• Ocean flows are routinely inferred from low-resolution satellite altimetry measurements of sea surface height assuming a geostrophic balance. Recent nonlinear dynamical systems techniques have revealed that surface currents derived from altimetry can support mesoscale eddies with material boundaries that do not filament for many months, thereby representing effective transport mechanisms. However, the long-range Lagrangian coherence assessed for mesoscale eddy boundaries detected from altimetry is constrained by the impossibility of current altimeters to resolve ageostrophic submesoscale motions. These may act to prevent Lagrangian coherence from manifesting in the rigorous form described by the nonlinear dynamical systems theories. Here we use a combination of satellite ocean color and surface drifter trajectory data, rarely available simultaneously over an extended period of time, to provide observational evidence for the enduring Lagrangian coherence of a Loop Current ring detected from altimetry. We also seek indications of this behavior in the flow produced by a data-assimilative system which demonstrated ability to reproduce observed relative dispersion statistics down into the marginally submesoscale range. However, the simulated flow, total surface and subsurface or subsampled emulating altimetry, is not found to support the long-lasting Lagrangian coherence that characterizes the observed ring. This highlights the importance of the Lagrangian metrics produced by the nonlinear dynamical systems tools employed here in assessing model performance.
  • Persistent Lagrangian transport patterns at the ocean surface are revealed from Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) computed from daily climatological surface current velocities in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (NWGoM). The velocities are produced by a submesoscale permitting regional ocean model of the Gulf of Mexico. The significance of the climatological LCSs (cLCSs) is supported with ensemble-mean drifter density evolutions from simulated and historical satellite-tracked drifter trajectories. A persistent attracting barrier between the NWGoM shelf and the deep ocean is effectively identified by a hook-like pattern associated with groups of overall strongly attracting cLCSs that extend along the shelf break. Localized reductions in the attraction rate along these overall strongly attracting cLCSs proximal to cross-shore oriented cLCSs identify a pathway for potential transport across the shelf break. Groups of overall weakly-attracting cLCSs are not seen to strongly constrain material transport. Tracers originating over the shelf tend to be trapped there by the hook-like pattern as they spread cyclonically. Tracers originating beyond the shelf tend to be initially attracted to the hook-like pattern as they spread anti-cyclonically and eventually over the deep ocean. The findings have important implications for the mitigation of contaminant accidents such as oil spills.
  • Pair-separation statistics of in-situ and synthetic surface drifters deployed near the \emph{Deepwater Horizon} site in the Gulf of Mexico are investigated. The synthetic trajectories derive from a 1-km-resolution data-assimilative Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) simulation. The in-situ drifters were launched in the Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD). Diverse measures of the dispersion are calculated and compared to theoretical predictions. For the NCOM pairs, the measures indicate nonlocal pair dispersion at the smallest sampled scales. At separations exceeding 100 km, pair motion is uncorrelated, indicating absolute rather than relative dispersion. With the GLAD drifters however the statistics suggest local dispersion (in which pair separations exhibit power law growth), in line with previous findings. The disagreement stems in part from inertial oscillations, which affect the energy levels at small scales without greatly altering the net particle displacements. They were significant in GLAD but much weaker in the NCOM simulations. In addition the GLAD drifters were launched close together, producing few independent realizations and hence weaker statistical significance. Restricting the NCOM set to those launched at the same locations yields very similar statistics.
  • We document the long-term evolution of an Agulhas ring detected from satellite altimetry using a technique from nonlinear dynamical systems that enables objective (i.e., observer-independent) eddy framing. Such objectively detected eddies have Lagrangian (material) boundaries that remain coherent (unfilamented) over the detection period. The ring preserves a quite compact material entity for a period of about 2 years even after most initial coherence is lost within 5 months after detection. We attribute this to the successive development of short-term coherent material boundaries around the ring. These boundaries provide effective short-term shielding for the ring, which prevents a large fraction of the ring's interior from being mixed with the ambient turbulent flow. We show that such coherence regain events cannot be inferred from Eulerian analysis. This process is terminated by a ring-splitting event which marks the ring demise, near the South American coast. The genesis of the ring is characterized by a ring-merging event away from the Agulhas retroflection, followed by a 4-month-long partial coherence stage, scenario that is quite different than a simple current occlusion and subsequent eddy pinch off.
  • The role of mesoscale eddies in transporting Agulhas leakage is investigated using a recent technique from nonlinear dynamical systems theory applied on geostrophic currents inferred from the over two-decade-long satellite altimetry record. Eddies are found to acquire material coherence away from the Agulhas retroflection, near the Walvis Ridge in the South Atlantic. Yearly, 1 to 4 coherent material eddies are detected with diameters ranging from 40 to 280 km. A total of 23 eddy cores of about 50 km in diameter and with at least 30\pct of their contents traceable into the Indian Ocean were found to travel across the subtropical gyre with minor filamentation. Only 1 eddy core was found to pour its contents on the North Brazil Current. While ability of eddies to carry Agulhas leakage northwestward across the South Atlantic is supported by our analysis, this is more restricted than suggested by earlier ring transport assessments.
  • In Haller and Beron-Vera (2013) we developed a variational principle for the detection of coherent Lagrangian vortex boundaries. The solutions of this variational principle turn out to be closed null-geodesics of the Lorentzian metric associated with a generalized Green-Lagrange strain tensor family. This metric interpretation implies a mathematical analogy between coherent Lagrangian vortex boundaries and photon spheres in general relativity. Here we give an improved discussion on this analogy.
  • We introduce a simple variational principle for coherent material vortices in two-dimensional turbulence. Vortex boundaries are sought as closed stationary curves of the averaged Lagrangian strain. Solutions to this problem turn out to be mathematically equivalent to photon spheres around black holes in cosmology. The fluidic photon spheres satisfy explicit differential equations whose outermost limit cycles are optimal Lagrangian vortex boundaries. As an application, we uncover super-coherent material eddies in the South Atlantic, which yield specific Lagrangian transport estimates for Agulhas rings.
  • Several theories have been proposed to explain the development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) produced by the toxic dinoflagellate \emph{Karenia brevis} on the West Florida Shelf. However, because the early stages of HAB development are usually not detected, these theories have been so far very difficult to verify. In this paper we employ simulated \emph{Lagrangian coherent structures} (LCSs) to trace the early location of a HAB in late 2004 before it was transported to an area where it could be detected by satellite imagery, and then we make use of a population dynamics model to infer the factors that may have led to its development. The LCSs, which are computed based on a surface flow description provided by an ocean circulation model, delineate past and future histories of boundaries of passively advected fluid domains. The population dynamics model determines nitrogen in two components, nutrients and phytoplankton, which are assumed to be passively advected by the simulated surface currents. Two nearshore nutrient sources are identified for the HAB whose evolution is found to be strongly tied to the simulated LCSs. While one nutrient source can be associated with a coastal upwelling event, the other is seen to be produced by river runoff, which provides support to a theory of HAB development that considers nutrient loading into coastal waters produced by human activities as a critical element. Our results show that the use of simulated LCSs and a population dynamics model can greatly enhance our understanding of the early stages of the development of HABs.
  • Analysis of drifter trajectories in the Gulf of Mexico has revealed the existence of a region on the southern portion of the West Florida Shelf (WFS) that is not visited by drifters that are released outside of the region. This so-called ``forbidden zone'' (FZ) suggests the existence of a persistent cross-shelf transport barrier on the southern portion of the WFS. In this letter a year-long record of surface currents produced by a Hybrid-Coordinate Ocean Model simulation of the WFS is used to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs), which reveal the presence of a robust and persistent cross-shelf transport barrier in approximately the same location as the boundary of the FZ. The location of the cross-shelf transport barrier undergoes a seasonal oscillation, being closer to the coast in the summer than in the winter. A month-long record of surface currents inferred from high-frequency (HF) radar measurements in a roughly 60 km $\times$ 80 km region on the WFS off Tampa Bay is also used to identify LCSs, which reveal the presence of robust transient transport barriers. While the HF-radar-derived transport barriers cannot be unambiguously linked to the boundary of the FZ, this analysis does demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring transport barriers on the WFS using a HF-radar-based measurement system. The implications of a persistent cross-shelf transport barrier on the WFS for the development of harmful algal blooms on the shoreward side of the barrier are considered.
  • The relative importance of Lagrangian and population dynamics on spatial pattern formation in the distribution of plankton near the ocean's surface is investigated. Phytoplankton and zooplankton are treated as biologically interacting tracers that are passively advected by a divergence-free two-dimensional nonsteady velocity field. The time-dependence of this field is assumed to be quasiperiodic, which extends the analysis presented beyond standard chaotic advection. Various forms of predator--prey interactions, including complex interactions, are considered. Numerical simulations illustrate how Lagrangian dynamics, which is characterized by a mixed phase space with coexisting regular and chaotic motion regions, influences plankton patchiness generation depending on the nature of the biological interactions.
  • The Lagrangian dynamics of zonal jets in the atmosphere are considered, with particular attention paid to explaining why, under commonly encountered conditions, zonal jets serve as barriers to meridional transport. The velocity field is assumed to be two-dimensional and incompressible, and composed of a steady zonal flow with an isolated maximum (a zonal jet) on which two or more travelling Rossby waves are superimposed. The associated Lagrangian motion is studied with the aid of KAM (Kolmogorov--Arnold--Moser) theory, including nontrivial extensions of well-known results. These extensions include applicability of the theory when the usual statements of nondegeneracy are violated, and applicability of the theory to multiply periodic systems, including the absence of Arnold diffusion in such systems. These results, together with numerical simulations based on a model system, provide an explanation of the mechanism by which zonal jets serve as barriers to meridional transport of passive tracers under commonly encountered conditions. Causes for the breakdown of such a barrier are discussed. It is argued that a barrier of this type accounts for the sharp boundary of the Antarctic ozone hole at the perimeter of the stratospheric polar vortex in the austral spring.
  • It has been recently argued that near-integrable nonautonomous one-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems are constrained by KAM theory even when the time-dependent (nonintegrable) part of the Hamiltonian is given in the form of a superposition of time-periodic functions with incommensurate frequencies. Furthermore, such systems are constrained by one fewer integral of motion than is required to render the system completely integrable. As a consequence, the phase space in systems of this type is expected to be partitioned into nonintersecting regular and chaotic regions. In this note we provide numerical evidence of the existence of such a characteristic mixed phase space structure. This is done by considering the problem of acoustic ray dynamics in deep ocean environments, which is naturally described as a nonautonomous one-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian system with a multiply periodic Hamiltonian in the independent (time-like) variable. Also, we discuss the implications of a mixed phase space for the dynamics of that geophysical system and another one which describes Lagrangian motion in the ocean. The latter is also naturally described as a nonautonomous one-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian system with a multiply time-periodic Hamiltonian.
  • We consider a multilayer generalization of Ripa's inhomogeneous-density single-layer primitive-equation model. In addition to vary arbitrarily in horizontal position and time, the horizontal velocity and buoyancy fields are allowed to vary linearly with depth within each layer of the model. Preliminary results on linear waves and baroclinic instability suggest that a configuration involving a few layers may set the basis for a quite accurate and numerically efficient ocean model.
  • Sound propagation is considered in range-independent environments and environments consisting of a range-independent background on which a weak range-dependent perturbation is superimposed. Recent work on propagation of both types of environment, involving both ray- and mode-based wavefield descriptions, have focused on the importance of $\alpha $, a ray-based ``stability parameter,'' and $\beta ,$ a mode-based ``waveguide invariant.'' It is shown that, when $\beta $ is evaluated using asymptotic mode theory, $% \beta =\alpha .$ Using both ray and mode concepts, known results relating to the manner by which $\alpha $ (or $\beta $) controls both the unperturbed wavefield structure and the stability of the perturbed wavefield are briefly reviewed.
  • The general equations of motion for ocean dynamics are presented and the waves supported by the (inviscid, unforced) linearized system with respect to a state of rest are derived. The linearized dynamics sustains one zero frequency mode (called buoyancy mode) in which salinity and temperature rearrange in such a way that seawater density does not change. Five nonzero frequency modes (two acoustic modes, two inertia--gravity or Poincar\'{e} modes, and one planetary or Rossby mode) are also sustained by the linearized dynamics, which satisfy an asymptotic general dispersion relation. The most usual approximations made in physical oceanography (namely incompressibility, Boussinesq, hydrostatic, and quasigeostrophic) are also consider, and their implications in the reduction of degrees of freedom (number of independent dynamical fields or prognostic equations) of, and compatible waves with, the linearized governing equations are particularly discussed and emphasized.
  • The purpose of this paper is to present a multilayer primitive equations model for ocean dynamics in which the velocity and buoyancy fields within each layer are not only allowed to vary arbitrarily with horizontal position and time, but also with depth--linearly at most. The model is a generalization of Ripa's inhomogeneous one-layer model to an arbitrary number of layers. Unlike models with homogeneous layers, the present model is able to represent thermodynamics processes. Unlike models with slab layers, i.e. those in which the layer velocity and buoyancy fields are depth-independent, the present model can represent explicitly the thermal-wind balance within each layer which dominates at low frequency. In the absence of external forcing and dissipation, energy, volume, mass, and buoyancy variance constrain the dynamics; conservation of total zonal momentum requires in addition the usual zonal symmetry of the topography and horizontal domain. The model further possesses a singular Hamiltonian structure. Unlike the single-layer counterpart, however, no steady solution has been possible to prove formally (or Arnold) stable using the above invariants. It is shown here that a model with only two layers provides an excellent representation of the exact gravest baroclinic mode phase speed. This suggests that configurations with only a small number of layers will be needed to tackle a large variety of problems with enough realism.
  • Salmon's nearly geostrophic model for rotating shallow-water flow is derived in full spherical geometry. The model, which results upon constraining the velocity field to the height field in Hamilton's principle for rotating shallow-water dynamics, constitutes an important prototype of Hamiltonian balanced models. Instead of Salmon's original approach, which consists in taking variations of particle paths at fixed Lagrangian labels and time, Holm's approach is considered here, namely variations are taken on Lagrangian particle labels at fixed Eulerian positions and time. Unlike the classical quasigeostrophic model, Salmon's is found to be sensitive to the differences between geographic and geodesic coordinates. One consequence of this result is that the $\beta $ plane approximation, which is included in Salmon's original derivation, is not consistent for this class of model.
  • In this paper we extend earlier results regarding the effects of the lower layer of the ocean (below the thermocline) on the baroclinic instability within the upper layer (above the thermocline). We confront quasigeostrophic baroclinic instability properties of a 2.5-layer model with those of a 3-layer model with a very thick deep layer, which has been shown to predict spectral instability for basic state parameters for which the 2.5-layer model predicts nonlinear stability. We compute and compare maximum normal-mode perturbation growth rates, as well as rigorous upper bounds on the nonlinear growth of perturbations to unstable basic states, paying particular attention to the region of basic state parameters where the stability properties of the 2.5- and 3-layer model differ substantially. We found that normal-mode perturbation growth rates in the 3-layer model tend to maximize in this region. We also found that the size of state space available for eddy-amplitude growth tends to minimize in this same region. Moreover, we found that for a large spread of parameter values in this region the latter size reduces to only a small fraction of the total enstrophy of the system, thereby allowing us to make assessments of the significance of the instabilities.
  • Travel time stability is investigated in environments consisting of a range-independent background sound-speed profile on which a highly structured range-dependent perturbation is superimposed. The stability of both unconstrained and constrained (eigenray) travel times are considered. Both general theoretical arguments and analytical estimates of time spreads suggest that travel time stability is largely controlled by a property $\omega ^{\prime}$ of the background sound speed profile. Here, $2\pi/\omega (I)$ is the range of a ray double loop and $I$ is the ray action variable. Numerical results for both volume scattering by internal waves in deep ocean environments and rough surface scattering in upward refracting environments are shown to confirm the expectation that travel time stability is largely controlled by $\omega ^{\prime}$.