• The supernova impostor SN 2010da located in the nearby galaxy NGC 300, later identified as a likely supergiant B[e] high-mass X-ray binary, was simultaneously observed by NuSTAR and XMM-Newton between 2016 December 16 and 20, over a total time span of 310 ks. We report the discovery of a strong periodic modulation in the X-ray flux with a pulse period of 31.6 s and a very rapid spin-up, and confirm therefore that the compact object is a neutron star. We find that the spin period is changing from 31.71 s to 31.54 s over that period, with a spin-up rate of -5.56 x 10-7 s s-1, likely the largest ever observed from an accreting neutron star. The spectrum is described by a power-law and a disk black-body model, leading to a 0.3-30 keV unabsorbed luminosity of 4.7 x 10^39 erg s-1. Applying our best-fit model successfully to the spectra of an XMM-Newton observation from 2010, suggests that the lower fluxes of NGC 300 ULX1 reported from observations around that time are caused by a large amount of absorption, while the intrinsic luminosity was similar as seen in 2016. A more constant luminosity level is also consistent with the long-term pulse period evolution approaching an equilibrium value asymptotically. We conclude that the source is another candidate for the new class of ultraluminous X-ray pulsars.
  • AX J0043-737 is a source in the ASCA catalogue, the nature of which is uncertain. It is most commonly classified as a Crab-like pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) following apparent detection of pulsations at ~ 87 ms from a single ASCA observation. A follow-up ASCA observation was not able to confirm this, and the X-ray detection of the source has not been reported since. With a dedicated XMM-Newton, observation, we studied the nature of the source. We ascertained the source position, searched for the most probable counterpart and studied the X-ray spectrum. We also analysed other archival observations with the source in the field of view to study its long-term variability. With the good position localisation capability of XMM-Newton, we identify the counterpart of the source as MQS J004241.66--734041.3, an AGN behind the SMC at a redshift of 0.95. The X-ray spectrum can be fitted with an absorbed power law with a photon-index of $\Gamma=1.7$ which is consistent with that expected from AGNs. By comparing the current XMM-Newton, observation with an archival XMM-Newton and two other ASCA observations of the source, we find signatures of long-term variability which is also a common phenomenon in AGNs. All of the above are consistent with AX J0043-737 being an AGN behind the SMC.
  • SXP 1062 is a Be X-ray binary located in the Small Magellanic Cloud. It hosts a long-period X-ray pulsar and is likely associated with the supernova remnant MCSNR J0127-7332. In this work we present a multi-wavelength view on SXP 1062 in different luminosity regimes. We consider monitoring campaigns in optical (OGLE survey) and X-ray (SWIFT telescope). During these campaigns a tight coincidence of X-ray and optical outbursts is observed. We interpret this as typical Type I outbursts as often detected in Be X-ray binaries at periastron passage of the neutron star. To study different X-ray luminosity regimes in depth, during the source quiescence we observed it with XMM-Newton while Chandra observations followed an X-ray outburst. Nearly simultaneously with Chandra observations in X-rays, in optical the RSS/SALT telescope obtained spectra of SXP 1062. On the basis of our multi-wavelength campaign we propose a simple scenario where the disc of the Be star is observed face-on, while the orbit of the neutron star is inclined with respect to the disc. According to the model of quasi-spherical settling accretion our estimation of the magnetic field of the pulsar in SXP 1062 does not require an extremely strong magnetic field at the present time.
  • We performed a search for eclipsing and dipping sources in the archive of the EXTraS project - a systematic characterization of the temporal behaviour of XMM-Newton point sources. We discovered dips in the X-ray light curve of 3XMM J004232.1+411314, which has been recently associated with the hard X-ray source dominating the emission of M31. A systematic analysis of XMM-Newton observations revealed 13 dips in 40 observations (total exposure time $\sim$0.8 Ms). Among them, four observations show two dips, separated by $\sim$4.01 hr. Dip depths and durations are variable. The dips occur only during low-luminosity states (L$_{0.2-12}<1\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$), while the source reaches L$_{0.2-12}\sim2.8\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$. We propose this system to be a new dipping Low-Mass X-ray Binary in M31 seen at high inclination (60$^{\circ}$-80$^{\circ}$), the observed dipping periodicity is the orbital period of the system. A blue HST source within the Chandra error circle is the most likely optical counterpart of the accretion disk. The high luminosity of the system makes it the most luminous dipper known to date.
  • We report on a detailed study of the spectral and temporal properties of the neutron star low mass X-ray binary SLX 1737-282, which is located only ~1degr away from Sgr A. The system is expected to have a short orbital period, even within the ultra-compact regime, given its persistent nature at low X-ray luminosities and the long duration thermonuclear burst that it has displayed. We have analysed a Suzaku (18 ks) observation and an XMM-Newton (39 ks) observation taken 7 years apart. We infer (0.5-10 keV) X-ray luminosities in the range 3-6 x10^35erg s-1, in agreement with previous findings. The spectra are well described by a relatively cool (kTbb = 0.5 keV) black body component plus a Comptonized emission component with {\Gamma} ~1.5-1.7. These values are consistent with the source being in a faint hard state, as confirmed by the ~ 20 per cent fractional root mean square amplitude of the fast variability (0.1 - 7 Hz) inferred from the XMM-Newton data. The electron temperature of the corona is >7 keV for the Suzaku observation, but it is measured to be as low as ~2 keV in the XMM-Newton data at higher flux. The latter is significantly lower than expected for systems in the hard state. We searched for X-ray pulsations and imposed an upper limit to their semi-amplitude of 2 per cent (0.001 - 7 Hz). Finally, we investigated the origin of the low frequency variability emission present in the XMM-Newton data and ruled out an absorption dip origin. This constraint the orbital inclination of the system to 65 degr unless the orbital period is longer than 11 hr (i.e. the length of the XMM-Newton observation).
  • Ultraluminous x-ray sources (ULXs) in nearby galaxies shine brighter than any X-ray source in our Galaxy. ULXs are usually modeled as stellar-mass black holes (BHs) accreting at very high rates or intermediate-mass BHs. We present observations showing that NGC5907 ULX is instead an x-ray accreting neutron star (NS) with a spin period evolving from 1.43~s in 2003 to 1.13~s in 2014. It has an isotropic peak luminosity of about 1000 times the Eddington limit for a NS at 17.1~Mpc. Standard accretion models fail to explain its luminosity, even assuming beamed emission, but a strong multipolar magnetic field can describe its properties. These findings suggest that other extreme ULXs (x-ray luminosity > 10^{41} erg/s) might harbor NSs.
  • The X-ray binary population of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) contains a large number of massive X-ray binaries and the recent survey of the SMC by XMM-Newton has resulted in almost 50 more tentative high mass X-ray binary candidates. Using probability parameters from Haberl & Sturm (2016) together with the optical spectra and timing in this work, we confirm six new massive X-ray binaries in the SMC. We also report two very probable binary periods; of 36.4d in XMM 1859 and of 72.2 d in XMM 2300. These Be X-ray binaries are likely part of the general SMC population which rarely undergoes an X-ray outburst.
  • NGC 7793 P13 is a variable (luminosity range ~100) ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) proposed to host a stellar-mass black hole of less than 15 M$_{\odot}$ in a binary system with orbital period of 64 d and a 18-23 M$_{\odot}$ B9Ia companion. Within the EXTraS project we discovered pulsations at a period of ~0.42 s in two XMM-Newton observations of NGC 7793 P13, during which the source was detected at $L_{\mathrm{X}}\sim2.1\times10^{39}$ and $5\times10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (0.3-10 keV band). These findings unambiguously demonstrate that the compact object in NGC 7793 P13 is a neutron star accreting at super-Eddington rates. While standard accretion models face difficulties accounting for the pulsar X-ray luminosity, the presence of a multipolar magnetic field with $B$ ~ few $\times$ 10$^{13}$ G close to the base of the accretion column appears to be in agreement with the properties of the system.
  • The EXTraS project to explore the X-ray Transient and variable Sky searches for coherent signals in the X-ray archival data of XMM-Newton. XMM-Newton performed more than 400 pointed observations in the region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We inspected the results of the EXTraS period search to systematically look for new X-ray pulsators in our neighbour galaxy. We analysed the XMM-Newton observations of two sources from the 3XMM catalogue which show significant signals for coherent pulsations. 3XMM J051259.8-682640 was detected as source with hard X-ray spectrum in two XMM-Newton observations, revealing a periodic modulation of the X-ray flux with 956~s. As optical counterpart we identify an early-type star with Halpha emission. The OGLE I-band light curve exhibits a regular pattern with three brightness dips which mark a period of ~1350 d. The X-ray spectrum of 3XMM J051034.6-670353 is dominated by a super-soft blackbody-like emission component (kT ~ 70 eV) which is modulated by nearly 100% with a period of ~1418 s. From GROND observations we suggest a star with r' = 20.9 mag as possible counterpart of the X-ray source. 3XMM J051259.8-682640 is confirmed as a new Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We discuss the long-term optical period as likely orbital period which would be the longest known from a high-mass X-ray binary. The spectral and temporal properties of the super-soft source 3XMM J051034.6-670353 are very similar to those of RX J0806.3+1527 and RX J1914.4+2456 suggesting that it belongs to the class of double-degenerate polars and is located in our Galaxy rather than in the LMC.
  • We present the second ROSAT all-sky survey source catalogue, hereafter referred to as the 2RXS catalogue. This is the second publicly released ROSAT catalogue of point-like sources obtained from the ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS) observations performed with the PSPC between June 1990 and August 1991, and is an extended and revised version of the bright and faint source catalogues. We used the latest version of the RASS processing to produce overlapping X-ray images of 6.4x6.4 degrees sky regions. To create a source catalogue, a likelihood-based detection algorithm was applied to these, which accounts for the PSF across the PSPC field of view. Improvements in the background determination compared to 1RXS were also implemented. We obtained about 135,000 X-ray detections in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band down to a likelihood threshold of 6.5. Our simulations show that the expected spurious content of the catalogue is a strong function of detection likelihood, and the full catalogue is expected to contain about 30% spurious detections. X-ray images and overlaid X-ray contour lines provide an additional user product to evaluate the detections visually, and we performed our own visual inspections to flag uncertain detections. Intra-day variability in the X-ray light curves was quantified based on the normalised excess variance and a maximum amplitude variability analysis. X-ray spectral fits were performed using three basic models, a power law, a thermal plasma emission model, and black-body emission. Thirty-two large extended regions with diffuse emission and embedded point sources were identified and excluded from the present analysis. The 2RXS catalogue provides the deepest and cleanest X-ray all-sky survey catalogue in advance of eROSITA.
  • Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) hosting a neutron star and an OB supergiant companion. We examine the available Swift data, as well as other new or archival/serendipitous data, on three sources: IGR J17407-2808, 2XMM J185114.3-000004, and IGR J18175-2419, whose X-ray characteristics qualify them as candidate SFXT, in order to explore their properties and test whether they are consistent with an SFXT nature. As IGR J17407-2808 and 2XMM J185114.3-000004 triggered the Burst Alert Telescope on board Swift, the Swift data allow us to provide their first arcsecond localisations, leading to an unequivocal identification of the source CXOU J174042.0-280724 as the soft X-ray counterpart of IGR J17407-2808, as well as their first broadband spectra, which can be fit with models generally describing accreting neutron stars in HMXBs. While still lacking optical spectroscopy to assess the spectral type of the companion, we propose 2XMM J185114.3-000004 as a very strong SFXT candidate. The nature of IGR J17407-2808 remains, instead, more uncertain. Its broad band properties cannot exclude that the emission originates from either a HMXB (and in that case, a SFXT) or, more likely, a low mass X-ray binary. Finally, based on the deep non-detection in our XRT monitoring campaign and a careful reanalysis of the original Integral data in which the discovery of the source was first reported, we show that IGR J18175-2419 is likely a spurious detection.
  • We report on the results of a $\sim$40 d multi-wavelength monitoring of the Be X-ray binary system IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55). During that period the system was monitored in the X-rays using the Swift telescope and in the optical with multiple instruments. When the X-ray luminosity exceeded $10^{36}$ erg/s we triggered an XMM-Newton ToO observation. Timing analysis of the photon events collected during the XMM-Newton observation reveals coherent X-ray pulsations with a period of 38.551(3) s (1 {\sigma}), making it the 17$^{th}$ known high-mass X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC. During the outburst, the X-ray spectrum is fitted best with a model composed of an absorbed power law ($\Gamma =0.63$) plus a high-temperature black-body (kT $\sim$ 2 keV) component. By analysing $\sim$12 yr of available OGLE optical data we derived a 30.776(5) d optical period, confirming the previously reported X-ray period of the system as its orbital period. During our X-ray monitoring the system showed limited optical variability while its IR flux varied in phase with the X-ray luminosity, which implies the presence of a disk-like component adding cooler light to the spectral energy distribution of the system.
  • We report on the identification of the new Galactic Center (GC) transient Swift J174540.7-290015 as a likely low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) located at only 16 arcsec from Sgr A*. This transient was detected on 2016 February 6th during the Swift GC monitoring, and it showed long-term spectral variations compatible with a hard to soft state transition. We observed the field with XMM-Newton on February 26th for 35 ks, detecting the source in the soft state, characterised by a low level of variability and a soft X-ray thermal spectrum with a high energy tail (detected by INTEGRAL up to ~50 keV), typical of either accreting neutron stars or black holes. We observed: i) a high column density of neutral absorbing material, suggesting that Swift J174540.7-290015 is located near or beyond the GC and; ii) a sub-Solar Iron abundance, therefore we argue that Iron is depleted into dust grains. The lack of detection of FeK absorption lines, eclipses or dipping suggests that the accretion disc is observed at a low inclination angle. Radio (VLA) observations did not detect any radio counterpart to Swift J174540.7-290015. No evidence for X-ray or radio periodicity is found. The location of the transient was observed also in the near-IR with GROND at MPG/ESO La Silla 2.2m telescope and VLT/NaCo pre- and post-outburst. Within the Chandra error region we find multiple objects that display no significant variations.
  • During a search for coherent signals in the X-ray archival data of XMM-Newton, we discovered a modulation at 1.2 s in 3XMM J004301.4+413017 (3X J0043), a source lying in the direction of an external arm of M 31. This short period indicates a neutron star (NS). Between 2000 and 2013, the position of 3X J0043 was imaged by public XMM-Newton observations 35 times. The analysis of these data allowed us to detect an orbital modulation at 1.27 d and study the long-term properties of the source. The emission of the pulsar was rather hard (most spectra are described by a power law with $\Gamma < 1$) and, assuming the distance to M 31, the 0.3-10 keV luminosity was variable, from $\sim$$3\times10^{37}$ to $2\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The analysis of optical data shows that, while 3X J0043 is likely associated to a globular cluster in M 31, a counterpart with $V\gtrsim22$ outside the cluster cannot be excluded. Considering our findings, there are two main viable scenarios for 3X J0043: a peculiar low-mass X-ray binary, similar to 4U 1822-37 or 4U 1626-67, or an intermediate-mass X-ray binary resembling Her X-1. Regardless of the exact nature of the system, 3X J0043 is the first accreting NS in M 31 in which the spin period has been detected.
  • We present a comprehensive X-ray study of the population of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the LMC. Using primarily XMM-Newton, we conduct a systematic spectral analysis of LMC SNRs to gain new insights on their evolution and the interplay with their host galaxy. We combined all the archival XMM observations of the LMC with those of our Very Large Programme survey. We produced X-ray images and spectra of 51 SNRs, out of a list of 59. Using a careful modelling of the background, we consistently analysed all the X-ray spectra and measure temperatures, luminosities, and chemical compositions. We investigated the spatial distribution of SNRs in the LMC and the connection with their environment, characterised by various SFHs. We tentatively typed all LMC SNRs to constrain the ratio of core-collapse to type Ia SN rates in the LMC. We compared the X-ray-derived column densities to HI maps to probe the three-dimensional structure of the LMC. This work provides the first homogeneous catalogue of X-ray spectral properties of LMC SNRs. It offers a complete census of LMC SNRs exhibiting Fe K lines (13% of the sample), or revealing contribution from hot SN ejecta (39%). Abundances in the LMC ISM are found to be 0.2-0.5 solar, with a lower [$\alpha$/Fe] than in the Milky Way. The ratio of CC/type Ia SN in the LMC is $N_{\mathrm{CC}}/N_{\mathrm{Ia}} = 1.35(_{-0.24}^{+0.11})$, lower than in local SN surveys and galaxy clusters. Comparison of X-ray luminosity functions of SNRs in Local Group galaxies reveals an intriguing excess of bright objects in the LMC. We confirm that 30 Doradus and the LMC Bar are offset from the main disc of the LMC, to the far and near sides, respectively. (abridged)
  • We present a study of the supernova remnant MCSNR J0512-6707 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We used new data from XMM-Newton to characterise the X-ray emission and data from the Australian Telescope Compact Array, the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey, and Spitzer to gain a picture of the environment into which the remnant is expanding. We performed a morphological study, determined radio polarisation and magnetic field orientation, and performed an X-ray spectral analysis. We estimated the its size to be 24.9 (\pm1.5) x 21.9 (\pm1.5) pc, with the major axis rotated ~29 deg east of north. Radio polarisation at 3 cm and 6 cm indicate a higher degree of polarisation in the NW and SE tangentially oriented to the SNR shock front, indicative of an SNR compressing the magnetic field threading the interstellar medium. The X-ray spectrum is unusual as it requires a soft (~0.2 keV) CIE thermal plasma of interstellar medium abundance, in addition to a harder component. Using our results and the Sedov dynamical model, we showed that this emission is not consistent with a Sedov remnant. We suggested that the thermal X-rays can be explained by MCSNR J0512-6707 having initially evolved into a wind-blown cavity and is now interacting with the surrounding dense shell. The origin of the hard component remains unclear. We could not determine the supernova type from the X-ray spectrum. Indirect evidence was found in the study of the local stellar population and star formation history in the literature, which suggests a core-collapse origin. MCSNR J0512-6707 likely resulted from the core-collapse of high mass progenitor which carved a low density cavity into its surrounding medium, with the soft X-rays resulting from the impact of the blast wave with the surrounding shell. The unusual hard X-ray component requires deeper and higher spatial resolution radio and X-ray observations to confirm its origin.
  • The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) will characterise the temporal behaviour of the largest ever sample of objects in the soft X-ray range (0.1-12 keV) with a complex, systematic and consistent analysis of all data collected by the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument onboard the ESA XMM-Newton X-ray observatory since its launch. We will search for, and characterize variability (both periodic and aperiodic) in hundreds of thousands of sources spanning more than nine orders of magnitude in time scale and six orders of magnitude in flux. We will also search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis. Our analysis will be completed by multiwavelength characterization of new discoveries and phenomenological classification of variable sources. All results and products will be made available to the community in a public archive, serving as a reference for a broad range of astrophysical investigations.
  • The deepest XMM-Newton mosaic map of the central 1.5 deg of the Galaxy is presented, including a total of about 1.5 Ms of EPIC-pn cleaned exposures in the central 15" and about 200 ks outside. This compendium presents broad-band X-ray continuum maps, soft X-ray intensity maps, a decomposition into spectral components and a comparison of the X-ray maps with emission at other wavelengths. Newly-discovered extended features, such as supernova remnants (SNRs), superbubbles and X-ray filaments are reported. We provide an atlas of extended features within +-1 degree of Sgr A*. We discover the presence of a coherent X-ray emitting region peaking around G0.1-0.1 and surrounded by the ring of cold, mid-IR-emitting material known from previous work as the "Radio Arc Bubble" and with the addition of the X-ray data now appears to be a candidate superbubble. Sgr A's bipolar lobes show sharp edges, suggesting that they could be the remnant, collimated by the circumnuclear disc, of a SN explosion that created the recently discovered magnetar, SGR J1745-2900. Soft X-ray features, most probably from SNRs, are observed to fill holes in the dust distribution, and to indicate a direct interaction between SN explosions and Galactic center (GC) molecular clouds. We also discover warm plasma at high Galactic latitude, showing a sharp edge to its distribution that correlates with the location of known radio/mid-IR features such as the "GC Lobe". These features might be associated with an inhomogeneous hot "atmosphere" over the GC, perhaps fed by continuous or episodic outflows of mass and energy from the GC region.
  • Aims. We present an X-ray study of the supernova remnant SNR J0533-7202 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and determine its physical characteristics based on its X-ray emission. Methods. We observed SNR J0533-7202 with XMM-Newton (flare-filtered exposure times of 18 ks EPIC-pn and 31 ks EPIC-MOS1/MOS2). We produced X-ray images of the SNR, performed an X-ray spectral analysis, and compared the results to multi-wavelength studies. Results. The distribution of X-ray emission is highly non-uniform, with the south-west region brighter than the north-east. The X-ray emission is correlated with the radio emission from the remnant. We determine that this morphology is likely due to the SNR expanding into a non-uniform ambient medium and not an absorption effect. We estimate the size to be 53.9 (\pm 3.4) x 43.6 (\pm 3.4) pc, with the major axis rotated ~64 degrees east of north. We find no spectral signatures of ejecta and infer that the X-ray plasma is dominated by swept-up interstellar medium. Using the spectral fit results and the Sedov self-similar solution, we estimate an age of ~17-27 kyr, with an initial explosion energy of (0.09-0.83) x 10^51 erg. We detected an X-ray source located near the centre of the remnant, namely XMMU J053348.2-720233. The source type could not be conclusively determined due to the lack of a multi-wavelength counterpart and low X-ray counts. We find that it is likely either a background active galactic nucleus or a low-mass X-ray binary in the LMC. Conclusions. We detected bright thermal X-ray emission from SNR J0533-7202 and determined that the remnant is in the Sedov phase of its evolution. The lack of ejecta emission prohibits us from typing the remnant with the X-ray data. Therefore, the likely Type Ia classification based on the local stellar population and star formation history reported in the literature cannot be improved upon.
  • The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) will harvest the hitherto unexplored temporal domain information buried in the serendipitous data collected by the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument onboard the ESA XMM-Newton X-ray observatory since its launch. This will include a search for fast transients, as well as a search and characterization of variability (both periodic and aperiodic) in hundreds of thousands of sources spanning more than nine orders of magnitude in time scale and six orders of magnitude in flux. X-ray results will be complemented by multiwavelength characterization of new discoveries. Phenomenological classification of variable sources will also be performed. All our results will be made available to the community. A didactic program in selected High Schools in Italy, Germany and the UK will also be implemented. The EXTraS project (2014-2016), funded within the EU/FP7 framework, is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany).
  • Aims: We present a study of the superbubble (SB) 30 Dor C and the newly identified MCSNR J0536-6913 in the LMC. Methods: All available XMM-Newton data (exposure times of 420 ks EPIC-pn, 556 ks EPIC-MOS1, 614 ks EPIC-MOS2) were used to characterise the thermal X-ray emission in the region. An analysis of the non-thermal X-rays is also presented and discussed in the context of emission mechanisms previously suggested in the literature. These data are supplemented by X-ray data from Chandra, optical data from the MCELS, and radio data from ATCA and MOST. Results: The brightest thermal emission was found to be associated with a new supernova remnant, MCSNR J0536-6913. X-ray spectral analysis of MCSNR J0536-6913 suggested an ejecta-dominated remnant with lines of O, Ne, Mg, and Si, and a total 0.3-10 keV luminosity of ~8E+34 erg/s. Based on derived ejecta abundance ratios, we determined the mass of the stellar progenitor to be either ~18 M_sun or as high as >40 M_sun, though the spectral fits were subject to assumptions (e.g., uniform temperature and well-mixed ejecta). The thermal emission from the SB exhibited enrichment by alpha-process elements, evidence for a recent core-collapse SNR interaction with the SB shell. We detected non-thermal X-ray emission throughout 30 Dor C, with the brightest regions being highly correlated with the H-alpha and radio shells. We created a non-thermal spectral energy distribution for the north-eastern shell of 30 Dor C which was best-fit with an exponentially cut-off synchrotron model. Conclusions: Thermal X-ray emission from 30 Dor C is very complex, consisting of a large scale SB emission at the eastern shell wall with the brightest emission due to MCSNR J0536-6913. The fact that the non-thermal spectral energy distribution of the SB shell was observed to roll-off is further evidence that the non-thermal X-rays from 30 Dor C are synchrotron in origin.
  • We identify a new candidate for a Be/X-ray binary in the XMM-Newton slew survey and archival Swift observations that is located in the transition region of the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Magellanic Bridge. We investigated and classified this source with follow-up XMM-Newton and optical observations. We model the X-ray spectra and search for periodicities and variability in the X-ray observations and the OGLE I-band light curve. The optical counterpart has been classified spectroscopically, with data obtained at the SAAO 1.9 m telescope, and photometrically, with data obtained using GROND at the MPG 2.2 m telescope. The X-ray spectrum is typical of a high-mass X-ray binary with an accreting neutron star. We detect X-ray pulsations, which reveal a neutron-star spin period of P = (264.516+-0.014) s. The source likely shows a persistent X-ray luminosity of a few 10^35 erg/s and in addition type-I outbursts that indicate an orbital period of ~146 d. A periodicity of 0.867 d, found in the optical light curve, can be explained by non-radial pulsations of the Be star. We identify the optical counterpart and classify it as a B1-2II-IVe star. This confirms SXP 265 as a new Be/X-ray binary pulsar originating in the tidal structure between the Magellanic Clouds.
  • We present new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) radio-continuum and XMM-Newton/Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observations of the unusual supernova remnant HFPK 334 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The remnant follows a shell type morphology in the radio-continuum and has a size of $\sim$20~pc at the SMC distance. The X-ray morphology is similar, however, we detect a prominent point source close to the center of the SNR exhibiting a spectrum with a best fit powerlaw with a photon index of $\Gamma = 2.7 \pm 0.5$. This central point source is most likely a background object and cannot be directly associated with the remnant. The high temperature, nonequilibrium conditions in the diffuse region suggest that this gas has been recently shocked and point toward a younger SNR with an age of $\lesssim 1800$ years. With an average radio spectral index of $\alpha=-0.59\pm0.09$ we find that an equipartition magnetic field for the remnant is $\sim$90~$\mu$G, a value typical of younger SNRs in low-density environments. Also, we report detection of scattered radio polarisation across the remnant at 20~cm, with a peak fractional polarisation level of 25$\pm$5\%.
  • We present a detailed study of new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and XMM-Newton observations of LHA 120-N 70 (hereafter N 70), a spherically shaped object in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) classified as a superbubble (SB). Both archival and new observations were used to produce high quality radio-continuum, X-ray and optical images. The radio spectral index of N 70 is estimated to be $\alpha=-0.12\pm 0.06$ indicating that while a supernova or supernovae have occurred in the region at some time in the distant past, N70 is not the remnant of a single specific supernova. N70 exhibits limited polarisation with a maximum fractional polarisation of 9% in a small area of the north west limb. We estimate the size of N 70 to have a diameter of 104 pc ($\pm 1$ pc). The morphology of N 70 in X-rays closely follows that in radio and optical, with most X-ray emission confined within the bright shell seen at longer wavelengths. Purely thermal models adequately fit the soft X-ray spectrum which lacks harder emission (above 1 keV). We also examine the pressure output of N 70 where the values for the hot (PX) and warm (PHii) phase are consistent with other studied Hii regions. However, the dust-processed radiation pressure (PIR) is significantly smaller than in any other object studied in Lopez et al. (2013). N70 is a very complex region that is likely to have had multiple factors contributing to both the origin and evolution of the entire region.
  • [Abridged] Classical novae (CNe) represent the major class of supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs) in the central region of our neighbouring galaxy M31. We performed a dedicated monitoring of the M31 central region, aimed to detect SSS counterparts of CNe, with XMM-Newton and Chandra between Nov and Mar of the years 2009/10, 2010/11 and 2011/12. In total we detected 24 novae in X-rays. Seven of these sources were known from previous observations, including the M31 nova with the longest SSS phase, M31N~1996-08b, which was found to fade below our X-ray detection limit 13.8 yr after outburst. Of the new discoveries several novae exhibit significant variability in their short-term X-ray light curves with one object showing a suspected period of about 1.3 h. We studied the SSS state of the most recent outburst of a recurrent nova which had previously shown the shortest time ever observed between two outbursts (about 5 yr). The total number of M31 novae with X-ray counterpart was increased to 79 and we subjected this extended catalogue to detailed statistical studies. Four previously indicated correlations between optical and X-ray parameters could be confirmed and improved. We found indications that the multi-dimensional parameter space of nova properties might be dominated by a single physical parameter. We discuss evidence for a different X-ray behaviour of novae in the M31 bulge and disk. Exploration of the multi-wavelength parameter space of optical and X-ray measurements is shown to be a powerful tool for examining properties of extragalactic nova populations. While there are hints that the different stellar populations of M31 (bulge vs disk) produce dissimilar nova outbursts, there is also growing evidence that the overall behaviour of an average nova might be understood in surprisingly simple terms.