• Superclusters form from the largest enhancements in the primordial density perturbation field and extend for tens of Mpc, tracing the large-scale structure of the Universe. We characterise XLSSsCN01, a rich supercluster at z~0.3 detected in the XXL Survey, composed of X-ray clusters of different virial masses and luminosities. As one of the first studies on this topic, we investigate the stellar populations of galaxies in different environments in the supercluster region. We study a magnitude-limited (r<=20) and a mass-limited sample (log(M*/M_sun)>10.8) of galaxies in the virialised region and in the outskirts of 11 XLSSsCN01 clusters, in high- and low-density field. We compute the stellar population properties of galaxies using spectral energy distribution and spectral fitting techniques, and study the dependence of star formation rates (SFR), colours, and stellar ages on environment. For r<20, the fraction of SFing/blue galaxies, computed either from the specific-SFR (sSFR) or rest-frame(rf) colour, shows depletion within the cluster virial radii, where the number of galaxies with log(sSFR/yr^-1)>-12 and with (g-r)_rf<0.6 is lower than in the field. For log(M*/M_sun)>10.8, no trends with environment emerge, as massive galaxies are mostly already passive in all environments. No differences among low- and high-density field members and cluster members emerge in the sSFR-mass relation. The luminosity-weighted age-mass relation of the passive populations within cluster virial radii show signatures of recent environmental quenching. The study of luminous and massive galaxies in this supercluster shows that while environment has a prominent role in determining the fractions of SFing/blue galaxies, its effects on the star formation activity in SFing galaxies are negligible.
  • The XMM-XXL Survey spans two fields of $\rm 25$ deg$^2$ each observed for more than 6Ms with XMM, which provided a sample of tens of thousands of point sources with a flux limit of $\sim 2.2 \times 10^{-15}$ and $\sim 1.4 \times 10^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{2}$, corresponding to 50% of the area curve, in the soft band and hard band, respectively. In this paper we present the spatial clustering properties of $\sim 3100$ and $\sim 1900$ X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the 0.5-2 and 2-10 keV bands, respectively, which have been spectroscopically observed with the AAOmega facility. This sample is 90% redshift complete down to an optical magnitude limit of $r\lesssim 21.8$. The sources span the redshift interval $0<z<5.2$, although in the current analysis we limit our samples to $z\le 3$, with corresponding sample median values of $\bar{z}\simeq 0.96$ and 0.79 for the soft band and hard band, respectively. We employ the projected two-point correlation function to infer the spatial clustering and find a correlation length $r_0=7.0 (\pm 0.34)$ and 6.42$(\pm 0.42)$ $h^{-1}$ Mpc, respectively, for the soft- and hard-band detected sources with a slope for both cases of $\gamma=1.44 (\pm 0.1)$. The power-law clustering was detected within comoving separations of 1 and $\sim$25 $h^{-1}$ Mpc. These results, as well as those derived in two separate redshift ranges, provide bias factors of the corresponding AGN host dark matter halos that are consistent with a halo mass of $\log_{10} [M_h/(h^{-1} M_{\odot})]=13.04\pm 0.06$, confirming the results of most recent studies based on smaller X-ray AGN samples.
  • We present a comparison of two samples of z>0.8 galaxy clusters selected using different wavelength-dependent techniques and examine the physical differences between them. We consider 18 clusters from the X-ray selected XMM-LSS distant cluster survey and 92 clusters from the optical-MIR selected SpARCS cluster survey. Both samples are selected from the same approximately 9 square degree sky area and we examine them using common XMM-Newton, Spitzer-SWIRE and CFHT Legacy Survey data. Clusters from each sample are compared employing aperture measures of X-ray and MIR emission. We divide the SpARCS distant cluster sample into three sub-samples: a) X-ray bright, b) X-ray faint, MIR bright, and c) X-ray faint, MIR faint clusters. We determine that X-ray and MIR selected clusters display very similar surface brightness distributions of galaxy MIR light. In addition, the average location and amplitude of the galaxy red sequence as measured from stacked colour histograms is very similar in the X-ray and MIR-selected samples. The sub-sample of X-ray faint, MIR bright clusters displays a distribution of BCG-barycentre position offsets which extends to higher values than all other samples. This observation indicates that such clusters may exist in a more disturbed state compared to the majority of the distant cluster population sampled by XMM-LSS and SpARCS. This conclusion is supported by stacked X-ray images for the X-ray faint, MIR bright cluster sub-sample that display weak, centrally-concentrated X-ray emission, consistent with a population of growing clusters accreting from an extended envelope of material.
  • The use of galaxy clusters as precision cosmological probes relies on an accurate determination of their masses. However, inferring the relationship between cluster mass and observables from direct observations is difficult and prone to sample selection biases. In this work, we use weak lensing as the best possible proxy for cluster mass to calibrate the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect measurements from the APEX-SZ experiment. For a well-defined (ROSAT) X-ray complete cluster sample, we calibrate the integrated Comptonization parameter, $Y_{\rm SZ}$, to the weak-lensing derived total cluster mass, $M_{500}$. We employ a novel Bayesian approach to account for the selection effects by jointly fitting both the SZ Comptonization, $Y_{\rm SZ}\text{--}M_{500}$, and the X-ray luminosity, $L_{\rm x}\text{--}M_{500}$, scaling relations. We also account for a possible correlation between the intrinsic (log-normal) scatter of $L_{\rm x}$ and $Y_{\rm SZ}$ at fixed mass. We find the corresponding correlation coefficient to be $r= 0.47_{-0.35}^{+0.24}$, and at the current precision level our constraints on the scaling relations are consistent with previous works. For our APEX-SZ sample, we find that ignoring the covariance between the SZ and X-ray observables biases the normalization of the $Y_{\rm SZ}\text{--}M_{500}$ scaling high by $1\text{--}2\sigma$ and the slope low by $\sim 1\sigma$, even when the SZ effect plays no role in the sample selection. We conclude that for higher-precision data and larger cluster samples, as anticipated from on-going and near-future cluster cosmology experiments, similar biases (due to intrinsic covariances of cluster observables) in the scaling relations will dominate the cosmological error budget if not accounted for correctly.
  • Following extensive tests on analytical toy-catalogues (paper III), we present the results of a more realistic study over a 711 deg2 template-based cosmological simulation. Dark matter halos from the Aardvark simulation have been ascribed luminosities, temperatures and core-radii, using local scaling relations and assuming self-similar evolution. Predicted X-ray sky-maps are converted into XMM event lists using an instrumental simulator. The XXL pipeline run on the resulting sky images, produces an 'observed' cluster catalogue over which the tests have been performed. This allowed us to investigate the relative power of various combinations of count-rate, hardness-ratio, apparent-size and redshift information. Two fitting methods were used : a traditional MCMC approach and a simple minimisation procedure (Amoeba) whose mean uncertainties are a posteriori evaluated by means of synthetic catalogues. Results were analysed and compared to the predictions from a Fisher analysis (FA). For this particular catalogue realisation, assuming perfectly known scaling relations, the CR-HR combination gives $\sigma_8$ and $\Omega_m$ at the 10% level, while CR-HR-r$_c$-z improves this to $\leq$ 3%. Adding a second hardness ratio improves results from the CR-HR1-r$_c$ combination, but to a lesser extent than adding redshift information. When all coefficients of the M-T relation (including scatter) are also fitted, cosmological parameters are constrained to within 5-10%, and larger for the M-T coefficients (up to a factor of two for the scatter). Errors returned by the MCMC, by Amoeba, and by FA predictions, are in most cases in excellent agreement and always within a factor of two. We also study the impact of the scatter of the M-Rc relation on the number of detected clusters: for the cluster typical sizes usually assumed, the larger the scatter, the lower the number of detected objects.
  • The fraction of galaxies bound in groups in the nearby Universe is high (50% at z~0). Systematic studies of galaxy properties in groups are important in order to improve our understanding of the evolution of galaxies and of the physical phenomena occurring within this environment. We have built a complete spectrophotometric sample of galaxies within X-ray detected, optically spectroscopically confirmed groups and clusters (G&C), covering a wide range of halo masses at z<= 0.6. In the context of the XXL survey, we analyse a sample of 164 G&C in the XXL-North region (XXL-N), at z <= 0.6, with a wide range of virial masses (1.24 x 10^13 <=M_500 M_sun <= 6.63 x 10^14) and X-ray luminosities ( 2.27 x 10^41 <= L^XXL_500 (erg/s)<= 2.15 x10^44). The G&C are X-ray selected and spectroscopically confirmed. We describe the membership assignment and the spectroscopic completeness analysis, and compute stellar masses. As a first scientific exploitation of the sample, we study the dependence of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) on global environment. We present a spectrophotometric characterisation of the G&C and their galaxies. The final sample contains 132 G&C, 22111 field galaxies and 2225 G&C galaxies with r-band magnitude <20. Of the G&C, 95% have at least three spectroscopic members, and 70% at least ten. The shape of the GSMF seems not to depend on environment (field versus G&C) or X-ray luminosity ( used as a proxy for the virial mass of the system). These results are confirmed by the study of the correlation between mean stellar mass of G&C members and L^XXL_500.We release the spectrophotometric catalogue of galaxies with all the quantities computed in this work. As a first homogeneous census of galaxies within X-ray spectroscopically confirmed G&C at these redshifts, this sample will allow environmental studies of the evolution of galaxy properties.
  • Modern cosmological simulations rely heavily on feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) in order to stave off overcooling in massive galaxies and galaxy groups and clusters. An important independent test is whether or not the simulations capture the broad demographics of the observed AGN population. Here, we have used the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to produce realistic synthetic catalogs of X-ray AGN out to $z$=3, with the aim of comparing the catalogs to the observed X-ray AGN population in the XXL survey and other recent surveys. We focused on the unabsorbed X-ray luminosity function (XLF), the Eddington ratio distribution, the black hole mass function, and the projected clustering of X-ray AGN. To compute the unabsorbed XLF of the simulated AGN, we used recent empirically-determined bolometric corrections. We show that the simulated AGN sample accurately reproduces the observed XLF over 3 orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity in all redshift bins. To compare to the observed Eddington ratio distribution and the clustering of AGN, we produced detailed 'XMM-Newton-detected' catalogs of the simulated AGN. This requires the production of synthetic X-ray images extracted from light cones of the simulations that fold in the relevant instrumental effects of XMM-Newton. We apply a luminosity- and redshift-dependent obscuration function for the AGN and employ the same AGN detection algorithm as used for the real XXL survey. We demonstrate that the detected population of simulated AGN reproduces the observed Eddington ratio distribution and projected clustering from XXL quite well. We conclude that the simulations have a broadly realistic population of AGN and that our synthetic X-ray AGN catalogs should be useful for interpreting additional trends and as a helpful tool for quantifying AGN contamination in galaxy group and cluster X-ray surveys.
  • Despite compelling theoretical arguments, the use of clusters as cosmological probes is, in practice, frequently questioned because of the many uncertainties impinging on cluster mass estimates. Our aim is to develop a fully self-consistent cosmological approach of X-ray cluster surveys, exclusively based on observable quantities, rather than masses. This procedure is justified given the possibility to directly derive the cluster properties via ab initio modelling, either analytically or by using hydrodynamical simulations. In this third paper, we evaluate the method on cluster toy-catalogues. We model the population of detected clusters in the count-rate -- hardness-ratio -- angular size -- redshift space and compare the corresponding 4-dimensional diagram with theoretical predictions. The best cosmology+physics parameter configuration is determined using a simple minimisation procedure; errors on the parameters are derived by scanning the likelihood hyper-surfaces with a wide range of starting values. The method allows a simultaneous fit of the cosmological parameters, of the cluster evolutionary physics and of the selection effects. When using information from the X-ray survey alone plus redshifts, this approach is shown to be as accurate as the mass function for the cosmological parameters and to perform better for the cluster physics, as modelled in the scaling relations. It enables the identification of degenerate combinations of parameter values. Given the considerably shorter computer times involved for running the minimisation procedure in the observed parameter space, this method appears to clearly outperform traditional mass-based approaches when X-ray survey data alone are available.
  • The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z<2) cluster, (z<4) AGN and cosmic background survey science will then benefit from an extraordinary data reservoir. This, combined with deep multi-$\lambda$ observations, will lead to solid standalone cosmological constraints and provide a wealth of information on the formation and evolution of AGN, clusters and the X-ray background. In particular, it will offer a unique opportunity to pinpoint the z>1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.
  • The XMM Cluster Archive Super Survey (X-CLASS) is a serendipitously-detected X-ray-selected sample of 845 galaxy clusters based on 2774 XMM archival observations and covering approximately 90 deg$^2$ spread across the high-Galactic latitude ($|b|>20$ deg) sky. The primary goal of this survey is to produce a well-selected sample of galaxy clusters on which cosmological analyses can be performed. This article presents the photometric redshift followup of a high signal-to-noise subset of 266 of these clusters with declination $\delta<+20$ deg with GROND, a seven channel ($grizJHK$) simultaneous imager on the MPG 2.2m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. We use a newly developed technique based on the red sequence colour-redshift relation, enhanced with information coming from the X-ray detection to provide photometric redshifts for this sample. We determine photometric redshifts for 236 clusters, finding a median redshift of $z=0.39$ with an accuracy of $\Delta z = 0.02 (1+z)$ when compared to a sample of 76 spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We also compute X-ray luminosities for the entire sample and find a median bolometric luminosity of $7.2\times10^{43} \mathrm{erg\ s^{-1}}$ and a median temperature 2.9 keV. We compare our results to the XMM-XCS and XMM-XXL surveys, finding good agreement in both samples. The X-CLASS catalogue is available online at http://xmm-lss.in2p3.fr:8080/l4sdb/.
  • We present \Chandra\ observations of 23 galaxy groups and low-mass galaxy clusters at $0.03<z<0.15$ with a median temperature of ~2keV. The sample is a statistically complete flux-limited subset of the 400 deg$^2$ survey. We investigated the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity ($L$) and temperature ($T$), taking selection biases fully into account. The logarithmic slope of the bolometric \LT\ relation was found to be $3.29\pm0.33$, consistent with values typically found for samples of more massive clusters. In combination with other recent studies of the \LT\ relation we show that there is no evidence for the slope, normalisation, or scatter of the \LT\ relation of galaxy groups being different than that of massive clusters. The exception to this is that in the special case of the most relaxed systems, the slope of the core-excised \LT\ relation appears to steepen from the self-similar value found for massive clusters to a steeper slope for the lower mass sample studied here. Thanks to our rigorous treatment of selection biases, these measurements provide a robust reference against which to compare predictions of models of the impact of feedback on the X-ray properties of galaxy groups.
  • The growth of brightest cluster galaxies is closely related to the properties of their host cluster. We present evidence for dry mergers as the dominant source of BCG mass growth at $z\lesssim1$ in the XXL 100 brightest cluster sample. We use the global red sequence, H$\alpha$ emission and mean star formation history to show that BCGs in the sample possess star formation levels comparable to field ellipticals of similar stellar mass and redshift. XXL 100 brightest clusters are less massive on average than those in other X-ray selected samples such as LoCuSS or HIFLUGCS. Few clusters in the sample display high central gas concentration, rendering inefficient the growth of BCGs via star formation resulting from the accretion of cool gas. Using measures of the relaxation state of their host clusters, we show that BCGs grow as relaxation proceeds. We find that the BCG stellar mass corresponds to a relatively constant fraction 1\%\ of the total cluster mass in relaxed systems. We also show that, following a cluster scale merger event, the BCG stellar mass lags behind the expected value from the M$_{cluster}$ - M$_{BCG}$ relation but subsequently accretes stellar mass via dry mergers as the BCG and cluster evolve towards a relaxed state.
  • We present observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 3 GHz toward a sub-field of the XXL-North 25 deg$^{2}$ field targeting the first supercluster discovered in the XXL Survey. The structure has been found at a spectroscopic redshift of 0.43 and extending over $0.35\times0.1$ deg$^{2}$ on the sky. We present the 3 GHz VLA radio continuum observations, the radio mosaic and radio source catalogue, and, perform an analysis of the supercluster in the optical and radio regimes using photometric redshifts from the CFHTLS survey and our new VLA data. Our 3 GHz radio mosaic has a resolution of $3.2\times1.9$ arcsec$^2$, and covers an area of $41\times41$ arcmin$^2$ with rms noise level below $\sim20 \mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ ($\sim11\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ in central $15\times15$ arcmin$^2$). We extract a catalogue of 155 radio sources $\geq6\sigma$, 8 of which are multicomponent sources, and 123 ($79\%$) can be associated with optical sources in the CFHTLS W1 catalogue. Applying Voronoi tessellation analysis (VTA) in the area around the X-ray identified supercluster we identify a total of 17 overdensities at $z=0.35-0.50$, 7 of which are associated with clusters detected in the $XMM-Newton$ XXL data. We find a mean photometric redshift of 0.43 for our overdensities, consistent with the spectroscopic redshifts of 7 X-ray detected clusters. The full VTA-identified structure extends over $\sim0.6\times0.2$ deg$^2$ on the sky, ($\sim12\times4$ Mpc$^{2}$ at $z=0.43$). We associate 8 radio sources with potential group/cluster member galaxies none of which are large radio galaxies. The spatial distribution of the red and blue potential group member galaxies suggests that the clusters are dynamically young and not virialised yet, as expected for hierarchical structure growth in a $\Lambda$CDM universe. Further spectroscopic data are required to analyze the dynamical state of the groups.
  • The XMM-LSS, XMM-COSMOS, and XMM-CDFS surveys are complementary in terms of sky coverage and depth. Together, they form a clean sample with the least possible variance in instrument effective areas and PSF. Therefore this is one of the best samples available to determine the 2-10 keV luminosity function of AGN and its evolution. The samples and the relevant corrections for incompleteness are described. A total of 2887 AGN is used to build the LF in the luminosity interval 10^42-10^46 erg/s, and in the redshift interval 0.001-4. A new method to correct for absorption by considering the probability distribution for the column density conditioned on the hardness ratio is presented. The binned luminosity function and its evolution is determined with a variant of the Page-Carrera method, improved to include corrections for absorption and to account for the full probability distribution of photometric redshifts. Parametric models, namely a double power-law with LADE or LDDE evolution, are explored using Bayesian inference. We introduce the Watanabe-Akaike information criterion (WAIC) to compare the models and estimate their predictive power. Our data are best described by the LADE model, as hinted by the WAIC indicator. We also explore the 15-parameter extended LDDE model recently proposed by Ueda et al., and find that this extension is not supported by our data. The strength of our method is that it provides: un-absorbed non-parametric estimates; credible intervals for luminosity function parameters; model choice according to which one has more predictive power for future data.
  • X-ray extragalactic surveys are ideal laboratories for the study of the evolution and clustering of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The XXL Survey spans two fields of a combined 50 $deg^2$ observed for more than 6Ms with XMM-Newton, occupying the parameter space between deep surveys and very wide area surveys; at the same time it benefits from a wealth of ancillary data. This paper marks the first release of the XXL point source catalogue selected in the 2-10 keV energy band with limiting flux $F_{2-10keV}=4.8\cdot10^{-14}\rm{erg\,s^{-1}\,cm^{-2}}$. We use both public and proprietary data sets to identify the counterparts of the X-ray point-like sources and improved upon the photometric redshift determination for AGN by applying a Random Forest classification trained to identify for each object the optimal photometric redshift model library. We also assign a probability to each source to be a star or an outlier. We model with Bayesian analysis the X-ray spectra assuming a power-law model with the presence of an absorbing medium. We find an average unabsorbed photon index of $\Gamma=1.85$ and average hydrogen column density $\log{N_{H}}=21.07 cm^{-2}$. We find no trend of $\Gamma$ or $N_H$ with redshift and a fraction of 26% absorbed sources ($\log N_{H}>22$). We show that the XXL-1000-AGN number counts extended the number counts of the COSMOS survey to higher fluxes and are fully consistent with the Euclidean expectation. We constrain the intrinsic luminosity function of AGN in the 2-10 keV energy band where the unabsorbed X-ray flux is estimated from the X-ray spectral fit up to z=3. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of a supercluster size structure at redshift 0.14, identified by means of percolation analysis of the XXL-1000-AGN sample. The XXL survey, reaching a medium flux limit and covering a wide area is a stepping stone between current deep fields and planned wide area surveys.
  • This article belongs to the first series of XXL publications. It presents multifibre spectroscopic observations of three 0.55 sq.deg. fields in the XXL Survey, which were selected on the basis of their high density of X-ray-detected clusters. The observations were obtained with the AutoFib2+WYFFOS (AF2) wide-field fibre spectrograph mounted on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. The paper first describes the scientific rationale, the preparation, the data reduction, and the results of the observations, and then presents a study of active galactic nuclei (AGN) within three superclusters. We obtained redshifts for 455 galaxies in total, 56 of which are counterparts of X-ray point-like sources. We were able to determine the redshift of the merging supercluster XLSSC-e, which consists of six individual clusters at z~0.43, and we confirmed the redshift of supercluster XLSSC-d at z~0.3. More importantly, we discovered a new supercluster, XLSSC-f, that comprises three galaxy clusters also at z~0.3. We find a significant 2D overdensity of X-ray point-like sources only around the supercluster XLSSC-f. This result is also supported by the spatial (3D) analysis of XLSSC-f, where we find four AGN with compatible spectroscopic redshifts and possibly one more with compatible photometric redshift. In addition, we find two AGN (3D analysis) at the redshift of XLSSC-e, but no AGN in XLSSC-d. Comparing these findings with the optical galaxy overdensity we conclude that the total number of AGN in the area of the three superclusters significantly exceeds the field expectations. The difference in the AGN frequency between the three superclusters cannot be explained by the present study because of small number statistics. Further analysis of a larger number of superclusters within the 50 sq. deg. of the XXL is needed before any conclusions on the effect of the supercluster environment on AGN can be reached.
  • Within a cluster, gravitational effects can lead to the removal of stars from their parent galaxies. Gas hydrodynamical effects can additionally strip gas and dust from galaxies. The properties of the ICL can therefore help constrain the physical processes at work in clusters by serving as a fossil record of the interaction history. The present study is designed to characterise this ICL in a ~10^14 M_odot and z~0.53 cluster of galaxies from imaging and spectroscopic points of view. By applying a wavelet-based method to CFHT Megacam and WIRCAM images, we detect significant quantities of diffuse light. These sources were then spectroscopically characterised with MUSE. MUSE data were also used to compute redshifts of 24 cluster galaxies and search for cluster substructures. An atypically large amount of ICL has been detected in this cluster. Part of the detected diffuse light has a very weak optical stellar component and apparently consists mainly of gas emission, while other diffuse light sources are clearly dominated by old stars. Furthermore, emission lines were detected in several places of diffuse light. Our spectral analysis shows that this emission likely originates from low-excitation parameter gas. The stellar contribution to the ICL is about 2.3x10^9 yrs old even though the ICL is not currently forming a large number of stars. On the other hand, the contribution of the gas emission to the ICL in the optical is much greater than the stellar contribution in some regions, but the gas density is likely too low to form stars. These observations favour ram pressure stripping, turbulent viscous stripping, or supernovae winds as the origin of the large amount of intracluster light. Since the cluster appears not to be in a major merging phase, we conclude that ram pressure stripping is the most plausible process that generates the observed ICL sources.
  • We present the K-band luminosity-halo mass relation, $L_{K,500}-M_{500,WL}$, for a subsample of 20 of the 100 brightest clusters in the XXL Survey observed with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). For the first time, we have measured this relation via weak-lensing analysis down to $M_{500,WL} =3.5 \times 10^{13}\,M_\odot$. This allows us to investigate whether the slope of the $L_K-M$ relation is different for groups and clusters, as seen in other works. The clusters in our sample span a wide range in mass, $M_{500,WL} =0.35-12.10 \times 10^{14}\,M_\odot$, at $0<z<0.6$. The K-band luminosity scales as $\log_{10}(L_{K,500}/10^{12}L_\odot) \propto \beta log_{10}(M_{500,WL}/10^{14}M_\odot)$ with $\beta = 0.85^{+0.35}_{-0.27}$ and an intrinsic scatter of $\sigma_{lnL_K|M} =0.37^{+0.19}_{-0.17}$. Combining our sample with some clusters in the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS) present in the literature, we obtain a slope of $1.05^{+0.16}_{-0.14}$ and an intrinsic scatter of $0.14^{+0.09}_{-0.07}$. The flattening in the $L_K-M$ seen in previous works is not seen here and might be a result of a bias in the mass measurement due to assumptions on the dynamical state of the systems. We also study the richness-mass relation and find that group-sized halos have more galaxies per unit halo mass than massive clusters. However, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in low-mass systems contributes a greater fraction to the total cluster light than BCGs do in massive clusters; the luminosity gap between the two brightest galaxies is more prominent for group-sized halos. This result is a natural outcome of the hierarchical growth of structures, where massive galaxies form and gain mass within low-mass groups and are ultimately accreted into more massive clusters to become either part of the BCG or one of the brighter galaxies. [Abridged]
  • We present a catalogue containing the redshifts of 3,660 X-ray selected targets in the XXL southern field. The redshifts were obtained with the AAOmega spectrograph and 2dF fibre positioner on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The catalogue contains 1,515 broad line AGN, 528 stars, and redshifts for 41 out of the 49 brightest X-ray selected clusters in the XXL southern field.
  • Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. Aims. This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of $3\times 10^{-14}\,\mathrm{erg \,s^{-1}cm^{-2}}$ on the source flux within a 1$^{\prime}$ aperture. Methods. The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results. The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between $M_{500}=7\times 10^{13}$ and $3\times 10^{14} M_\odot$, mostly located between $z=0.1$ and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the predictions from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of $\sigma_8$ and/or $\Omega_m$ appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to $z\sim1$. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters.
  • We present the XXL Survey, the largest XMM programme totaling some 6.9 Ms to date and involving an international consortium of roughly 100 members. The XXL Survey covers two extragalactic areas of 25 deg2 each at a point-source sensitivity of ~ 5E-15 erg/sec/cm2 in the [0.5-2] keV band (completeness limit). The survey's main goals are to provide constraints on the dark energy equation of state from the space-time distribution of clusters of galaxies and to serve as a pathfinder for future, wide-area X-ray missions. We review science objectives, including cluster studies, AGN evolution, and large-scale structure, that are being conducted with the support of approximately 30 follow-up programmes. We describe the 542 XMM observations along with the associated multi-lambda and numerical simulation programmes. We give a detailed account of the X-ray processing steps and describe innovative tools being developed for the cosmological analysis. The paper provides a thorough evaluation of the X-ray data, including quality controls, photon statistics, exposure and background maps, and sky coverage. Source catalogue construction and multi-lambda associations are briefly described. This material will be the basis for the calculation of the cluster and AGN selection functions, critical elements of the cosmological and science analyses. The XXL multi-lambda data set will have a unique lasting legacy value for cosmological and extragalactic studies and will serve as a calibration resource for future dark energy studies with clusters and other X-ray selected sources. With the present article, we release the XMM XXL photon and smoothed images along with the corresponding exposure maps. The XMM XXL observation list (Table B.1) is available in electronic form at the CDS. The present paper is the first in a series reporting results of the XXL-XMM survey.
  • The XXL Survey is the largest homogeneous and contiguous survey carried out with XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields, it primarily investigates the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. Given its depth and sky coverage, XXL is particularly suited to systematically unveiling the clustering of X-ray clusters and to identifying superstructures in a homogeneous X-ray sample down to the typical mass scale of a local massive cluster. A friends-of-friends algorithm in three-dimensional physical space was run to identify large-scale structures. In this paper we report the discovery of the highest redshift supercluster of galaxies found in the XXL Survey. We describe the X-ray properties of the clusters members of the structure and the optical follow-up. The newly discovered supercluster is composed of six clusters of galaxies at a median redshift z around 0.43 and distributed across approximately 30 by 15 arc minutes (10 by 5 Mpc on sky) on the sky. This structure is very compact with all the clusters residing in one XMM pointing; for this reason this is the first supercluster discovered with the XXL Survey. Spectroscopic follow-up with WHT (William Herschel Telescope) and NTT (New Technology Telescope) confirmed a median redshift of z = 0.43. An estimate of the X-ray mass and luminosity of this supercluster and of its total gas mass put XLSSC-e at the average mass range of superclusters; its appearance, with two members of equal size, is quite unusual with respect to other superclusters and provides a unique view of the formation process of a massive structure.
  • Traditionally, galaxy clusters have been expected to retain all the material accreted since their formation epoch. For this reason, their matter content should be representative of the Universe as a whole, and thus their baryon fraction should be close to the Universal baryon fraction. We make use of the sample of the 100 brightest galaxy clusters discovered in the XXL Survey to investigate the fraction of baryons in the form of hot gas and stars in the cluster population. We measure the gas masses of the detected halos and use a mass--temperature relation directly calibrated using weak-lensing measurements for a subset of XXL clusters to estimate the halo mass. We find that the weak-lensing calibrated gas fraction of XXL-100-GC clusters is substantially lower than was found in previous studies using hydrostatic masses. Our best-fit relation between gas fraction and mass reads $f_{\rm gas,500}=0.055_{-0.006}^{+0.007}\left(M_{\rm 500}/10^{14}M_\odot\right)^{0.21_{-0.10}^{+0.11}}$. The baryon budget of galaxy clusters therefore falls short of the Universal baryon fraction by about a factor of two at $r_{\rm 500}$. Our measurements require a hydrostatic bias $1-b=M_X/M_{\rm WL}=0.72_{-0.07}^{+0.08}$ to match the gas fraction obtained using lensing and hydrostatic equilibrium. Comparing our gas fraction measurements with the expectations from numerical simulations, our results favour an extreme feedback scheme in which a significant fraction of the baryons are expelled from the cores of halos. This model is, however, in contrast with the thermodynamical properties of observed halos, which might suggest that weak-lensing masses are overestimated. We note that a mass bias $1-b=0.58$ as required to reconcile Planck CMB and cluster counts should translate into an even lower baryon fraction, which poses a major challenge to our current understanding of galaxy clusters. [Abridged]
  • The XXL Survey is the largest homogeneous survey carried out with XMM-Newton. Covering an area of 50 deg$^{2}$, the survey contains several hundred galaxy clusters out to a redshift of $\approx$2 above an X-ray flux limit of $\sim$5$\times10^{-15}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. This paper belongs to the first series of XXL papers focusing on the bright cluster sample. We investigate the luminosity-temperature (LT) relation for the brightest clusters detected in the XXL Survey, taking fully into account the selection biases. We investigate the form of the LT relation, placing constraints on its evolution. We have classified the 100 brightest clusters in the XXL Survey based on their measured X-ray flux. These 100 clusters have been analysed to determine their luminosity and temperature to evaluate the LT relation. We used three methods to fit the LT relation, with two of these methods providing a prescription to fully take into account the selection effects of the survey. We measure the evolution of the LT relation internally using the broad redshift range of the sample. Taking into account selection effects, we find a slope of the bolometric LT relation of B$_{\rm LT}=3.08\pm$0.15, steeper than the self-similar expectation (B$_{\rm LT}$=2). Our best-fit result for the evolution factor is $E(z)^{1.64\pm0.77}$, consistent with "strong self-similar" evolution where clusters scale self-similarly with both mass and redshift. However, this result is marginally stronger than "weak self-similar" evolution, where clusters scale with redshift alone. We investigate the sensitivity of our results to the assumptions made in our model, finding that using an external LT relation as a low-z baseline can have a profound effect on the measured evolution. However, more clusters are needed to break the degeneracy between the choice of likelihood model and mass-temperature relation on the derived evolution.
  • The angular power spectrum of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect is highly sensitive to cosmological parameters such as sigma_8 and Omega_m, but its use as a precision cosmological probe is hindered by the astrophysical uncertainties in modeling the gas pressure profile in galaxy groups and clusters. In this paper we assume that the relevant cosmological parameters are accurately known and explore the ability of current and future tSZ power spectrum measurements to constrain the intracluster gas pressure or the evolution of the gas mass fraction, f_gas. We use the CMB bandpower measurements from the South Pole Telescope and a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to quantify deviations from the standard, universal gas pressure model. We explore analytical model extensions that bring the predictions for the tSZ power into agreement with experimental data. We find that a steeper pressure profile in the cluster outskirts or an evolving f_gas have mild-to-severe conflicts with experimental data or simulations. Varying more than one parameter in the pressure model leads to strong degeneracies that cannot be broken with current observational constraints. We use simulated bandpowers from future tSZ survey experiments, in particular a possible 2000 deg^2 CCAT survey, to show that future observations can provide almost an order of magnitude better precision on the same model parameters. This will allow us to break the current parameter degeneracies and place simultaneous constraints on the gas pressure profile and its redshift evolution, for example.