• We present the calibration of the Swift UVOT grisms, of which there are two, providing low-resolution field spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and optical bands respectively. The UV grism covers the range 1700-5000 Angstrom with a spectral resolution of 75 at 2600 Angstrom for source magnitudes of u=10-16 mag, while the visible grism covers the range 2850-6600 Angstrom with a spectral resolution of 100 at 4000 Angstrom for source magnitudes of b=12-17 mag. This calibration extends over all detector positions, for all modes used during operations. The wavelength accuracy (1-sigma) is 9 Angstrom in the UV grism clocked mode, 17 Angstrom in the UV grism nominal mode and 22 Angstrom in the visible grism. The range below 2740 Angstrom in the UV grism and 5200 Angstrom in the visible grism never suffers from overlapping by higher spectral orders. The flux calibration of the grisms includes a correction we developed for coincidence loss in the detector. The error in the coincidence loss correction is less than 20%. The position of the spectrum on the detector only affects the effective area (sensitivity) by a few percent in the nominal modes, but varies substantially in the clocked modes. The error in the effective area is from 9% in the UV grism clocked mode to 15% in the visible grism clocked mode .
  • Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars, and are typically found in the distant Universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity ($L\sim 3 \times 10^{53}$ erg s$^{-1}$) and its relative proximity ($z=0.34$), GRB 130427A was a unique event that reached the highest fluence observed in the gamma-ray band. Here we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-m Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early Universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.
  • We present the photometric calibration of the Swift UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) which includes: optimum photometric and background apertures, effective area curves, colour transformations, conversion factors for count rates to flux, and the photometric zero points (which are accurate to better than 4 per cent) for each of the seven UVOT broadband filters. The calibration was performed with observations of standard stars and standard star fields that represent a wide range of spectral star types. The calibration results include the position dependent uniformity, and instrument response over the 1600-8000A operational range. Because the UVOT is a photon counting instrument, we also discuss the effect of coincidence loss on the calibration results. We provide practical guidelines for using the calibration in UVOT data analysis. The results presented here supersede previous calibration results.
  • Almost the totality of the bright foreground sources in the WMAP CMB maps are blazars, a class of sources that show usually also X-ray emission. However, 23 objects in a flux-limited sample of 140 blazars of the WMAP catalog (first year) were never reported before as X-ray sources. We present here the results of 41 Swift observations which led to the detection of all these 23 blazars in the 0.3-10 keV band. We conclude that all micro-wave selected blazars are X-ray emitters and that the distribution of the micro-wave to X-ray spectral slope $\alpha_{mu x}$ of LBL blazars is very narrow, confirming that the X-ray flux of most blazars is a very good estimator of their micro-wave emission. The X-ray spectral shape of all the objects that were observed long enough to allow spectral analysis is flat and consistent with inverse Compton emission within the commonly accepted view where the radiation from blazars is emitted in a Sychrotron-Inverse-Compton scenario. We predict that all blazars and most radio galaxies above the sensitivity limit of the WMAP and of the Planck CMB missions are X-ray sources detectable by the present generation of X-ray satellites. An hypothetical all-sky soft X-ray survey with sensitivity of approximately $10^{-15}$ erg/s would be crucial to locate and remove over 100,000 blazars from CMB temperature and polarization maps and therefore accurately clean the primordial CMB signal from the largest population of extragalactic foreground contaminants.
  • Swift discovered the high redshift (z=6.29) GRB050904 with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and began observing with its narrow field instruments 161 s after the burst onset. This gamma-ray burst is the most distant cosmic explosion ever observed. Because of its high redshift, the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and BAT simultaneous observations provide 4 orders of magnitude of spectral coverage (0.2-150 keV; 1.4-1090 keV in the source rest frame) at a very early source-frame time (22 s). GRB050904 was a long, multi-peaked, bright GRB with strong variability during its entire evolution. The light curve observed by the XRT is characterized by the presence of a long flaring activity lasting up to 1-2 hours after the burst onset in the burst rest frame, with no evidence of a smooth power-law decay following the prompt emission as seen in other GRBs. However, the BAT tail extrapolated to the XRT band joins the XRT early light curve and the overall behavior resembles that of a very long GRB prompt. The spectral energy distribution softens with time, with the photon index decreasing from -1.2 during the BAT observation to -1.9 at the end of the XRT observation. The dips of the late X-ray flares may be consistent with an underlying X-ray emission arising from the forward shock and with the properties of the optical afterglow reported by Tagliaferri et al. (2005b). We interpret the BAT and XRT data as a single continuous observation of the prompt emission from a very long GRB. The peculiarities observed in GRB050904 could be due to its origin within one of the first star-forming regions in the Universe; very low metallicities of the progenitor at these epochs may provide an explanation.
  • We present observations of the X-ray afterglow of GRB 050408, a gamma-ray burst discovered by HETE-II. Swift began observing the field 42 min after the burst, performing follow-up over a period of 38 d (thus spanning three decades in time).The X-ray light curve showed a steepening with time, similar to many other afterglows. However, the steepening was unusually smooth, over the duration of the XRT observation, with no clear break time. The early decay was too flat to be described in terms of standard models. We therefore explore alternative explanations, such as the presence of a structured afterglow or of long-lasting energy injection into the fireball from the central GRB engine. The lack of a sharp break puts constraints on these two models. In the former case, it may indicate that the angular energy profile of the jet was not a simple power law, while in the second model it implies that injection did not stop abruptly. The late decay may be due either to a standard afterglow (that is, with no energy injection), or to a jetted outflow still being refreshed. A significant amount of absorption was present in the X-ray spectrum, corresponding to a rest-frame Hydrogen column density NH = 1.2 (-0.3,+0.4)*10^22 cm^-2, indicative of a dense environment.
  • We present ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometry of the afterglow of the X-ray flash XRF 050416A taken between approximately 100 seconds and 36 days after the burst. We find an intrinsic spectral slope between 1930 and 22,200 Angstrom of beta = -1.14 +/- 0.20 and a decay rate of alpha = -0.86 +/- 0.15. There is no evidence for a change in the decay rate between approximately 0.7 and 4.7 days after the burst. Our data implies that there is no spectral break between the optical and X-ray bands between 0.7 and 4.7 days after the burst, and is consistent with the cooling break being redward of the K_s band (22,200 Angstrom) at 0.7 days. The combined ultraviolet/optical/infrared spectral energy distribution shows no evidence for a significant amount of extinction in the host galaxy along the line of sight to XRF 050416A. Our data suggest that the extragalactic extinction along the line of sight to the burst is only approximately A_V = 0.2 mag, which is significantly less than the extinction expected from the hydrogen column density inferred from $X$-ray observations of XRF 050416A assuming a dust-to-gas ratio similar to what is found for the Milky Way. The observed extinction, however, is consistent with the dust-to-gas ratio seen in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We suggest that XRF 050416A may have a two-component jet similar to what has been proposed for GRB 030329. If this is the case the lack of an observed jet break between 0.7 and 42 days is an illusion due to emission from the wide jet dominating the afterglow after approximately 1.5 days.
  • Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of high energy photons that can last from about 10 milliseconds to 10 minutes. Their origin and nature have puzzled the scientific community for about 25 years until 1997, when the first X-ray afterglows of long (> 2 s duration) bursts were detected and the first optical and radio counterparts were found. These measurements established that long GRBs are typically at high redshift (z 1.6) and are in sub-luminous star-forming host galaxies. They are likely produced in core-collapse explosions of a class of massive stars that give rise to highly relativistic jets (collapsar model). Internal inhomogeneities in the velocity field of the relativistic expanding flow lead to collisions between fast moving and slow moving fluid shells and to the formation of internal shock waves. These shocks are believed to produce the observed prompt emission in the form of irregularly shaped and spaced pulses of gamma-rays, each pulse corresponding to a distinct internal collision. The expansion of the jet outward into the circumstellar medium is believed to give rise to ``external'' shocks, responsible for producing the smoothly fading afterglow emission seen in the X-ray, optical and radio bands. Here we report on the gamma-ray and x-ray observation of the most distant gamma-ray burst ever observed: its redshift of 6.29 translates to a distance of 13 billion light-years from Earth, corresponding to a time when the Universe was just 700 million to 750 million years old. The discovery of a gamma-ray burst at such a large redshift implies the presence of massive stars only 700 million years after the Big Bang. The very high redshift bursts represent a good way to study the re-ionization era soon after the Universe came out of the Dark Ages.
  • Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows have provided important clues to the nature of these massive explosive events, providing direct information on the nearby environment and indirect information on the central engine that powers the burst. We report the discovery of two bright X-ray flares in GRB afterglows, including a giant flare comparable in total energy to the burst itself, each peaking minutes after the burst. These strong, rapid X-ray flares imply that the central engines of the bursts have long periods of activity, with strong internal shocks continuing for hundreds of seconds after the gamma-ray emission has ended.
  • We report on the discovery of two emission features observed in the X-ray spectrum of the afterglow of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) of 16 Dec. 1999 by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. These features are identified with the Ly$_{\alpha}$ line and the narrow recombination continuum by hydrogenic ions of iron at a redshift $z=1.00\pm0.02$, providing an unambiguous measurement of the distance of a GRB. Line width and intensity imply that the progenitor of the GRB was a massive star system that ejected, before the GRB event, $\approx 0.01 \Ms$ of iron at a velocity $\approx 0.1 c$, probably by a supernova explosion.
  • Soft gamma repeaters are high-energy transient sources associated with neutron stars in young supernova remnants. They emit sporadic, short (~ 0.1 s) bursts with soft energy spectra during periods of intense activity. The event of March 5, 1979 was the most intense and the only clearly periodic one to date. Here we report on an even more intense burst on August 27, 1998, from a different soft gamma repeater, which displayed a hard energy spectrum at its peak, and was followed by a ~300 s long tail with a soft energy spectrum and a dramatic 5.16 s period. Its peak and time integrated energy fluxes at Earth are the largest yet observed from any cosmic source. This event was probably initiated by a massive disruption of the neutron star crust, followed by an outflow of energetic particles rotating with the period of the star. Comparison of these two bursts supports the idea that magnetic energy plays an important role, and that such giant flares, while rare, are not unique, and may occur at any time in the neutron star's activity cycle.
  • A new x-ray transient, designated XTE J1739-302, was discovered with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in data from 12 August 1997. Although it was the brightest source in the Galactic Center region while active (about 3.0 x 10^-9 ergs/cm2/s from 2 to 25 keV), it was only observed on that one day; it was not detectable nine days earlier or two days later. There is no known counterpart at other wavelengths, and its proximity to the Galactic Center will make such an identification difficult due to source confusion and extinction. The x-ray spectrum and intensity suggest a giant outburst of a Be/neutron star binary, although no pulsations were observed and the outburst was shorter than is usual from these systems.
  • We report preliminary results of a multi-frequency campaign on the TeV candidate blazar W Comae (z=0.102). Flux limits by Whipple and HEGRA show that the TeV flux must be considerably below an E^-2 extrapolation of the EGRET flux. In the framework of proton-initiated cascade models, this implies a moderate amount of gamma-ray attenuation due to pair production in collisions with low-energy photons of the extragalactic infrared background. In a simple SSC model, the gamma-ray spectrum cuts off intrinsically just below TeV without requiring external absorption.