• Utilizing the all-sky imaging capabilities of the LWA1 radio telescope along with a host of all-sky optical cameras, we have now observed 44 optical meteor counterparts to radio afterglows. Combining these observations we have determined the geographic positions of all 44 afterglows. Comparing the number of radio detections as a function of altitude above sea level to the number of expected bright meteors we find a strong altitudinal dependence characterized by a cutoff below $\sim$ 90 km, below which no radio emission occurs, despite the fact that many of the observed optical meteors penetrated well below this altitude. This cutoff suggests that wave damping from electron collisions is an important factor for the evolution of radio afterglows, which agrees with the hypothesis that the emission is the result of electron plasma wave emission.
  • We present a large survey of giant pulses from the Crab Pulsar as observed with the first station of the Long Wavelength Array. Automated methods for detecting giant pulses at low frequencies where scattering becomes prevalent are also explored. More than 1400 pulses were detected across four frequency bands between 20 - 84 MHz over a seven month period beginning in 2013, with additional followup observations in late 2014 and early 2015. A handful of these pulses were detected simultaneously across all four frequency bands. We examine pulse characteristics, including pulse broadening and power law indices for amplitude distributions. We find that the flux density increases toward shorter wavelengths, consistent with a spectral turnover at 100 MHz. Our observations uniquely span multiple scattering epochs, manifesting as a notable trend in the number of detections per observation. These results are characteristic of the variable interface between the synchrotron nebula and the surrounding interstellar medium.
  • Over the past few years, several occasions of large, continuous rotations of the electric vector position angle (EVPA) of linearly polarized optical emission from blazars have been reported. These events are often coincident with high energy gamma-ray flares and they have attracted considerable attention, as they could allow one to probe the magnetic field structure in the gamma-ray emitting region of the jet. The flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C279 is one of the most prominent examples showing this behaviour. Our goal is to study the observed EVPA rotations and to distinguish between a stochastic and a deterministic origin of the polarization variability. We have combined multiple data sets of R-band photometry and optical polarimetry measurements of 3C279, yielding exceptionally well-sampled flux density and polarization curves that cover a period of 2008-2012. Several large EVPA rotations are identified in the data. We introduce a quantitative measure for the EVPA curve smoothness, which is then used to test a set of simple random walk polarization variability models against the data. 3C279 shows different polarization variation characteristics during an optical low-flux state and a flaring state. The polarization variation during the flaring state, especially the smooth approx. 360 degrees rotation of the EVPA in mid-2011, is not consistent with the tested stochastic processes. We conclude that during the two different optical flux states, two different processes govern the polarization variation, possibly a stochastic process during the low-brightness state and a deterministic process during the flaring activity.
  • We present initial pulsar results from the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1) obtained during the commissioning period of LWA1 and early science results. We present detections of periodic emission from 44 previously known pulsars, including 3 millisecond pulsars (MSPs). The effects of the interstellar medium on pulsar emission are significantly enhanced at the low frequencies of the LWA1 band (10--88 MHz), making LWA1 a very sensitive instrument for characterizing changes in dispersion measures (DM) and other effects from the interstellar medium. Pulsars also often have significant evolution in their pulse profile at low frequency and a break in their spectral index. We report DM measurements for 44 pulsars, mean flux density measurements for 36 pulsars, and multi-frequency component spacing and widths for 15 pulsars with more than one profile component. For 27 pulsars, we report spectral index measurements within our frequency range. We also introduce the LWA1 Pulsar Data Archive, which stores reduced data products from LWA1 pulsar observations. Reduced data products for the observations presented here can be found on the archive. Reduced data products from future LWA1 pulsar observations will also be made available through the archive.
  • Previously unremarkable, the extragalactic radio source GB 1310+487 showed a gamma-ray flare on 2009 November 18, reaching a daily flux of ~10^-6 photons/cm^2/s at energies E>100 MeV and becoming one of the brightest GeV sources for about two weeks. Its optical spectrum is not typical for a blazar, instead, it resembles those of narrow emission-line galaxies. We investigate changes of the object's radio-to-GeV spectral energy distribution (SED) during and after the prominent GeV flare with the aim to determine the nature of the object and constrain the origin of the variable high-energy emission. The data collected by the Fermi and AGILE satellites at gamma-ray energies, Swift at X-ray and ultraviolet, Kanata, NOT, and Keck telescopes at optical, OAGH and WISE at infrared, and IRAM 30m, OVRO 40m, Effelsberg 100m, RATAN-600, and VLBA at radio, are analysed together to trace the SED evolution on timescales of months. The gamma-ray/radio-loud narrow-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) is located at redshift z=0.638. It is shining through an unrelated foreground galaxy at z=0.500. The AGN light is likely amplified by a factor of a few because of gravitational lensing. The AGN SED shows a two-humped structure typical of blazars and gamma-ray-loud NLSy1 galaxies, with the high-energy (inverse-Compton) emission dominating by more than an order of magnitude over the low-energy (synchrotron) emission during gamma-ray flares. The difference between the two SED humps is smaller during the low-activity state. Fermi observations reveal a strong correlation between the gamma-ray flux and spectral index, with the hardest spectrum observed during the brightest gamma-ray state. If the gamma-ray flux is a mixture of synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) and external Compton (EC) emission, the observed GeV spectral variability may result from varying relative contributions of these two emission components.
  • Quasar 3C 279 is known to exhibit episodes of optical polarization angle rotation. We present new, well-sampled optical polarization data for 3C 279 and introduce a method to distinguish between random and deterministic electric vector position angle (EVPA) variations. We observe EVPA rotations in both directions with different amplitudes and find that the EVPA variation shows characteristics of both random and deterministic cases. Our analysis indicates that the EVPA variation is likely dominated by a random process in the low brightness state of the jet and by a deterministic process in the flaring state.
  • LWA1 is a new radio telescope operating in the frequency range 10-88 MHz, located in central New Mexico. The telescope consists of 258 pairs of dipole-type antennas whose outputs are individually digitized and formed into beams. Simultaneously, signals from all dipoles can be recorded using one of the instrument's "all dipoles" modes, facilitating all-sky imaging. Notable features of the instrument include high intrinsic sensitivity (about 6 kJy zenith system equivalent flux density), large instantaneous bandwidth (up to 78 MHz), and 4 independently-steerable beams utilizing digital "true time delay" beamforming. This paper summarizes the design of LWA1 and its performance as determined in commissioning experiments. We describe the method currently in use for array calibration, and report on measurements of sensitivity and beamwidth.
  • We investigate the radio and gamma-ray variability of the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1510-089 in the time range between 2010 November and 2012 January. In this period the source showed an intense activity, with two major gamma-ray flares detected in 2011 July and October. During the latter episode both the gamma-ray and the radio flux density reached their historical peak. Multiwavelength analysis shows a rotation of about 380 deg of the optical polarization angle close in time with the rapid and strong gamma-ray flare in 2011 July. An enhancement of the optical emission and an increase of the fractional polarization both in the optical and in radio bands is observed about three weeks later, close in time with another gamma-ray outburst. On the other hand, after 2011 September a huge radio outburst has been detected, first in the millimeter regime followed with some time delay at centimeter down to decimeter wavelengths. This radio flare is characterized by a rising and a decaying stage, in agreement with the formation of a shock and its evolution, as a consequence of expansion and radiative cooling. If the gamma-ray flare observed in 2011 October is related to this radio outburst, then this strongly indicates that the region responsible for the gamma-ray variability is not within the broad line, but a few parsecs downstream along the jet.
  • The parsec-scale radio properties of 232 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), most of which are blazars, detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have been observed contemporaneously by the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. Data from both the first 11 months (1FGL) and the first 2 years (2FGL) of the Fermi mission were used to investigate these sources' gamma-ray properties. We use the ratio of the gamma-ray to radio luminosity as a measure of gamma-ray loudness. We investigate the relationship of several radio properties to gamma-ray loudness and to the synchrotron peak frequency. There is a tentative correlation between gamma-ray loudness and synchrotron peak frequency for BL Lac objects in both 1FGL and 2FGL, and for flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) in 2FGL. We find that the apparent opening angle tentatively correlates with gamma-ray loudness for FSRQs, but only when we use the 2FGL data. We also find that the total VLBA flux density correlates with the synchrotron peak frequency for BL Lac objects and FSRQs. The core brightness temperature also correlates with synchrotron peak frequency, but only for the BL Lac objects. The low-synchrotron peaked (LSP) BL Lac object sample shows indications of contamination by FSRQs which happen to have undetectable emission lines. There is evidence that the LSP BL Lac objects are more strongly beamed than the rest of the BL Lac object population.
  • The first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1) was completed in April 2011 and is currently performing observations resulting from its first call for proposals in addition to a continuing program of commissioning and characterization observations. The instrument consists of 258 dual-polarization dipoles, which are digitized and combined into beams. Four independently-steerable dual-polarization beams are available, each with two "tunings" of 16 MHz bandwidth that can be independently tuned to any frequency between 10 MHz and 88 MHz. The system equivalent flux density for zenith pointing is ~3 kJy and is approximately independent of frequency; this corresponds to a sensitivity of ~5 Jy/beam (5sigma, 1 s); making it one of the most sensitive meter-wavelength radio telescopes. LWA1 also has two "transient buffer" modes which allow coherent recording from all dipoles simultaneously, providing instantaneous all-sky field of view. LWA1 provides versatile and unique new capabilities for Galactic science, pulsar science, solar and planetary science, space weather, cosmology, and searches for astrophysical transients. Results from LWA1 will detect or tightly constrain the presence of hot Jupiters within 50 parsecs of Earth. LWA1 will provide excellent resolution in frequency and in time to examine phenomena such as solar bursts, and pulsars over a 4:1 frequency range that includes the poorly understood turnover and steep-spectrum regimes. Observations to date have proven LWA1's potential for pulsar observing, and just a few seconds with the completed 256-dipole LWA1 provide the most sensitive images of the sky at 23 MHz obtained yet. We are operating LWA1 as an open skies radio observatory, offering ~2000 beam-hours per year to the general community.
  • We report the development of a semi-automatic pipeline for the calibration of 86 GHz full-polarization observations performed with the Global Millimeter-VLBI array (GMVA) and describe the calibration strategy followed in the data reduction. Our calibration pipeline involves non-standard procedures, since VLBI polarimetry at frequencies above 43 GHz is not yet well established. We also present, for the first time, a full-polarization global-VLBI image at 86 GHz (source 3C 345), as an example of the final product of our calibration pipeline, and discuss the effect of instrumental limitations on the fidelity of the polarization images. Our calibration strategy is not exclusive for the GMVA, and could be applied on other VLBI arrays at millimeter wavelengths. The use of this pipeline will allow GMVA observers to get fully-calibrated datasets shortly after the data correlation.
  • Aims: 3C345 was recently identified as a gamma-ray emitter, based on the first 20 months of Fermi-LAT data and optical monitoring. In this paper, a connection between the gamma-ray and optical variability of 3C345 and properties of its parsec-scale radio emission is investigated. Methods: The Fermi-LAT data of 3C345, covering an energy range of 0.1-300 GeV, were combined with 32 Very Long Baseline Array observations of the object made at 43.2 GHz in the period of January 2008 - March 2010. Results: The VLBA data reveal morphology and kinematics of the flow on scales of up to ~5 milliarcseconds (mas; deprojected linear distances of 380 parsecs). The brightness temperature, T_b(r), measured along the jet first decreases with distance proportional to r^-(0.95 +/-0.69) and later exhibits a break at ~0.3 mas, with T_b(r) proportional to r^-(4.11 +/-0.85) at larger separations. Variations of the gamma-ray, optical and parsec-scale radio emission show a similar long-term trend persistent during the entire VLBA monitoring period. The gamma-ray and optical variations on shorter time scales are related to structural changes in the jet on scales of ~0.3 mas (~23 parsecs, deprojected), with the gamma-ray and optical flares possibly related to the evolution of four distinct superluminal components identified in the flow. Conclusions: The observations indicate that both the quiescent and flaring components of the gamma-ray emission are produced in a region of the jet of ~23 pc in extent. This region may mark the Compton-loss dominated zone of the flow and its large extent may favor the synchrotron self-Compton mechanism for gamma-ray production in the relativistic jet of the quasar 3C345.
  • In this paper we report on the two-year-long Fermi-LAT observation of the peculiar blazar 4C +21.35 (PKS 1222+216). This source was in a quiescent state from the start of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in 2008 August until 2009 September, and then became more active, with gradually increasing flux and some moderately-bright flares. In 2010 April and June, 4C +21.35 underwent a very strong GeV outburst composed of several major flares characterized by rise and decay timescales of the order of a day. During the outburst, the GeV spectra of 4C +21.35 displayed a broken power-law form with spectral breaks observed near 1-3 GeV photon energies. We demonstrate that, at least during the major flares, the jet in 4C +21.35 carried a total kinetic luminosity comparable to the total accretion power available to feed the outflow. We also discuss the origin of the break observed in the flaring spectra of 4C +21.35. We show that, in principle, a model involving annihilation of the GeV photons on the He II Lyman recombination continuum and line emission of "broad line region" clouds may account for such. However, we also discuss the additional constraint provided by the detection of 4C +21.35 at 0.07-0.4 TeV energies by the MAGIC telescope, which coincided with one of the GeV flares of the source. We argue that there are reasons to believe that the $lesssim$,TeV emission of 4C +21.35 (as well as the GeV emission of the source, if co-spatial), is not likely to be produced inside the broad line region zone of highest ionization ($sim 10^{17}$,cm from the nucleus), but instead originates further away from the active center, namely around the characteristic scale of the hot dusty torus surrounding the 4C +21.35 nucleus ($sim 10^{19}$,cm).
  • 3C 345 is one of the archetypical active galactic nuclei, showing structural and flux variability on parsec scales near a compact unresolved radio core. During the last 2 years, the source has been undergoing a period of high activity visible in the broad spectral range, from radio through high-energy bands. We have been monitoring parsec-scale radio emission in 3C 345 during this period at monthly intervals, using the VLBA at 15, 24, and 43 GHz. Our radio observations are compared with gamma-ray emission detected by Fermi-LAT in the region including 3C 345 (1FGL J1642.5+3947). Three distinct gamma-ray events observed in this region are associated with the propagation of relativistic plasma condensations inside the radio jet of 3C 345. We report on evidence for the gamma-rays to be produced in a region of the jet of up to 40 pc (de-projected) in extent. This suggests the synchrotron self-Compton process as the most likely mechanism for production of gamma-rays in the source.
  • Single-zone synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton models are widely used to explain broad-band Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of blazars from infrared to gamma-rays. These models bear obvious similarities to the homogeneous synchrotron cloud model which is often applied to explain radio emission from individual components of parsec-scale radio jets. The parsec-scale core, typically the brightest and most compact feature of blazar radio jet, could be the source of high-energy emission. We report on ongoing work to test this hypothesis by deriving the physical properties of parsec-scale radio emitting regions of twenty bright Fermi blazars using dedicated 5-43 GHz VLBA observations and comparing these parameters to results of SED modeling.