on the outflow evolution, and is rapidly destroyed in all the simulations except the case with the smallest mass flux. I use the results to construct a simple steady-state model of the observed UV/optical emission from each outflow. The velocity profiles in this case are dominated by geometric effects, and the overall luminosities are extremely strong functions of the properties of the host system, as observed in ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). Furthermore the luminosities and maximum velocities in several models are consistent with emission-line observations of ULIRGs, although the velocities are significantly greater than observed in absorption-line studies. It may be that absorption line observations of galaxy outflows probe entrained cold material at small radii, while emission-line observations probe cold material condensing from the initially hot medium at larger distances.
  • Recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the extragalactic radio source Centaurus A (Cen A) display a young stellar population around the southwest tip of the inner filament 8.5 kpc from the Cen A galactic center, with ages in the range of 1-3 Myr. Crockett et al. (2012) argue that the transverse bow shock of the Cen A jet triggered this star formation as it impacted dense molecular cores of clouds in the filament. To test this hypothesis, we perform three-dimensional numerical simulations of induced star formation by the jet bow shock in the inner filament of Cen A, using a positivity preserving WENO method to solve the equations of gas dynamics with radiative cooling. We find that star clusters form inside a bow-shocked molecular cloud when the maximum initial density of the cloud is > 40 H2 molecules/cm^3. In a typical molecular cloud of mass 10^6 M_sun and diameter 200 pc, approximately 20 star clusters of mass 10^4 M_sun are formed, matching the HST images.
  • We directly measure the thermal energy of the gas surrounding galaxies through the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. We perform a stacking analysis of microwave background images from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, around 1179 massive quiescent elliptical galaxies at 0.5 <= z <= 1.0 ('low-z') and 3274 galaxies at 1.0 <= z <= 1.5 ('high-z'), selected using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer All-Sky Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) within the SDSS Stripe-82 field. The gas surrounding these galaxies is expected to contain energy from past episodes of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, and after using modeling to subtract undetected contaminants, we detect a tSZ signal at a significance of 0.9-sigma for our low-z galaxies and 1.8-sigma for our high-z galaxies. We then include data from the high-frequency Planck bands for a subset of 227 low-z galaxies and 529 high-z galaxies and find low-z and high-z tSZ detections of 1.0-sigma and 1.5-sigma, respectively. These results indicate an average thermal heating around these galaxies of 5.6(+5.9/-5.6) x 10^60 erg for our low-z galaxies and 7.0(+4.7/-4.4) x 10^60 erg for our high-z galaxies. Based on simple heating models, these results are consistent with gravitational heating without additional heating due to AGN feedback.
  • We make use of new subgrid model of turbulent mixing to accurately follow the cosmological evolution of the first stars, the mixing of their supernova ejecta, and the impact on the chemical composition of the Galactic Halo. Using the cosmological adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, we implement a model for the pollution of pristine gas as described in Pan et al. Tracking the metallicity of Pop III stars with metallicities below a critical value allows us to account for the fraction of Z < Zcrit stars formed even in regions in which the gas' average metallicity is well above Zcrit. We demonstrate that such partially-mixed regions account for 0.5 to 0.7 of all Pop III stars formed up to z = 5. Additionally, we track the creation and transport of "primordial metals" (PM) generated by Pop III supernovae (SNe). These neutron-capture deficient metals are taken up by second-generation stars and likely lead to unique abundance signatures characteristic of carbon-enhanced, metal-poor (CEMP-no) stars. As an illustrative example, we associate primordial metals with abundance ratios used by Keller et al. to explain the source of metals in the star SMSS J031300.36-670839.3, finding good agreement with the observed [Fe/H], [C/H], [O/H], and [Mg/Ca] ratios in CEMP-no Milky Way halo stars. Similar future simulations will aid in further constraining the properties of Pop III stars using CEMP observations, as well as improve predictions of the spatial distribution of Pop III stars, as will be explored by the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes.
  • We study the origin of the cold molecular clumps in quasar outflows, recently detected in CO and HCN emission. We first describe the physical properties of such radiation-driven outflows and show that a transition from a momentum- to an energy-driven flow must occur at a radial distance of R ~ 0.25 kpc. During this transition, the shell of swept up material fragments due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, but these clumps contain little mass and are likely to be rapidly ablated by the hot gas in which they are immersed. We then explore an alternative scenario in which clumps form from thermal instabilities at R >~ 1 kpc, possibly containing enough dust to catalyze molecule formation. We investigate this processes with 3D two-fluid (gas+dust) numerical simulations of a kpc^3 patch of the outflow, including atomic and dust cooling, thermal conduction, dust sputtering, and photoionization from the QSO radiation field. In all cases, dust grains are rapidly destroyed in ~10,000 years; and while some cold clumps form at later times, they are present only as transient features, which disappear as cooling becomes more widespread. In fact, we only find a stable two-phase medium with dense clumps if we artificially enhance the QSO radiation field by a factor 100. This result, together with the complete destruction of dust grains, renders the interpretation of molecular outflows a very challenging problem.
  • Energetic feedback due to active galactic nuclei (AGN) is likely to play an important role in the observed anti-hierarchical trend in the evolution of galaxies, and yet the energy injected into the circumgalactic medium by this process is largely unknown. One promising approach to constrain this feedback is through measurements of CMB spectral distortions due to the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect, whose magnitude is directly proportional to the energy input by AGN. Here we co-add South Pole Telescope SZ (SPT-SZ) survey data around a large set of massive quiescent elliptical galaxies at z >= 0.5. We use data from the Blanco Cosmology Survey and VISTA Hemisphere Survey to create a large catalog of galaxies split up into two redshift bins, with 3394 galaxies at 0.5 <= z <= 1.0 and 924 galaxies at 1.0 <= z <= 1.5, with typical stellar masses of 1.5 x 10^11 M_Sun. We then co-add the emission around these galaxies, resulting in a measured tSZ signal at 2.2 sigma significance for the lower redshift bin and a contaminating signal at 1.1 sigma for the higher redshift bin. To remove contamination due to dust emission, we use SPT-SZ source counts to model a contaminant source population in both the SPT-SZ bands and Planck high-frequency bands for a subset of 937 low-redshift galaxies and 240 high-redshift galaxies. This increases our detection to 3.6 sigma for low redshifts and 0.9 sigma for high redshifts. We find the mean angularly-integrated Compton-y values to be 2.2 (-0.7+0.9) x 10^-7 Mpc^2 for low redshifts and 1.7 (-1.8+2.2) x 10^-7 Mpc^2 for high redshifts, corresponding to total thermal energies of 7.6 (-2.3+3.0) x 10^60 ergs and 6.0 (-6.3+7.7) x 10^60 ergs, respectively. These numbers are higher than expected from simple theoretical models that do not include AGN feedback, and serve as constraints that can be applied to current simulations of massive galaxy formation. (abridged)
  • We perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological zoom simulations of a region around a forming galaxy cluster, comparing the ability of the methods to handle successively more complex baryonic physics. In the simplest, non-radiative case, the two methods are in good agreement with each other, but the SPH simulations generate central cores with slightly lower entropies and virial shocks at slightly larger radii, consistent with what has been seen in previous studies. The inclusion of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback leads to much larger differences between the two methods. Most dramatically, at z=5, rapid cooling in the AMR case moves the accretion shock well within the virial radius, while this shock remains near the virial radius in the SPH case, due to excess heating, coupled with poorer capturing of the shock width. On the other hand, the addition of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) to the simulations results in much better agreement between the methods. In this case both simulations display halo gas entropies of 100 keV cm^2, similar decrements in the star-formation rate, and a drop in the halo baryon content of roughly 30%. This is consistent with AGN growth being self-regulated, regardless of the numerical method. However, the simulations with AGN feedback continue to differ in aspects that are not self-regulated, such that in SPH a larger volume of gas is impacted by feedback, and the cluster still has a lower entropy central core.
  • High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have $\approx 50-100\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$ line-of-sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly-compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds $\approx 35\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}},$ as occurs in the dense disks that have star formation rate densities above $\approx 0.1\,{\rm M}_\odot\,{\rm yr}^{-1}\,{\rm kpc}^{-2}.$ These outflows are triggered by a thermal runaway, arising from the inefficient cooling of hot material coupled with successive heating from turbulent driving. Thus, even in the absence of stellar feedback, a critical value of the star-formation rate density for outflow generation can arise due to a turbulent heating instability. This suggests that in strongly self-gravitating disks, outflows may be enhanced by, but need not caused by, energy input from supernovae.
  • We carry out direct numerical simulations of turbulent astrophysical media exposed to the redshift zero metagalactic background. The simulations assume solar composition and explicitly track ionizations, recombinations, and ion-by-ion radiative cooling for hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sodium, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, calcium, and iron. Each run reaches a global steady state that not only depends on the ionization parameter, $U,$ and mass-weighted average temperature, $T_{\rm MW},$ but also on the the one-dimensional turbulent velocity dispersion, \soned. We carry out runs that span a grid of models with $U$ ranging from 0 to 10$^{-1}$ and \soned\ ranging from 3.5 to 58 km s$^{-1}$, and we vary the product of the mean density and the driving scale of the turbulence, $nL,$ which determines the average temperature of the medium, from $nL =10^{16}$ to $nL =10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$. The turbulent Mach numbers of our simulations vary from $M \approx 0.5$ for the lowest velocity dispersions cases to $M \approx 20$ for the largest velocity dispersion cases. When $M \lesssim1,$ turbulent effects are minimal, and the species abundances are reasonably described as those of a uniform photoionized medium at a fixed temperature. On the other hand, when $M \gtrsim 1,$ dynamical simulations such as the ones carried out here are required to accurately predict the species abundances. We gather our results into a set of tables, to allow future redshift zero studies of the intergalactic medium to account for turbulent effects.
  • We investigate the high-redshift evolution of the restframe UV-luminosity function (LF) of galaxies via hydrodynamical cosmological simulations, coupled with an emulated observational astronomy pipeline that provides a direct comparison with observations. We do this by creating mock images and synthetic galaxy catalogs of approximately 100 square arcminute fields from the numerical model at redshifts ~ 4.5 to 10.4. We include the effects of dust extinction and the point spread function (PSF) for the Hubble WFC3 camera for comparison with space observations. We also include the expected zodiacal background to predict its effect on space observations, including future missions such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). When our model catalogs are fitted to Schechter function parameters, we predict that the faint-end slope alpha of the LF evolves as alpha = -1.16 - 0.12 z over the redshift range z ~ 4.5 to 7.7, in excellent agreement with observations from e.g., Hathi et al. (2010). However, for redshifts z ~ 6 to 10.4, alpha(z) appears to display a shallower evolution, alpha = -1.79 - 0.03 z. Augmenting the simulations with more detailed physics - specifically stellar winds and supernovae (SN) - produces similar results. The model shows an overproduction of galaxies, especially at faint magnitudes, compared with the observations, although the discrepancy is reduced when dust extinction is taken into account.
  • To better understand the nature of the multiphase material found in outflowing galaxies, we study the evolution of cold clouds embedded in flows of hot and fast material. Using a suite of adaptive-mesh refinement simulations that include radiative cooling, we investigate both cloud mass loss and cloud acceleration under the full range of conditions observed in galaxy outflows. The simulations are designed to track the cloud center of mass, enabling us to study the cloud evolution at long disruption times. For supersonic flows, a Mach cone forms around the cloud, which damps the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability but also establishes a streamwise pressure gradient that stretches the cloud apart. If time is expressed in units of the cloud crushing time, both the cloud lifetime and the cloud acceleration rate are independent of cloud radius, and we find simple scalings for these quantities as a function of the Mach number of the external medium. A resolution study suggests that our simulations have sufficient resolution to accurately describe the evolution of cold clouds in the absence of thermal conduction and magnetic fields, physical processes whose roles will be studied in forthcoming papers.
  • We carry out direct numerical simulations of turbulent astrophysical media that explicitly track ionizations, recombinations, and species-by-species radiative cooling. The simulations assume solar composition and follows the evolution of hydrogen, helium, carbon, oxygen, sodium, and magnesium, but they do not include the presence of an ionizing background. In this case, the medium reaches a global steady state that is purely a function of the one-dimensional turbulent velocity dispersion, $\sigma_{\rm 1D},$ and the product of the mean density and the driving scale of turbulence, $n L.$ Our simulations span a grid of models with $\sigma_{\rm 1D}$ ranging from 6 to 58 km s$^{-1}$ and $n L$ ranging from 10$^{16}$ to 10$^{20}$ cm$^{-2},$ which correspond to turbulent Mach numbers from $M=0.2$ to 10.6. The species abundances are well described by single-temperature estimates whenever $M$ is small, but local equilibrium models can not accurately predict the global equilibrium abundances when $M \gtrsim 1.$ To allow future studies to account for nonequilibrium effects in turbulent media, we gather our results into a series of tables, which we will extend in the future to encompass a wider range of elements, compositions, and ionizing processes.
  • We conduct simulations of turbulent mixing in the presence of a magnetic field, grown by the small-scale dynamo. We show that the scalar gradient field, $\nabla C$, which must be large for diffusion to operate, is strongly biased perpendicular to the magnetic field, ${\mathbf B}$. This is true both early-on, when the magnetic field is negligible, and at late times, when the field is strong enough to back react on the flow. This occurs because $\nabla C$ increases within the plane of a compressive motion, but ${\mathbf B}$ increases perpendicular to it. At late times the magnetic field resists compression, making it harder for scalar gradients to grow and likely slowing mixing.
  • Observations have revealed cold gas with large velocity dispersions (~300 km/s) within the hot outflows of ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). This gas may trace its origin to the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) fragmentation of a super-bubble or may arise on smaller scales. We model a ULIRG outflow at two scales to recreate this gas in three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using FLASH. Although resolution is limited, these models successfully produce cold gas in outflows with large velocity dispersions. Our small-scale models produce this cold gas through RT fragmentation of the super-bubble wall, but the large-scale models produce the cold gas after hot bubbles fragment the disc's gas into cold clouds which are then accelerated by thermal pressure, and supplemented by cooling within the outflow. We produce simple mock spectra to compare these simulations to observed absorption spectra and find line-widths of ~250 km/s, agreeing with the lower end of observations.
  • Turbulent motions are essential to the mixing of entrained fluids and are also capable of amplifying weak initial magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo action. Here we perform a systematic study of turbulent mixing in magnetized media, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations that include a scalar concentration field. We focus on how mixing depends on the magnetic Prandtl number, Pm, from 1 to 4 and the Mach number, M}, from 0.3 to 2.4. For all subsonic flows, we find that the velocity power spectrum has a k^-5/3 slope in the early, kinematic phase, but steepens due to magnetic back reactions as the field saturates. The scalar power spectrum, on the other hand, flattens compared to k^-5/3 at late times, consistent with the Obukohov-Corrsin picture of mixing as a cascade process. At higher Mach numbers, the velocity power spectrum also steepens due to the presence of shocks, and the scalar power spectrum again flattens accordingly. Scalar structures are more intermittent than velocity structures in subsonic turbulence while for supersonic turbulence, velocity structures appear more intermittent than the scalars only in the kinematic phase. Independent of the Mach number of the flow, scalar structures are arranged in sheets in both the kinematic and saturated phases of the magnetic field evolution. For subsonic turbulence, scalar dissipation is hindered in the strong magnetic field regions, probably due to Lorentz forces suppressing the buildup of scalar gradients, while for supersonic turbulence, scalar dissipation increases monotonically with increasing magnetic field strength. At all Mach numbers, mixing is significantly slowed by the presence of dynamically-important small-scale magnetic fields, implying that mixing in the interstellar medium and in galaxy clusters is less efficient than modeled in hydrodynamic simulations.
  • The early Universe hosted a large population of small dark matter `minihalos' that were too small to cool and form stars on their own. These existed as static objects around larger galaxies until acted upon by some outside influence. Outflows, which have been observed around a variety of galaxies, can provide this influence in such a way as to collapse, rather than disperse the minihalo gas. Gray & Scannapieco performed an investigation in which idealized spherically-symmetric minihalos were struck by enriched outflows. Here we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations that form realistic minihalos, which we then extract to perform a large suite of simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions including non-equilibrium chemical reactions. In all models, the shocked minihalo forms molecules through non-equilibrium reactions, and then cools to form dense chemically homogenous clumps of star-forming gas. The formation of these high-redshift clusters will be observable with the next generation of telescopes, and the largest of them should survive to the present day, having properties similar to halo globular clusters.
  • In the early universe, substantial relative "stream" velocities between the gas and dark matter arise due to radiation pressure and persist after recombination. To asses the impact of these velocities on high-redshift structure formation, we carry out a suite of high-resolution Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations, which use Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic datasets as initial conditions, converted using a new tool developed for this work. These simulations resolve structures with masses as small as a few 100 M$_\odot$, and we focus on the $10^6$ M$_\odot$ "mini-halos" in which the first stars formed. At $z \approx 17,$ the presence of stream velocities has only a minor effect on the number density of halos below $10^6$ M$_\odot$, but it greatly suppresses gas accretion onto all halos and the dark matter structures around them. Stream velocities lead to significantly lower halo gas fractions, especially for $\approx 10^5$ M$_\odot$ objects, an effect that is likely to depend on the orientation of a halo's accretion lanes. This reduction in gas density leads to colder, more compact radial profiles, and it substantially delays the redshift of collapse of the largest halos, leading to delayed star formation and possibly delayed reionization. These many differences suggest that future simulations of early cosmological structure formation should include stream velocities to properly predict gas evolution, star-formation, and the epoch of reionization.
  • We conduct a comprehensive theoretical and numerical investigation of the pollution of pristine gas in turbulent flows, designed to provide new tools for modeling the evolution of the first generation of stars. The properties of such Population III (Pop III) stars are thought to be very different than later generations, because cooling is dramatically different in gas with a metallicity below a critical value Z_c, which lies between ~10^-6 and 10^-3 solar value. Z_c is much smaller than the typical average metallicity, <Z>, and thus the mixing efficiency of the pristine gas in the interstellar medium plays a crucial role in the transition from Pop III to normal star formation. The small critical value, Z_c, corresponds to the far left tail of the probability distribution function (PDF) of the metallicity. Based on closure models for the PDF formulation of turbulent mixing, we derive equations for the fraction of gas, P, lying below Z_c, in compressible turbulence. Our simulation data shows that the evolution of the fraction P can be well approximated by a generalized self-convolution model, which predicts dP/dt = -n/tau_con P (1-P^(1/n)), where n is a measure of the locality of the PDF convolution and the timescale tau_con is determined by the rate at which turbulence stretches the pollutants. Using a suite of simulations with Mach numbers ranging from M = 0.9 to 6.2, we provide accurate fits to n and tau_con as a function of M, Z_c/<Z>, and the scale, L_p, at which pollutants are added to the flow. For P>0.9, mixing occurs only in the regions surrounding the pollutants, such that n=1. For smaller P, n is larger as mixing becomes more global. We show how the results can be used to construct one-zone models for the evolution of Pop III stars in a single high-redshift galaxy, as well as subgrid models for tracking the evolution of the first stars in large cosmological simulations.
  • Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, $Z \approx 0.1 Z_\odot $ filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, $Z=10^{-3} Z_\odot$ filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.
  • The interstellar medium is a multiphase gas in which turbulent support is as important as thermal pressure. Sustaining this configuration requires both continuous turbulent stirring and continuous radiative cooling to match the decay of turbulent energy. While this equilibrium can persist for small turbulent velocities, if the one-dimensional velocity dispersion is larger than approximately 35 km/s, the gas moves into an unstable regime that leads to rapid heating. I study the implications of this turbulent runaway, showing that it causes a hot gas outflow to form in all galaxies with a gas surface density above approximately 50 solar masses/pc^2 corresponding to a star formation rate per unit area of 0.1$ solar masses/yr/kpc^2. For galaxies with escape velocities above 200 km/s, the sonic point of this hot outflow should lie interior to the region containing cold gas and stars, while for galaxies with smaller escape velocities, the sonic point should lie outside this region. This leads to efficient cold cloud acceleration in higher mass galaxies, while in lower mass galaxies, clouds may be ejected by random turbulent motions rather than accelerated by the wind. Finally, I show that energy balance cannot be achieved at all for turbulent media above a surface density of approximately 10^5 solar masses/pc^2.
  • We report on deep near-infrared F125W (J) and F160W (H) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of the z=6.42 quasar J1148+5251 to attempt to detect rest-frame near-ultraviolet emission from the host galaxy. These observations included contemporaneous observations of a nearby star of similar near-infrared colors to measure temporal variations in the telescope and instrument point spread function (PSF). We subtract the quasar point source using both this direct PSF and a model PSF. Using direct subtraction, we measure an upper limit for the quasar host galaxy of m_J>22.8, m_H>23.0 AB mag (2 sigma). After subtracting our best model PSF, we measure a limiting surface brightness from 0.3"-0.5" radius of mu_J > 23.5, mu_H > 23.7 AB magarc (2 sigma). We test the ability of the model subtraction method to recover the host galaxy flux by simulating host galaxies with varying integrated magnitude, effective radius, and S\'ersic index, and conducting the same analysis. These models indicate that the surface brightness limit (mu_J > 23.5 AB magarc) corresponds to an integrated upper limit of m_J > 22 - 23 AB mag, consistent with the direct subtraction method. Combined with existing far-infrared observations, this gives an infrared excess log(IRX) > 1.0 and corresponding ultraviolet spectral slope beta > -1.2\pm0.2. These values match those of most local luminous infrared galaxies, but are redder than those of almost all local star-forming galaxies and z~6 Lyman break galaxies.