• Calculations of synthetic spectropolarimetry are one means to test multi-dimensional explosion models for Type Ia supernovae. In a recent paper, we demonstrated that the violent merger of a 1.1 and 0.9 M$_{\odot}$ white dwarf binary system is too asymmetric to explain the low polarization levels commonly observed in normal Type Ia supernovae. Here, we present polarization simulations for two alternative scenarios: the sub-Chandrasekhar mass double-detonation and the Chandrasekhar mass delayed-detonation model. Specifically, we study a two-dimensional double-detonation model and a three-dimensional delayed-detonation model, and calculate polarization spectra for multiple observer orientations in both cases. We find modest polarization levels ($<$ 1 per cent) for both explosion models. Polarization in the continuum peaks at $\sim$ 0.1$-$0.3 per cent and decreases after maximum light, in excellent agreement with spectropolarimetric data of normal Type Ia supernovae. Higher degrees of polarization are found across individual spectral lines. In particular, the synthetic Si ii {\lambda}6355 profiles are polarized at levels that match remarkably well the values observed in normal Type Ia supernovae, while the low degrees of polarization predicted across the O i {\lambda}7774 region are consistent with the non-detection of this feature in current data. We conclude that our models can reproduce many of the characteristics of both flux and polarization spectra for well-studied Type Ia supernovae, such as SN 2001el and SN 2012fr. However, the two models considered here cannot account for the unusually high level of polarization observed in extreme cases such as SN 2004dt.
  • We investigate whether pure deflagration models of Chandrasekhar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf stars can account for one or more subclass of the observed population of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions. We compute a set of 3D full-star hydrodynamic explosion models, in which the deflagration strength is parametrized using the multispot ignition approach. For each model, we calculate detailed nucleosynthesis yields in a post-processing step with a 384 nuclide nuclear network. We also compute synthetic observables with our 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code for comparison with observations. For weak and intermediate deflagration strengths (energy release E_nuc <~ 1.1 x 10^51 erg), we find that the explosion leaves behind a bound remnant enriched with 3 to 10 per cent (by mass) of deflagration ashes. However, we do not obtain the large kick velocities recently reported in the literature. We find that weak deflagrations with E_nuc ~ 0.5 x 10^51 erg fit well both the light curves and spectra of 2002cx-like SNe Ia, and models with even lower explosion energies could explain some of the fainter members of this subclass. By comparing our synthetic observables with the properties of SNe Ia, we can exclude the brightest, most vigorously ignited models as candidates for any observed class of SN Ia: their B - V colours deviate significantly from both normal and 2002cx-like SNe Ia and they are too bright to be candidates for other subclasses.
  • In a companion paper, Seitenzahl et al. (2013) presented a set of three-dimensional delayed detonation models for thermonuclear explosions of near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs (WDs). Here, we present multi-dimensional radiative transfer simulations that provide synthetic light curves and spectra for those models. The model sequence explores both changes in the strength of the deflagration phase (controlled by the ignition configuration) and the WD central density. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the strength of the deflagration significantly affects the explosion and the observables. Variations in the central density also have an influence on both brightness and colour, but overall it is a secondary parameter in our set of models. In many respects, the models yield a good match to normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia): peak brightness, rise/decline time scales and synthetic spectra are all in reasonable agreement. There are, however, several differences. In particular, the models are too red around maximum light, manifest spectral line velocities that are a little too high and yield I-band light curves that do not match observations. Although some of these discrepancies may simply relate to approximations made in the modelling, some pose real challenges to the models. If viewed as a complete sequence, our models do not reproduce the observed light-curve width-luminosity relation (WLR) of SNe Ia: all our models show similar B-band decline rates, irrespective of peak brightness. This suggests that simple variations in the strength of the deflagration phase in Chandrasekhar-mass deflagration-to-detonation models do not readily explain the observed diversity of normal SNe Ia. This may imply that some other parameter within the Chandrasekhar-mass paradigm is key to the WLR, or that a substantial fraction of normal SNe Ia arise from an alternative explosion scenario.
  • A promising model for normal Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions are delayed detonations of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs, in which the burning starts out as a subsonic deflagration and turns at a later phase of the explosion into a supersonic detonation. The mechanism of the underlying deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) is unknown in detail, but necessary conditions have been determined recently. The region of detonation initiation cannot be spatially resolved in multi-dimensional full-star simulations of the explosion. We develop a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for DDTs in thermonuclear supernova simulations that is consistent with the currently known constraints. The probability for a DDT to occur is calculated from the distribution of turbulent velocities measured on the grid scale in the vicinity of the flame and the fractal flame surface area that satisfies further physical constraints, such as fuel fraction and fuel density. The implementation of our DDT criterion provides a solid basis for simulations of thermonuclear supernova explosions in the delayed detonation scenario. It accounts for the currently known necessary conditions for the transition and avoids the inclusion of resolution-dependent quantities in the model. The functionality of our DDT criterion is demonstrated on the example of one three-dimensional thermonuclear supernova explosion simulation.
  • Besides the fact that the gamma-ray emission due to radioactive decays is responsible for powering the light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), gamma rays themselves are of particular interest as a diagnostic tool because they provide a direct way to obtain deeper insights into the nucleosynthesis and the kinematics of these explosion events. Focusing on two of the most broadly discussed SN Ia progenitor scenarios - a delayed detonation in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) and a violent merger of two WDs - we use three-dimensional explosion models and perform radiative transfer simulations to obtain synthetic gamma-ray spectra. Both chosen models produce the same mass of 56Ni and have similar optical properties that are in reasonable agreement with the recently observed supernova SN 2011fe. In contrast to the optical regime, the gamma-ray emission of our two chosen models proves to be rather different. The almost direct connection of the emission of gamma rays to fundamental physical processes occuring in SNe Ia permits additional constraints concerning several explosion model properties that are not easily accessible within other wavelength ranges. Proposed future MeV missions such as GRIPS will resolve all spectral details only for nearby SNe Ia, but hardness ratio and light curve measurements still allow for a distinction of the two different models at 10 and 16 Mpc for an exposure time of 10^6 s, respectively. The possibility to detect the strongest line features up to the Virgo distance will offer the opportunity to build up a first sample of SN Ia detections in the gamma-ray energy range and underlines the importance of future space observatories for MeV gamma rays.
  • The nearby supernova SN 2011fe can be observed in unprecedented detail. Therefore, it is an important test case for Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) models, which may bring us closer to understanding the physical nature of these objects. Here, we explore how available and expected future observations of SN 2011fe can be used to constrain SN Ia explosion scenarios. We base our discussion on three-dimensional simulations of a delayed detonation in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf and of a violent merger of two white dwarfs-realizations of explosion models appropriate for two of the most widely-discussed progenitor channels that may give rise to SNe Ia. Although both models have their shortcomings in reproducing details of the early and near-maximum spectra of SN 2011fe obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory), the overall match with the observations is reasonable. The level of agreement is slightly better for the merger, in particular around maximum, but a clear preference for one model over the other is still not justified. Observations at late epochs, however, hold promise for discriminating the explosion scenarios in a straightforward way, as a nucleosynthesis effect leads to differences in the 55Co production. SN 2011fe is close enough to be followed sufficiently long to study this effect.
  • Delayed detonations of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs (WDs) have been very successful in explaining the spectra, light curves, and the width-luminosity relation of spectroscopically normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The ignition of the thermonuclear deflagration flame at the end of the convective carbon "simmering" phase in the core of the WD is still not well understood and much about the ignition kernel distribution remains unknown. Furthermore, the central density at the time of ignition depends on the still uncertain screened carbon fusion reaction rates, the accretion history and cooling time of the progenitor, and the composition. We present the results of twelve high-resolution three-dimensional delayed detonation SN Ia explosion simulations that employ a new criterion to trigger the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT). All simulations trigger our DDT criterion and the resulting delayed detonations unbind the star. We find a trend of increasing iron group element (IGE) production with increasing central density for bright, faint, and intermediate SNe. The total 56Ni yield, however, remains more or less constant, even though increased electron captures at high density result in a decreasing 56Ni mass fraction of the IGE material. We attribute this to an approximate balance of 56Ni producing and destroying effects. The deflagrations that were ignited at higher density initially have a faster growth rate of subgrid-scale turbulence. Hence, the effective flame speed increases faster, which triggers the DDT criterion earlier, at a time when the central density of the expanded star is higher. This leads to an overall increase of IGE production, which off-sets the percental reduction of 56Ni due to neutronization.
  • The delayed detonation model describes the observational properties of the majority of type Ia supernovae very well. Using numerical data from a three-dimensional deflagration model for type Ia supernovae, the intermittency of the turbulent velocity field and its implications on the probability of a deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) transition are investigated. From structure functions of the turbulent velocity fluctuations, we determine intermittency parameters based on the log-normal and the log-Poisson models. On the other hand, the analysis of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the vicinity of the flame front by Roepke suggests a much higher probability of large velocity fluctuations on the grid scale in comparison to the log-normal intermittency model. Following Pan et al., we computed probability density functions for a DDT for the different distributions. Assuming that a DDT can occur in the stirred flame regime, as proposed by Woosley et al., the log-normal model would imply a delayed detonation between 0.7 and 0.8 seconds after the beginning of the deflagration phase for the multi-spot ignition scenario used in the simulation. However, the probability drops to virtually zero if a DDT is further constrained by the requirement that the turbulent velocity fluctuations reach about 500 km/s. Under this condition, delayed detonations are only possible if the distribution of the velocity fluctuations is not log-normal. From our calculations follows that the distribution obtained by Roepke allow for multiple DDTs around 0.8 seconds after ignition at a transition density close to 1x10^7 g/cm^3.
  • We analyze the statistical properties of the turbulent velocity field in the deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae. In particular, we consider the question of whether turbulence is isotropic and consistent with the Kolmogorov theory at small length scales. Using numerical data from a high-resolution simulation of a thermonuclear supernova explosion, spectra of the turbulence energy and velocity structure functions are computed. We show that the turbulent velocity field is isotropic at small length scales and follows a scaling law that is consistent with the Kolmogorov theory until most of the nuclear fuel is burned. At length scales greater than a certain characteristic scale, turbulence becomes anisotropic. Here, the radial velocity fluctuations follow the scaling law of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, whereas the angular component still obeys Kolmogorov scaling. In the late phase of the explosion, this characteristic scale drops below the numerical resolution of the simulation. The analysis confirms that a subgrid-scale model for the unresolved turbulence energy is required for the consistent calculation of the flame speed in deflagration models of Type Ia supernovae, and that the assumption of isotropy on these scales is appropriate.