• We experimentally investigate the fluidization of a granular material subject to mechanical vibrations by monitoring the angular velocity of a vane suspended in the medium and driven by an external motor. On increasing the frequency we observe a re-entrant transition, as a jammed system first enters a fluidized state, where the vane rotates with high constant velocity, and then returns to a frictional state, where the vane velocity is much lower. While the fluidization frequency is material independent, the viscosity recovery frequency shows a clear dependence on the material, that we rationalize by relating this frequency to the balance between dissipative and inertial forces in the system. Molecular dynamics simulations well reproduce the experimental data, confirming the suggested theoretical picture.
  • According to the acoustic fluidization hypothesis, elastic waves at a characteristic frequency form inside seismic faults even in the absence of an external perturbation. These waves are able to generate a normal stress which contrasts the confining pressure and promotes failure. Here, we study the mechanisms responsible for this wave activation via numerical simulations of a granular fault model. We observe the particles belonging to the percolating backbone, which sustains the stress, to perform synchronized oscillations over ellipticlike trajectories in the fault plane. These oscillations occur at the characteristic frequency of acoustic fluidization. As the applied shear stress increases, these oscillations become perpendicular to the fault plane just before the system fails, opposing the confining pressure, consistently with the acoustic fluidization scenario. The same change of orientation can be induced by external perturbations at the acoustic fluidization frequency.
  • We study the storage and retrieval of phase-coded patterns as stable dynamical attractors in recurrent neural networks, for both an analog and a integrate-and-fire spiking model. The synaptic strength is determined by a learning rule based on spike-time-dependent plasticity, with an asymmetric time window depending on the relative timing between pre- and post-synaptic activity. We store multiple patterns and study the network capacity. For the analog model, we find that the network capacity scales linearly with the network size, and that both capacity and the oscillation frequency of the retrieval state depend on the asymmetry of the learning time window. In addition to fully-connected networks, we study sparse networks, where each neuron is connected only to a small number z << N of other neurons. Connections can be short range, between neighboring neurons placed on a regular lattice, or long range, between randomly chosen pairs of neurons. We find that a small fraction of long range connections is able to amplify the capacity of the network. This imply that a small-world-network topology is optimal, as a compromise between the cost of long range connections and the capacity increase. Also in the spiking integrate and fire model the crucial result of storing and retrieval of multiple phase-coded patterns is observed. The capacity of the fully-connected spiking network is investigated, together with the relation between oscillation frequency of retrieval state and window asymmetry.