• Chemistry plays an important role in the interstellar medium (ISM), regulating heating and cooling of the gas, and determining abundances of molecular species that trace gas properties in observations. Although solving the time-dependent equations is necessary for accurate abundances and temperature in the dynamic ISM, a full chemical network is too computationally expensive to incorporate in numerical simulations. In this paper, we propose a new simplified chemical network for hydrogen and carbon chemistry in the atomic and molecular ISM. We compare results from our chemical network in detail with results from a full photo-dissociation region (PDR) code, and also with the Nelson & Langer (1999) (NL99) network previously adopted in the simulation literature. We show that our chemical network gives similar results to the PDR code in the equilibrium abundances of all species over a wide range of densities, temperature, and metallicities, whereas the NL99 network shows significant disagreement. Applying our network in 1D models, we find that the $\mathrm{CO}$-dominated regime delimits the coldest gas and that the corresponding temperature tracks the cosmic ray ionization rate in molecular clouds. We provide a simple fit for the locus of $\mathrm{CO}$ dominated regions as a function of gas density and column. We also compare with observations of diffuse and translucent clouds. We find that the $\mathrm{CO}$, $\mathrm{CHx}$ and $\mathrm{OHx}$ abundances are consistent with equilibrium predictions for densities $n=100-1000~\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$, but the predicted equilibrium $\mathrm{C}$ abundance is higher than observations, signaling the potential importance of non-equilibrium/dynamical effects.
  • NGC 253 hosts the nearest bar-fed nuclear starburst. Previous observations show a region rich in molecular gas, with dense clouds and clumps associated with recent star formation. We used ALMA to image the 350 GHz dust continuum and molecular line emission from this region at 2 pc resolution. Our observations reveal 14 bright, compact (~2-3 pc FWHM) knots of dust emission. We argue that most of these sources are likely to be forming super star clusters (SSCs) based on their inferred dynamical and gas masses, association with 36 GHz radio continuum emission, and coincidence with line emission tracing dense, excited gas. One source coincides with a known SSC, but the rest remain largely invisible in Hubble near-IR imaging. Our observations show the presence of dense, highly-excited gas in these objects and imply that gas still makes up a large fraction of their overall mass. The high brightness temperature of the sources even at 350 GHz implies a large optical depth near the peak of the infrared (IR) SED. This suggests that these sources may have large IR photospheres and that the IR radiation force likely exceeds L/c. Still, their moderate observed velocity dispersions suggest that feedback from radiation, winds, and supernovae are not yet disrupting most sources. Several lines of argument suggest that this mode of star formation may produce most of the stars in the burst. We argue for a scenario in which this phase lasts ~1 Myr, after which the clusters shed their natal cocoons but continue to produce ionizing photons and starlight. The strong feedback that drives the observed cold gas and X-ray outflows then likely occurs after the clusters emerge from this early phase.
  • CO(J=1-0) line emission is a widely used observational tracer of molecular gas, rendering essential the X_CO factor, which is applied to convert CO luminosity to H_2 mass. We use numerical simulations to study how X_CO depends on numerical resolution, non-steady-state chemistry, physical environment, and observational beam size. Our study employs 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of galactic disks with solar neighborhood conditions, where star formation and the three-phase interstellar medium (ISM) are self-consistently regulated by gravity and stellar feedback. Synthetic CO maps are obtained by post-processing the MHD simulations with chemistry and radiation transfer. We find that CO is only an approximate tracer of H_2. On parsec scales, W_CO is more fundamentally a measure of mass-weighted volume density, rather than H_2 column density. Nevertheless, $\langle X_\mathrm{CO} \rangle=0.7-1.0\times10^{20}~\mathrm{cm^{-2}K^{-1}km^{-1}s}$ consistent with observations, insensitive to the evolutionary ISM state or radiation field strength if steady-state chemistry is assumed. Due to non-steady-state chemistry, younger molecular clouds have slightly lower X_CO and flatter profiles of X_CO versus extinction than older ones. The CO-dark H_2 fraction is 26-79 %, anti-correlated with the average extinction. As the observational beam size increases from 1 pc to 100 pc, X_CO increases by a factor of ~ 2. Under solar neighborhood conditions, X_CO in molecular clouds is converged at a numerical resolution of 2 pc. However, the total CO abundance and luminosity are not converged even at the numerical resolution of 1 pc. Our simulations successfully reproduce the observed variations of X_CO on parsec scales, as well as the dependence of X_CO on extinction and the CO excitation temperature.
  • Luminous red novae transients, presumably from stellar coalescence, exhibit long-term precursor emission over hundreds of binary orbits leading to impulsive outbursts, with durations similar to a single orbital period. In an effort to understand these signatures, we present and analyze a hydrodynamic model of unstable mass transfer from a giant-star donor onto a more-compact accretor in a binary system. Our simulation begins with mass transfer at the Roche limit separation and traces a phase of runaway decay leading up to the plunge of the accretor within the envelope of the donor. We characterize the fluxes of mass and angular momentum through the system and show that the orbital evolution can be reconstructed from measurements of these quantities. The morphology of outflow from the binary changes significantly as the binary orbit tightens. At wide separations, a thin stream of relatively high-entropy gas trails from the outer Lagrange points. As the orbit tightens, the orbital motion desynchronizes from the donor's rotation, and low-entropy ejecta trace a broad fan of largely-ballistic trajectories. An order-of-magnitude increase in mass ejection rate accompanies the plunge of the accretor with the envelope of the donor. We argue that this transition marks the precursor-to-outburst transition observed in stellar coalescence transients.
  • Cosmic ray pressure gradients transfer energy and momentum to extraplanar gas in disk galaxies, potentially driving significant mass loss as galactic winds. This may be particularly important for launching high-velocity outflows of "cool" (T < 10^4 K) gas. We study cosmic-ray driven disk winds using a simplified semi-analytic model assuming streamlines follow the large-scale gravitational potential gradient. We consider scaled Milky Way-like potentials including a disk, bulge, and halo with a range of halo velocities V_H = 50-300 km/s, and streamline footpoints with radii in the disk R_0=1-16 kpc at height 1 kpc. Our solutions cover a wide range of footpoint gas velocity u_0, magnetic-to-cosmic-ray pressure ratio, gas-to-cosmic-ray pressure ratio, and angular momentum. Cosmic ray streaming at the Alfv\'en speed enables the effective sound speed C_eff to increase from the footpoint to a critical point where C_eff,c = u_c ~ V_H; this differs from thermal winds in which C_eff decreases outward. The critical point is typically at a height of 1-6 kpc from the disk, increasing with V_H, and the asymptotic wind velocity exceeds the escape speed of the halo. Mass loss rates are insensitive to the footpoint values of the magnetic field and angular momentum. In addition to numerical parameter space exploration, we develop and compare to analytic scaling relations. We show that winds have mass loss rates per unit area up to ~ Pi_0 V_H^-5/3 u_0^2/3 where Pi_0 is the footpoint cosmic ray pressure and u_0 is set by the upwelling of galactic fountains. The predicted wind mass-loss rate exceeds the star formation rate for V_H < 200 km/s and u_0 = 50 km/s, a typical fountain velocity.
  • We present results from the EDGE survey, a spatially resolved CO(1-0) follow-up to CALIFA, an optical Integral Field Unit (IFU) survey of local galaxies. By combining the data products of EDGE and CALIFA, we study the variation in molecular gas depletion time ($\tau_{\rm dep}$) on kiloparsec scales in 52 galaxies. We divide each galaxy into two parts: the center, defined as the region within $0.1 \ R_{25}$, and the disk, defined as the region between $0.1$ and $0.7 \ R_{25}$. We find that 14 galaxies show a shorter $\tau_{\rm dep}$ ($\sim 1$ Gyr) in the center relative to that in the disk ($\tau_{\rm dep} \sim 2.4$ Gyrs), which means the central region in those galaxies is more efficient at forming stars per unit molecular gas mass. This finding implies that the centers with shorter $\tau_{\rm dep}$ resemble the intermediate regime between galactic disks and starburst galaxies. Furthermore, the central drop in $\tau_{\rm dep}$ is correlated with a central increase in the stellar surface density, suggesting that a shorter $\tau_{\rm dep}$ is associated with molecular gas compression by the stellar gravitational potential. We argue that varying the CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor only exaggerates the central drop of $\tau_{\rm dep}$.
  • Winds arising from galaxies, star clusters, and active galactic nuclei are crucial players in star and galaxy formation, but it has proven remarkably difficult to use observations of them to determine physical properties of interest, particularly mass fluxes. Much of the difficulty stems from a lack of a theory that links a physically-realistic model for winds' density, velocity, and covering factors to calculations of light emission and absorption. In this paper we provide such a model. We consider a wind launched from a turbulent region with a range of column densities, derive the differential acceleration of gas as a function of column density, and use this result to compute winds' absorption profiles, emission profiles, and emission intensity maps in both optically thin and optically thick species. The model is sufficiently simple that all required computations can be done analytically up to straightforward numerical integrals, rendering it suitable for the problem of deriving physical parameters by fitting models to observed data. We show that our model produces realistic absorption and emission profiles for some example cases, and argue that the most promising methods of deducing mass fluxes are based on combinations of absorption lines of different optical depths, or on combining absorption with measurements of molecular line emission. In the second paper in this series, we expand on these ideas by introducing a set of observational diagnostics that are significantly more robust that those commonly in use, and that can be used to obtain improved estimates of wind properties.
  • We analyze synthetic neutral hydrogen (HI) absorption and emission spectral lines from a high- resolution, three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation to quantify how well observational methods recover the physical properties of interstellar gas. We present a new method for uniformly decomposing HI spectral lines and estimating the properties of associated gas using the Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD) algorithm. We find that Hi spectral lines recover physical structures in the simulation with excellent completeness at high Galactic latitude, and this completeness declines with decreasing latitude due to strong velocity-blending of spectral lines. The temperature and column density inferred from our decomposition and radiative transfer method agree with the simulated values within a factor of < 2 for the majority of gas structures. We next compare synthetic spectra with observations from the 21-SPONGE survey at the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array using AGD. We find more components per line of sight in 21-SPONGE than in synthetic spectra, which reflects insufficient simulated gas scale heights and the limitations of local box simulations. In addition, we find a significant population of low-optical depth, broad absorption components in the synthetic data which are not seen in 21-SPONGE. This population is not obvious in integrated or per-channel diagnostics, and reflects the benefit of studying velocity-resolved components. The discrepant components correspond to the highest spin temperatures (1000 < Ts < 4000 K), which are not seen in 21-SPONGE despite sufficient observational sensitivity. We demonstrate that our analysis method is a powerful tool for diagnosing neutral ISM conditions, and future work is needed to improve observational statistics and implementation of simulated physics.
  • We present a detailed study of a molecular outflow feature in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 using ALMA. We find that this feature is clearly associated with the edge of NGC 253's prominent ionized outflow, has a projected length of ~300 pc, with a width of ~50 pc and a velocity dispersion of ~40 km s^-1, consistent with an ejection from the disk about 1 Myr ago. The kinematics of the molecular gas in this feature can be interpreted (albeit not uniquely) as accelerating at a rate of 1 km s^-1 pc^-1. In this scenario, the gas is approaching escape velocity at the last measured point. Strikingly, bright tracers of dense molecular gas (HCN, CN, HCO+, CS) are also detected in the molecular outflow: We measure an HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) line ratio of ~1/10 in the outflow, similar to that in the central starburst region of NGC 253 and other starburst galaxies. By contrast, the HCN/CO line ratio in the NGC 253 disk is significantly lower (~1/30), similar to other nearby galaxy disks. This strongly suggests that the streamer gas originates from the starburst, and that its physical state does not change significantly over timescales of ~1 Myr during its entrainment in the outflow. Simple calculations indicate that radiation pressure is not the main mechanism for driving the outflow. The presence of such dense material in molecular outflows needs to be accounted for in simulations of galactic outflows.
  • We use numerical simulations to analyze the evolution and properties of superbubbles (SBs), driven by multiple supernovae (SNe), that propagate into the two-phase (warm/cold), cloudy interstellar medium (ISM). We consider a range of mean background densities n_avg=0.1-10 cm^{-3} and intervals between SNe dt_sn=0.01-1 Myr, and follow each SB until the radius reaches (1-2)H, where H is the characteristic ISM disk thickness. Except for embedded dense clouds, each SB is hot until a time t_sf,m when the shocked warm gas at the outer front cools and forms an overdense shell. Subsequently, diffuse gas in the SB interior remains at T_h 10^6-10^7K with expansion velocity v_h~10^2-10^3km/s (both highest for low dt_sn). At late times, the warm shell gas velocities are several 10's to ~100km/s. While shell velocities are too low to escape from a massive galaxy, they are high enough to remove substantial mass from dwarfs. Dense clouds are also accelerated, reaching a few to 10's of km/s. We measure the mass in hot gas per SN, M_h/N_SN, and the total radial momentum of the bubble per SN, p_b/N_SN. After t_sf,m, M_h/N_SN 10-100M_sun (highest for low n_avg), while p_b/N_SN 0.7-3x10^5M_sun km/s (highest for high dt_sn). If galactic winds in massive galaxies are loaded by the hot gas in SBs, we conclude that the mass-loss rates would generally be lower than star formation rates. Only if the SN cadence is much higher than typical in galactic disks, as may occur for nuclear starbursts, SBs can break out while hot and expel up to 10 times the mass locked up in stars. The momentum injection values, p_b/N_SN, are consistent with requirements to control star formation rates in galaxies at observed levels.
  • Radiation feedback from stellar clusters is expected to play a key role in setting the rate and efficiency of star formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs). To investigate how radiation forces influence realistic turbulent systems, we have conducted a series of numerical simulations employing the {\it Hyperion} radiation hydrodynamics solver, considering the regime that is optically thick to ultraviolet (UV) and optically thin to infrared (IR) radiation. Our model clouds cover initial surface densities between $\Sigma_{\rm cl,0} \sim 10-300~M_{\odot}~{\rm pc^{-2}}$, with varying initial turbulence. We follow them through turbulent, self-gravitating collapse, formation of star clusters, and cloud dispersal by stellar radiation. All our models display a lognormal distribution of gas surface density $\Sigma$; for an initial virial parameter $\alpha_{\rm vir,0} = 2$, the lognormal standard deviation is $\sigma_{\rm ln \Sigma} = 1-1.5$ and the star formation rate coefficient $\varepsilon_{\rm ff,\bar\rho} = 0.3-0.5$, both of which are sensitive to turbulence but not radiation feedback. The net star formation efficiency $\varepsilon_\mathrm{final}$ increases with $\Sigma_{\rm cl,0}$ and decreases with $\alpha_{\rm vir,0}$. We interpret these results via a simple conceptual framework, whereby steady star formation increases the radiation force, such that local gas patches at successively higher $\Sigma$ become unbound. Based on this formalism (with fixed $\sigma_{\rm ln \Sigma}$), we provide an analytic upper bound on $\varepsilon_\mathrm{final}$, which is in good agreement with our numerical results. The final star formation efficiency depends on the distribution of Eddington ratios in the cloud and is strongly increased by turbulent compression of gas.
  • To understand the conditions under which dense, molecular gas is able to form within a galaxy, we post-process a series of three-dimensional galactic-disk-scale simulations with ray-tracing based radiative transfer and chemical network integration to compute the equilibrium chemical and thermal state of the gas. In performing these simulations we vary a number of parameters, such as the ISRF strength, vertical scale height of stellar sources, cosmic ray flux, to gauge the sensitivity of our results to these variations. Self-shielding permits significant molecular hydrogen (H2) abundances in dense filaments around the disk midplane, accounting for approximately ~10-15% of the total gas mass. Significant CO fractions only form in the densest, n>~10^3 cm^-3, gas where a combination of dust, H2, and self-shielding attenuate the FUV background. We additionally compare these ray-tracing based solutions to photochemistry with complementary models where photo-shielding is accounted for with locally computed prescriptions. With some exceptions, these local models for the radiative shielding length perform reasonably well at reproducing the distribution and amount of molecular gas as compared with a detailed, global ray tracing calculation. Specifically, an approach based on the Jeans Length with a T=40K temperature cap performs the best in regards to a number of different quantitative measures based on the H2 and CO abundances.
  • High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have $\approx 50-100\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$ line-of-sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly-compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds $\approx 35\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}},$ as occurs in the dense disks that have star formation rate densities above $\approx 0.1\,{\rm M}_\odot\,{\rm yr}^{-1}\,{\rm kpc}^{-2}.$ These outflows are triggered by a thermal runaway, arising from the inefficient cooling of hot material coupled with successive heating from turbulent driving. Thus, even in the absence of stellar feedback, a critical value of the star-formation rate density for outflow generation can arise due to a turbulent heating instability. This suggests that in strongly self-gravitating disks, outflows may be enhanced by, but need not caused by, energy input from supernovae.
  • Recent hydrodynamic (HD) simulations have shown that galactic disks evolve to reach well-defined statistical equilibrium states. The star formation rate (SFR) self-regulates until energy injection by star formation feedback balances dissipation and cooling in the interstellar medium (ISM), and provides vertical pressure support to balance gravity. In this paper, we extend our previous models to allow for a range of initial magnetic field strengths and configurations, utilizing three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We show that a quasi-steady equilibrium state is established as rapidly for MHD as for HD models unless the initial magnetic field is very strong or very weak, which requires more time to reach saturation. Remarkably, models with initial magnetic energy varying by two orders of magnitude approach the same asymptotic state. In the fully saturated state of the fiducial model, the integrated energy proportions E_kin:E_th:E_mag,t:E_mag,o are 0.35:0.39:0.15:0.11, while the proportions of midplane support P_turb:P_th:\Pi_mag,t:\Pi_mag,o are 0.49:0.18:0.18:0.15. Vertical profiles of total effective pressure satisfy vertical dynamical equilibrium with the total gas weight at all heights. We measure the "feedback yields" \eta_c=P_c/\Sigma_SFR (in suitable units) for each pressure component, finding that \eta_turb~4 and \eta_th~1 are the same for MHD as in previous HD simulations, and \eta_mag,t~1. These yields can be used to predict the equilibrium SFR for a local region in a galaxy based on its observed gas and stellar surface densities and velocity dispersions. As the ISM weight (or dynamical equilibrium pressure) is fixed, an increase in $\eta$ from turbulent magnetic fields reduces the predicted \Sigma_SFR by ~25% relative to the HD case.
  • We use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the quasi-equilibrium states of galactic disks regulated by star formation feedback. We incorporate effects from massive-star feedback via time-varying heating rates and supernova (SN) explosions. We find that the disks in our simulations rapidly approach a quasi-steady state that satisfies vertical dynamical equilibrium. The star formation rate (SFR) surface density self-adjusts to provide the total momentum flux (pressure) in the vertical direction that matches the weight of the gas. We quantify feedback efficiency by measuring feedback yields, \eta_c\equiv P_c/\Sigma_SFR (in suitable units), for each pressure component. The turbulent and thermal feedback yields are the same for HD and MHD simulations, \eta_th~1 and \eta_ turb~4, consistent with the theoretical expectations. In MHD simulations, turbulent magnetic fields are rapidly generated by turbulence, and saturate at a level corresponding to \eta_mag,t~1. The presence of magnetic fields enhances the total feedback yield and therefore reduces the SFR, since the same vertical support can be supplied at a smaller SFR. We suggest further numerical calibrations and observational tests in terms of the feedback yields.
  • In giant molecular clouds (GMCs), shocks driven by converging turbulent flows create high-density, strongly-magnetized regions that are locally sheetlike. In previous work, we showed that within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form by gathering material along the magnetic field lines. Here, we extend the parameter space of our three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations. We confirm the anisotropic core formation model we previously proposed, and quantify the dependence of median core properties on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that bound core properties are set by the total dynamic pressure (dominated by large-scale turbulence) and thermal sound speed c_s in GMCs, independent of magnetic field strength. For models with Mach number between 5 and 20, the median core masses and radii are comparable to the critical Bonnor-Ebert mass and radius defined using the dynamic pressure for P_ext. Our results correspond to M_core = 1.2 c_s^4/sqrt(G^3 rho_0 v_0^2) and R_core = 0.34 c_s^2/sqrt(G rho_0 v_0^2) for rho_0 and v_0 the large-scale mean density and velocity. For our parameter range, the median M_core ~ 0.1-1 M_sun, but a very high pressure cloud could have lower characteristic core mass. We find cores and filaments form simultaneously, and filament column densities are a factor ~2 greater than the surrounding cloud when cores first collapse. We also show that cores identified in our simulations have physical properties comparable to those observed in the Perseus cloud. Superthermal cores in our models are generally also magnetically supercritical, suggesting that the same may be true in observed clouds.
  • Radiation feedback from young star clusters embedded in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) is believed to be important to the control of star formation. For the most massive and dense clouds, including those in which super star clusters (SSCs) are born, pressure from reprocessed radiation exerted on dust grains may disperse a significant portion of the cloud mass back into the interstellar medium (ISM). Using our radiaton hydrodynamics (RHD) code, Hyperion, we conduct a series of numerical simulations to test this idea. Our models follow the evolution of self-gravitating, strongly turbulent clouds in which collapsing regions are replaced by radiating sink particles representing stellar clusters. We evaluate the dependence of the star formation efficiency (SFE) on the size and mass of the cloud and $\kappa$, the opacity of the gas to infrared (IR) radiation. We find that the single most important parameter determining the evolutionary outcome is $\kappa$, with $\kappa \gtrsim 15 \text{ cm}^2 \text{ g}^{-1}$ needed to disrupt clouds. For $\kappa = 20-40 \text{ cm}^2 \text{ g}^{-1}$, the resulting SFE=50-70% is similar to empirical estimates for some SSC-forming clouds. The opacities required for GMC disruption likely apply only in dust-enriched environments. We find that the subgrid model approach of boosting the direct radiation force $L/c$ by a "trapping factor" equal to a cloud's mean IR optical depth can overestimate the true radiation force by factors of $\sim 4-5$. We conclude that feedback from reprocessed IR radiation alone is unlikely to significantly reduce star formation within GMCs unless their dust abundances or cluster light-to-mass ratios are enhanced.
  • We investigate prestellar core formation and accretion based on three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Our simulations represent local $\sim 1$pc regions within giant molecular clouds where a supersonic turbulent flow converges, triggering star formation in the post-shock layer. We include turbulence and self-gravity, applying sink particle techniques, and explore a range of inflow Mach number ${\cal M}=2-16$. Two sets of cores are identified and compared: $t_1$-cores are identified of a time snapshot in each simulation, representing dense structures in a single cloud map; $t_\mathrm{coll}$-cores are identified at their individual time of collapse, representing the initial mass reservoir for accretion. We find that cores and filaments form and evolve at the same time. At the stage of core collapse, there is a well-defined, converged characteristic mass for isothermal fragmentation that is comparable to the critical Bonner-Ebert mass at the post-shock pressure. The core mass functions (CMFs) of $t_\mathrm{coll}$-cores show a deficit of high-mass cores ($\gtrsim 7M_\odot$) compared to the observed stellar initial mass function (IMF). However, the CMFs of $t_1$-cores are similar to the observed CMFs and include many low-mass cores that are gravitationally stable. The difference between $t_1$-cores and $t_\mathrm{coll}$-cores suggests that the full sample from observed CMFs may not evolve into protostars. Individual sink particles accrete at a roughly constant rate throughout the simulations, gaining one $t_\mathrm{coll}$-core mass per free-fall time even after the initial mass reservoir is accreted. High-mass sinks gain proportionally more mass at late times than low-mass sinks. There are outbursts in accretion rates, resulting from clumpy density structures falling into the sinks.
  • Supernova (SN) explosions deposit prodigious energy and momentum in their environments, with the former regulating multiphase thermal structure and the latter regulating turbulence and star formation rates in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, systematic studies quantifying the impact of SNe in realistic inhomogeneous ISM conditions have been lacking. Using three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the dependence of radial momentum injection on both physical conditions (considering a range of mean density n=0.1-100) and numerical parameters. Our inhomogeneous simulations adopt two-phase background states that result from thermal instability in atomic gas. Although the SNR morphology becomes highly complex for inhomogeneous backgrounds, the radial momentum injection is remarkably insensitive to environmental details. For our two-phase simulations, the final momentum produced by a single SN is given by 2.8*10^5 M_sun*km/s n^{-0.17}. This is only 5% less than the momentum injection for a homogeneous environment with the same mean density, and only 30% greater than the momentum at the time of shell formation. The maximum mass in hot gas is quite insensitive to environmental inhomogeneity. Strong magnetic fields alter the hot gas mass at very late times, but the momentum injection remains the same. Initial experiments with multiple spatially-correlated SNe show a momentum per event nearly as large as single-SN cases. We also present a full numerical parameter study to assess convergence requirements. For convergence in the momentum and other quantities, we find that the numerical resolution dx and the initial size of the SNR r_init must satisfy dx, r_init<r_sf/3, where the shell formation radius is given by r_sf = 30 pc n^{-0.46} for two-phase models (or 30% smaller for a homogeneous medium).
  • We use ALMA to derive the mass, length, and time scales associated with the nuclear starburst in NGC 253. This region forms ~2 M_sun/yr of stars and resembles other starbursts in scaling relations, with star formation consuming the gas reservoir 10 times faster than in galaxy disks. We present observations of CO, the high effective density transitions HCN(1-0), HCO+(1-0), CS(2-1), and their isotopologues. We identify ten clouds that appear as peaks in line emission and enhancements in the HCN-to-CO ratio. These clouds are massive (~10^7 M_sun) structures with sizes (~30 pc) similar to GMCs in other systems. Compared to disk galaxy GMCs, they show high line widths (~20-40 km/s) given their size, with implied Mach numbers ~90. The clouds also show high surface (~6,000 M_sun/pc^2) and volume densities (n_H2~2,000 cm^-3). Given these, self-gravity can explain the line widths. This short free fall time (~0.7 Myr) helps explain the more efficient star formation in NGC 253. We also consider the starburst region as a whole. The geometry is confused by the high inclination, but simple models support a non-axisymmetric, bar-like geometry with a compact, clumpy region of high gas density embedded in an extended CO distribution. Even for the whole region, the surface density still exceeds that of a disk galaxy GMC. The orbital time (~10 Myr), disk free fall time (<~ 3 Myr), and disk crossing time (<~ 3 Myr) are each much shorter than in a normal spiral galaxy disk. Some but not all aspects of the structure correspond to predictions from assuming vertical dynamical equilibrium or a marginally stable rotating disk. Finally, the CO-to-H2 conversion factor implied by our cloud calculations is approximately Galactic, contrasting with results showing a low value for the whole starburst region. The contrast provides resolved support for the idea of mixed molecular ISM phases in starburst galaxies.
  • We present observations of N2H+(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HCN(1-0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 square arcminutes of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of 7 arcsecs. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N2H+(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of 0.2 pc and widths of 0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.
  • We investigate the roles of magnetic fields and ambipolar diffusion during prestellar core formation in turbulent giant molecular clouds (GMCs), using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Our simulations focus on the shocked layer produced by a converging flow within a GMC, and survey varying ionization and angle between the upstream flow and magnetic field. We also include ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and hydrodynamic models. From our simulations, we identify hundreds of self-gravitating cores that form within 1 Myr, with masses M ~ 0.04 - 2.5 solar-mass and sizes L ~ 0.015 - 0.07 pc, consistent with observations of the peak of the core mass function (CMF). Median values are M = 0.47 solar-mass and L = 0.03 pc. Core masses and sizes do not depend on either the ionization or upstream magnetic field direction. In contrast, the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio does increase with lower ionization, from twice to four times the critical value. The higher mass-to-flux ratio for low ionization is the result of enhanced transient ambipolar diffusion when the shocked layer first forms. However, ambipolar diffusion is not necessary to form low-mass supercritical cores. For ideal MHD, we find similar masses to other cases. These masses are 1 - 2 orders of magnitude lower than the value that defines a magnetically supercritical sphere under post-shock ambient conditions. This discrepancy is the result of anisotropic contraction along field lines, which is clearly evident in both ideal MHD and diffusive simulations. We interpret our numerical findings using a simple scaling argument which suggests that gravitationally critical core masses will depend on the sound speed and mean turbulent pressure in a cloud, regardless of magnetic effects.
  • Giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are the primary reservoirs of cold, star-forming molecular gas in the Milky Way and similar galaxies, and thus any understanding of star formation must encompass a model for GMC formation, evolution, and destruction. These models are necessarily constrained by measurements of interstellar molecular and atomic gas, and the emergent, newborn stars. Both observations and theory have undergone great advances in recent years, the latter driven largely by improved numerical simulations, and the former by the advent of large-scale surveys with new telescopes and instruments. This chapter offers a thorough review of the current state of the field.
  • The under-abundance of very massive galaxies in the universe is frequently attributed to the effect of galactic winds. Although ionized galactic winds are readily observable most of the expelled mass is likely in cooler atomic and molecular phases. Expanding molecular shells observed in starburst systems such as NGC 253 and M 82 may facilitate the entrainment of molecular gas in the wind. While shell properties are well constrained, determining the amount of outflowing gas emerging from such shells and the connection between this gas and the ionized wind requires spatial resolution <100 pc coupled with sensitivity to a wide range of spatial scales, hitherto not available. Here we report observations of NGC 253, a nearby starburst galaxy (D~3.4 Mpc) known to possess a wind, which trace the cool molecular wind at 50 pc resolution. At this resolution the extraplanar molecular gas closely tracks the H{\alpha} filaments, and it appears connected to molecular expanding shells located in the starburst region. These observations allow us to directly measure the molecular outflow rate to be > 3 Msun/yr and likely ~9 Msun/yr. This implies a ratio of mass-outflow rate to star formation rate of at least {\eta}~1-3, establishing the importance of the starburst-driven wind in limiting the star formation activity and the final stellar content.
  • We describe a module for the Athena code that solves the gray equations of radiation hydrodynamics (RHD), based on the first two moments of the radiative transfer equation. We use a combination of explicit Godunov methods to advance the gas and radiation variables including the non-stiff source terms, and a local implicit method to integrate the stiff source terms. We adopt the M1 closure relation and include all leading source terms. We employ the reduced speed of light approximation (RSLA) with subcycling of the radiation variables in order to reduce computational costs. Our code is dimensionally unsplit in one, two, and three space dimensions and is parallelized using MPI. The streaming and diffusion limits are well-described by the M1 closure model, and our implementation shows excellent behavior for a problem with a concentrated radiation source containing both regimes simultaneously. Our operator-split method is ideally suited for problems with a slowly varying radiation field and dynamical gas flows, in which the effect of the RSLA is minimal. We present an analysis of the dispersion relation of RHD linear waves highlighting the conditions of applicability for the RSLA. To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we utilize a suite of radiation and RHD tests covering a broad range of regimes, including RHD waves, shocks, and equilibria, which show second-order convergence in most cases. As an application, we investigate radiation-driven ejection of a dusty, optically thick shell in the interstellar medium (ISM). Finally, we compare the timing of our method with other well-known iterative schemes for the RHD equations. Our code implementation, Hyperion, is suitable for a wide variety of astrophysical applications and will be made freely available on the Web.