• We present observational data for a peculiar supernova discovered by the OGLE-IV survey and followed by the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey for Transient Objects. The inferred redshift of $z=0.07$ implies an absolute magnitude in the rest-frame $I$-band of M$_{I}\sim-17.6$ mag. This places it in the luminosity range between normal Type Ia SNe and novae. Optical and near infrared spectroscopy reveal mostly Ti and Ca lines, and an unusually red color arising from strong depression of flux at rest wavelengths $<5000$ \AA. To date, this is the only reported SN showing Ti-dominated spectra. The data are broadly consistent with existing models for the pure detonation of a helium shell around a low-mass CO white dwarf and "double-detonation" models that include a secondary detonation of a CO core following a primary detonation in an overlying helium shell.
  • In a companion paper, Seitenzahl et al. (2013) presented a set of three-dimensional delayed detonation models for thermonuclear explosions of near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs (WDs). Here, we present multi-dimensional radiative transfer simulations that provide synthetic light curves and spectra for those models. The model sequence explores both changes in the strength of the deflagration phase (controlled by the ignition configuration) and the WD central density. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the strength of the deflagration significantly affects the explosion and the observables. Variations in the central density also have an influence on both brightness and colour, but overall it is a secondary parameter in our set of models. In many respects, the models yield a good match to normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia): peak brightness, rise/decline time scales and synthetic spectra are all in reasonable agreement. There are, however, several differences. In particular, the models are too red around maximum light, manifest spectral line velocities that are a little too high and yield I-band light curves that do not match observations. Although some of these discrepancies may simply relate to approximations made in the modelling, some pose real challenges to the models. If viewed as a complete sequence, our models do not reproduce the observed light-curve width-luminosity relation (WLR) of SNe Ia: all our models show similar B-band decline rates, irrespective of peak brightness. This suggests that simple variations in the strength of the deflagration phase in Chandrasekhar-mass deflagration-to-detonation models do not readily explain the observed diversity of normal SNe Ia. This may imply that some other parameter within the Chandrasekhar-mass paradigm is key to the WLR, or that a substantial fraction of normal SNe Ia arise from an alternative explosion scenario.
  • Motivated by the fact that calibrated light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have become a major tool to determine the expansion history of the Universe, considerable attention has been given to, both, observations and models of these events over the past 15 years. Here, we summarize new observational constraints, address recent progress in modeling Type Ia supernovae by means of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, and discuss several of the still open questions. It will be be shown that the new models have considerable predictive power which allows us to study observable properties such as light curves and spectra without adjustable non-physical parameters. This is a necessary requisite to improve our understanding of the explosion mechanism and to settle the question of the applicability of SNe Ia as distance indicators for cosmology. We explore the capabilities of the models by comparing them with observations and we show how such models can be applied to study the origin of the diversity of SNe Ia.
  • The recent discovery of a very bright type Ia supernova, SNLS-03D3bb ($\equiv$ SN 2003fg), in the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) has raised the question of whether super-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf stars are needed to explain such explosions. In principle, such a progenitor could form by the mergers of two rather massive white dwarfs. Binary systems of two white dwarfs in close orbit where their total mass significantly exceeds the Chandrasekhar mass, have not yet been found. Therefore SNLS-03D3bb could establish the first clear case of a double-degenerate progenitor of a (peculiar) type Ia supernovae. Moreover, if this interpretation is correct, it casts some doubt on the universality of the calibration relations used to make SNe Ia distance indicators for cosmology. Here we present a critical discussion of the expected observational finger prints of super-Chandrasekhar-mass explosions; in important respects, these are not consistent with the observations of SNLS-03D3bb. We demonstrate that the lop-sided explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf could provide a better explanation.