• The idea to describe quantum systems within a hydrodynamic framework (quantum hydrodynamics, QHD) goes back to Madelung and Bohm. While such a description is formally exact for a single particle, more recently the concept has been applied to many-particle systems by Manfredi and Haas [Phys. Rev. B {\bf 64}, 075316 (2001)] and received high popularity in parts of the quantum plasma community. Thereby, often the applicability limits of these equations are ignored, giving rise to unphysical predictions. Here we demonstrate that modified QHD equations for plasmas can be derived from Thomas-Fermi theory including gradient corrections. This puts QHD on firm grounds. At the same time this derivation yields a different prefactor, $\gamma=(D-2/3D)$, in front of the quantum (Bohm) potential which depends on the system dimensionality $D$. Our approach allows one to identify the limitations of QHD and to outline systematic improvements.
  • Chenopodium album seedling emergence studies were conducted at nine European and two North American locations comparing local populations with a common population from Denmark. It is hypothesized that C. album seedling recruitment timing and magnitude have adapted to environmental and cropping system practices of a locality. Limitations in the habitat (filter 1) were reflected in local C. album population recruitment season length. Generally, the duration of seedling recruitment of both populations (local; DEN-COM) increased with decreasing latitude, north-to-south. In general, compared to the local population, DEN-COM recruitment at locations north of Denmark was longer and south of Denmark was shorter, and ended sooner. Generally, the local cropping system disturbances (CSD) period increased with decreasing latitude. The total duration of the CSD period was over twice as long in the south as that in the north. Recruitment at each locality possessed seasonal structure (time, number) consisting of 2-4 discrete seasonal cohorts. This may be an adaptive means by which C. album searches for, and exploits, recruitment opportunity just prior to, and after, predictable disturbances. The control of C. album seedling emergence is contained in the heteroblastic traits of its locally adapted seeds, and is stimulated by a complex interaction of light, heat, water, nitrate and oxygen signals inherent in the local environment. Our observations of complex recruitment patterns occurring at critical cropping times is strong evidence that C. album possesses a flexible and sensitive germination regulation system adaptable to opportunity in many different Eurasian and North American agricultural habitats.