• The local Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC5135, thanks to its almost face-on appearance, a bulge overdensity of stars, the presence of a large-scale bar, an AGN and a Supernova Remnant, is an excellent target to investigate the dynamics of inflows, outflows, star formation and AGN feedback. Here we present a reconstruction of the gas morphology and kinematics in the inner regions of this galaxy, based on the analysis of Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) archival data. To our purpose, we combine the available $\sim$100 pc resolution ALMA 1.3 and 0.45 mm observations of dust continuum emission, the spectroscopic maps of two transitions of the CO molecule (tracer of molecular mass in star forming and nuclear regions), and of the CS molecule (tracer of the dense star forming regions) with the outcome of the SED decomposition. By applying the $^{\rm 3D}$BAROLO software (3D-Based Analysis of Rotating Object via Line Observations), we have been able to fit the galaxy rotation curves reconstructing a 3D tilted-ring model of the disk. Most of the observed emitting features are described by our kinematic model. We also attempt an interpretation for the emission in few regions that the axisymmetric model fails to reproduce. The most relevant of these is a region at the northern edge of the inner bar, where multiple velocity components overlap, as a possible consequence of the expansion of a super-bubble.
  • We present a detailed analysis of the X-ray and molecular gas emission in the nearby galaxy NGC 34, to constrain the properties of molecular gas, and assess whether, and to what extent, the radiation produced by the accretion onto the central black hole affects the CO line emission. We analyse the CO Spectral Line Energy Distribution (SLED) as resulting mainly from Herschel and ALMA data, along with X-ray data from NuSTAR and XMM-Newton. The X-ray data analysis suggests the presence of a heavily obscured AGN with an intrinsic luminosity of L$_{\rm{1-100\,keV}} \simeq 4.0\times10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$. ALMA high resolution data ($\theta \simeq 0.2''$) allows us to scan the nuclear region down to a spatial scale of $\approx 100$ pc for the CO(6-5) transition. We model the observed SLED using Photo-Dissociation Region (PDR), X-ray-Dominated Region (XDR), and shock models, finding that a combination of a PDR and an XDR provides the best fit to the observations. The PDR component, characterized by gas density ${\rm log}(n/{\rm cm^{-3}})=2.5$ and temperature $T=30$ K, reproduces the low-J CO line luminosities. The XDR is instead characterised by a denser and warmer gas (${\rm log}(n/{\rm cm^{-3}})=4.5$, $T =65$ K), and is necessary to fit the high-J transitions. The addition of a third component to account for the presence of shocks has been also tested but does not improve the fit of the CO SLED. We conclude that the AGN contribution is significant in heating the molecular gas in NGC 34.
  • The mid-infrared (IR) range contains many spectral features associated with large molecules and dust grains such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and silicates. These are usually very strong compared to fine-structure gas lines, and thus valuable in studying the spectral properties of faint distant galaxies. In this paper, we evaluate the capability of low-resolution mid-IR spectroscopic surveys of galaxies that could be performed by SPICA. The surveys are designed to address the question how star formation and black hole accretion activities evolved over cosmic time through spectral diagnostics of the physical conditions of the interstellar/circumnuclear media in galaxies. On the basis of results obtained with Herschel far-IR photometric surveys of distant galaxies and Spitzer and AKARI near- to mid-IR spectroscopic observations of nearby galaxies, we estimate the numbers of the galaxies at redshift z > 0.5, which are expected to be detected in the PAH features or dust continuum by a wide (10 deg^2) or deep (1 deg^2) blind survey, both for a given observation time of 600 hours. As by-products of the wide blind survey, we also expect to detect debris disks, through the mid-IR excess above the photospheric emission of nearby main-sequence stars, and we estimate their number. We demonstrate that the SPICA mid-IR surveys will efficiently provide us with unprecedentedly large spectral samples, which can be studied further in the far-IR with SPICA.
  • Our current knowledge of star formation and accretion luminosity at high-redshift (z>3-4), as well as the possible connections between them, relies mostly on observations in the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), which are strongly affected by dust obscuration. Due to the lack of sensitivity of past and current infrared (IR) instrumentation, so far it has not been possible to get a glimpse into the early phases of the dust-obscured Universe. Among the next generation of IR observatories, SPICA, observing in the 12-350 micron range, will be the only facility that can enable us to make the required leap forward in understanding the obscured star-formation rate and black-hole accretion rate densities (SFRD and BHARD, respectively) with respect to what Spitzer and Herschel achieved in the mid- and far-IR at z<3. In particular, SPICA will have the unique ability to trace the evolution of the obscured SFRD and BHARD over cosmic time, from the peak of their activity back to the reionisation epoch (i.e., 3<z<6-7), where its predecessors had severe limitations. Here we discuss the potential of both deep and shallow photometric surveys performed with the SPICA mid-IR instrument (SMI), enabled by the very low level of impact of dust obscuration in a band centred at 34 micron. These unique unbiased photometric surveys that SPICA will perform will be followed up by observations both with the SPICA spectrometers and with other facilities at shorter and longer wavelengths, with the aim to fully characterise the evolution of AGNs and star-forming galaxies after re-ionisation.
  • A far-infrared observatory such as the {\it SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics} ({\it SPICA}), with its unprecedented spectroscopic sensitivity, would unveil the role of feedback in galaxy evolution during the last $\sim10$ Gyr of the Universe ($z=1.5-2$), through the use of far- and mid-infrared molecular and ionic fine structure lines that trace outflowing and infalling gas. Outflowing gas is identified in the far-infrared through P-Cygni line shapes and absorption blueshifted wings in molecular lines with high dipolar moments, and through emission line wings of fine-structure lines of ionized gas. We quantify the detectability of galaxy-scale massive molecular and ionized outflows as a function of redshift in AGN-dominated, starburst-dominated, and main-sequence galaxies, explore the detectability of metal-rich inflows in the local Universe, and describe the most significant synergies with other current and future observatories that will measure feedback in galaxies via complementary tracers at other wavelengths.
  • IR spectroscopy in the range 12-230 micron with the SPace IR telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will reveal the physical processes that govern the formation and evolution of galaxies and black holes through cosmic time, bridging the gap between the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the new generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) at shorter wavelengths and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at longer wavelengths. SPICA, with its 2.5-m telescope actively-cooled to below 8K, will obtain the first spectroscopic determination, in the mid-IR rest-frame, of both the star-formation rate and black hole accretion rate histories of galaxies, reaching lookback times of 12 Gyr, for large statistically significant samples. Densities, temperatures, radiation fields and gas-phase metallicities will be measured in dust-obscured galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN), sampling a large range in mass and luminosity, from faint local dwarf galaxies to luminous quasars in the distant Universe. AGN and starburst feedback and feeding mechanisms in distant galaxies will be uncovered through detailed measurements of molecular and atomic line profiles. SPICA's large-area deep spectrophotometric surveys will provide mid-IR spectra and continuum fluxes for unbiased samples of tens of thousands of galaxies, out to redshifts of z~6. Furthermore, SPICA spectroscopy will uncover the most luminous galaxies in the first few hundred million years of the Universe, through their characteristic dust and molecular hydrogen features.
  • We present a coherent multi-band modelling of the CO Spectral Energy Distribution of the local Seyfert Galaxy NGC7130 to assess the impact of the AGN activity on the molecular gas. We take advantage of all the available data from X-ray to the sub-mm, including ALMA data. The high-resolution (~0.2") ALMA CO(6-5) data constrain the spatial extension of the CO emission down to ~70 pc scale. From the analysis of the archival CHANDRA and NuSTAR data, we infer the presence of a buried, Compton-thick AGN of moderate luminosity, L_2-10keV ~ 1.6x10^{43} ergs-1. We explore photodissociation and X-ray-dominated regions (PDRs and XDRs) models to reproduce the CO emission. We find that PDRs can reproduce the CO lines up to J~6, however, the higher rotational ladder requires the presence of a separate source of excitation. We consider X-ray heating by the AGN as a source of excitation, and find that it can reproduce the observed CO Spectral Energy Distribution. By adopting a composite PDR+XDR model, we derive molecular cloud properties. Our study clearly indicates the capabilities offered by current-generation of instruments to shed light on the properties of nearby galaxies adopting state-of-the art physical modelling.
  • The coeval AGN and galaxy evolution and the observed local relations between SMBHs and galaxy properties suggest some connection or feedback between SMBH growth and galaxy build-up. We looked for correlations between properties of X-ray detected AGN and their FIR detected host galaxies, to find quantitative evidences for this connection, highly debated in the latest years. We exploit the rich multi-wavelength data set available in the COSMOS field for a large sample (692 sources) of AGN and their hosts, in the redshift range $0.1<z<4$. We use X-ray data to select AGN and determine their properties (intrinsic luminosity and nuclear obscuration), and broad-band SED fitting to derive host galaxy properties (stellar mass $M_*$ and star formation rate SFR). We find that the AGN 2-10 keV luminosity ($L_{\rm X}$) and the host $8-1000~\mu m$ star formation luminosity ($L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$) are significantly correlated. However, the average host $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$ has a flat distribution in bins of AGN $L_{\rm X}$, while the average AGN $L_{\rm X}$ increases in bins of host $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$, with logarithmic slope of $\sim0.7$, in the redshifts range $0.4<z<1.2$. We also discuss the comparison between the distribution of these two quantities and the predictions from hydro-dynamical simulations. Finally we find that the average column density ($N_H$) shows a positive correlation with the host $M_*$, at all redshifts, but not with the SFR (or $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$). This translates into a negative correlation with specific SFR. Our results are in agreement with the idea that BH accretion and SF rates are correlated, but occur with different variability time scales. The presence of a positive correlation between $N_H$ and host $M_*$ suggests that the X-ray $N_H$ is not entirely due to the circum-nuclear obscuring torus, but may also include a contribution from the host galaxy.
  • We present the serendipitous ALMA detection of a faint submillimeter galaxy (SMG) lensed by a foreground z~1 galaxy. By optimizing the source detection to deblend the system, we accurately build the full spectral energy distribution of the distant galaxy from the I814 band to radio wavelengths. It is extremely red, with a I-K colour larger than 2.5. We estimate a photometric redshift of 3.28 and determine the physical parameters. The distant galaxy turns out to be magnified by the foreground lens by a factor of ~1.5, which implies an intrinsic Ks-band magnitude of ~24.5, a submillimeter flux at 870um of ~2.5 mJy and a SFR of ~150-300Msun/yr, depending on the adopted tracer. These values place our source towards the faint end of the distribution of observed SMGs, and in particular among the still few faint SMGs with a fully characterized spectral energy distribution, which allows us not only to accurately estimate its redshift but also to measure its stellar mass and other physical properties. The galaxy studied in this work is a representative of the population of faint SMGs, of which only few objects are known to date, that are undetected in optical and therefore are not typically accounted for when measuring the cosmic star formation history (SFH). This faint galaxy population thus likely represents an important and missing piece in our understanding of the cosmic SFH. Its observation and characterization is of major importance to achieve a solid picture of galaxy evolution.
  • The survival of dust grains in galaxies depends on various processes. Dust can be produced in stars, it can grow in the interstellar medium and be destroyed by astration and interstellar shocks. In this paper, we assemble a few data samples of local and distant star-forming galaxies to analyse various dust-related quantities in low and high redshift galaxies, to study how the relations linking the dust mass to the stellar mass and star formation rate evolve with redshift. We interpret the available data by means of chemical evolution models for discs and proto-spheroid (PSPH) starburst galaxies. In particular, we focus on the dust-to-stellar mass (DTS) ratio, as this quantity represents a true measure of how much dust per unit stellar mass survives the various destruction processes in galaxies and is observable. The theoretical models outline the strong dependence of this quantity on the underlying star formation history. Spiral galaxies are characterised by a nearly constant DTS as a function of the stellar mass and cosmic time, whereas PSPHs present an early steep increase of the DTS, which stops at a maximal value and decreases in the latest stages. In their late starburst phase, these models show a decrease of the DTS with their mass, which allows us to explain the observed anti-correlation between the DTS and the stellar mass. The observed redshift evolution of the DTS ratio shows an increase from z~0 to z~1, followed by a roughly constant behaviour at 1<z<2.5. Our models indicate a steep decrease of the global DTS at early times, which implies an expected decrease of the DTS at larger redshift.
  • We present new estimates of AGN accretion and star-formation luminosity in galaxies obtained for the local 12-$\mu$m sample of Seyfert galaxies (12MGS), by performing a detailed broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) decomposition including the emission of stars, dust heated by star formation and a possible AGN dusty torus. Thanks to the availability of data from the X-rays to the sub-millimetre, we constrain and test the contribution of the stellar, AGN and star-formation components to the SEDs. The availability of Spitzer-IRS low resolution mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra is crucial to constrain the dusty torus component at its peak wavelengths. The results of SED-fitting are also tested against the available information in other bands: the reconstructed AGN bolometric luminosity is compared to those derived from X-rays and from the high excitation IR lines tracing AGN activity like [Ne V] and [O IV]. The IR luminosity due to star-formation (SF) and the intrinsic AGN bolometric luminosity are shown to be strongly related to the IR line luminosity. Variations of these relations with different AGN fractions are investigated, showing that the relation dispersions are mainly due to different AGN relative contribution within the galaxy. Extrapolating these local relations between line and SF or AGN luminosities to higher redshifts, by means of recent Herschel galaxy evolution results, we then obtain mid- and far-IR line luminosity functions useful to estimate how many star-forming galaxies and AGN we expect to detect in the different lines at different redshifts and luminosities with future IR facilities (e.g., JWST, SPICA).
  • Using data from four deep fields (COSMOS, AEGIS, ECDFS, and CDFN), we study the correlation between the position of galaxies in the star formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass plane and local environment at $z<1.1$. To accurately estimate the galaxy SFR, we use the deepest available Spitzer/MIPS 24 and Herschel/PACS datasets. We distinguish group environments ( $M_{halo}\sim$10$^{12.5-14.2}$$M_{\odot}$) based on the available deep X-ray data and lower halo mass environments based on the local galaxy density. We confirm that the Main Sequence (MS) of star forming galaxies is not a linear relation and there is a flattening towards higher stellar masses ( $M_*>10^{10.4-10.6}$ $M_{\odot}$), across all environments. At high redshift ( $0.5<z<1.1$ ), the MS varies little with environment. At low redshift ( $0.15<z<0.5$ ), group galaxies tend to deviate from the mean MS towards the region of quiescence with respect to isolated galaxies and less-dense environments. We find that the flattening of the MS toward low SFR is due to an increased fraction of bulge dominated galaxies at high masses. Instead, the deviation of group galaxies from the MS at low redshift is caused by a large fraction of red disk dominated galaxies which are not present in the lower density environments. Our results suggest that above a mass threshold ( $\sim10^{10.4}-10^{10.6}$$M_{\odot}$ ) stellar mass, morphology and environment act together in driving the evolution of the SF activity towards lower level. The presence of a dominating bulge and the associated quenching processes are already in place beyond $z\sim$1. The environmental effects appear, instead, at lower redshifts and have a long time-scale.
  • We derive the CO luminosity function (LF) for different rotational transitions (i.e. (1-0), (3-2), (5-4)) starting from the Herschel LF by Gruppioni et al. and using appropriate $L'_{\rm CO} - L_{\rm IR}$ conversions for different galaxy classes. Our predicted LFs fit the data so far available at $z\approx0$ and $2$. We compare our results with those obtained by semi-analytical models (SAMs): while we find a good agreement over the whole range of luminosities at $z\approx0$, at $z\approx1$ and $z\approx2$ the tension between our LFs and SAMs in the faint and bright ends increases. We finally discuss the contribution of luminous AGN ($L_{X}>10^{44}\,\rm{erg\,s^{-1}}$) to the bright end of the CO LF concluding that they are too rare to reproduce the actual CO luminosity function at $z\approx2$.
  • We use a spectroscopic sample of 286 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 1<z<3 from the GMASS survey to study different star formation rate (SFR) estimators. Infrared (IR) data are used to derive empirical calibrations to correct ultraviolet (UV) and [OII]{\lambda}3727 luminosities for dust extinction and dust-corrected estimates of SFR. In the selection procedure we fully exploit the available spectroscopic information. On the basis of three continuum indices, we are able to identify and exclude from the sample galaxies in which old stellar populations might bring a non-negligible contribution to IR luminosity (LIR) and continuum reddening. Using Spitzer-MIPS and Herschel-PACS data we derive LIR for two-thirds of our sample. The LIR/LUV ratio is used as a probe of effective attenuation (AIRX) to search for correlations with continuum and spectroscopic features. The relation between AIRX and UV continuum slope ({\beta}) was tested for our sample and found to be broadly consistent with the literature results at the same redshift, though with a larger dispersion with respect to UV-selected samples. We find a correlation between the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) of the [OII]{\lambda}3727 line and {\beta}, which is the main result of this work. We therefore propose the [OII]{\lambda}3727 line EW as a dust attenuation probe and calibrate it through AIRX, though the assumption of a reddening curve is still needed to derive the actual attenuation towards the [OII]{\lambda}3727 line. We tested the issue of differential attenuation towards stellar continuum and nebular emission: our results are in line with the traditional prescription of extra attenuation towards nebular lines. A set of relations is provided that allows the recovery of the total unattenuated SFR from UV and [OII]{\lambda}3727 luminosities. (Abridged)
  • We present predictions for number counts and redshift distributions of galaxies detectable in continuum and in emission lines with the Mid-infrared (MIR) Instrument (SMI) proposed for the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). We have considered 24 MIR fine-structure lines, four Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) bands (at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3$\mu$m) and two silicate bands (in emission and in absorption) at 9.7$\mu$m and 18.0$\mu$m. Six of these lines are primarily associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), the others with star formation. A survey with the SMI spectrometers of 1 hour integration per field-of-view (FoV) over an area of $1\,\hbox{deg}^2$ will yield $5\,\sigma$ detections of $\simeq 140$ AGN lines and of $\simeq 5.2\times10^{4}$ star-forming galaxies, $\simeq 1.6\times10^{4}$ of which will be detected in at least two lines. The combination of a shallow ($20.0\,\hbox{deg}^{2}$, $1.4\times10^{-1}$ h integration per FoV) and a deep survey ($6.9\times10^{-3}\,\hbox{deg}^{2}$, $635$ h integration time), with the SMI camera, for a total of $\sim$1000 h, will accurately determine the MIR number counts of galaxies and of AGNs over five orders of magnitude in flux density, reaching values more than one order of magnitude fainter than the deepest Spitzer $24\,\mu$m surveys. This will allow us to determine the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) function down to SFRs more than 100 times fainter than reached by the Herschel Observatory.
  • We present a direct comparison between the observed star formation rate functions (SFRF) and the state-of-the-art predictions of semi-analytic models (SAM) of galaxy formation and evolution. We use the PACS Evolutionary Probe Survey (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) data-sets in the COSMOS and GOODS-South fields, combined with broad-band photometry from UV to sub-mm, to obtain total (IR+UV) instantaneous star formation rates (SFRs) for individual Herschel galaxies up to z~4, subtracted of possible active galactic nucleus (AGN) contamination. The comparison with model predictions shows that SAMs broadly reproduce the observed SFRFs up to z~2, when the observational errors on the SFR are taken into account. However, all the models seem to under-predict the bright-end of the SFRF at z>2. The cause of this underprediction could lie in an improper modelling of several model ingredients, like too strong (AGN or stellar) feedback in the brighter objects or too low fall-back of gas, caused by weak feedback and outflows at earlier epochs.
  • Highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN) are common in nearby galaxies, but are difficult to observe beyond the local Universe, where they are expected to significantly contribute to the black hole accretion rate density. Furthermore, Compton-thick (CT) absorbers (NH>10^24 cm^-2) suppress even the hard X-ray (2-10 keV) AGN nuclear emission, and therefore the column density distribution above 10^24 cm^-2 is largely unknown. We present the identification and multi-wavelength properties of a heavily obscured (NH>~10^25 cm^-2), intrinsically luminous (L(2-10keV)>10^44 erg s^-1) AGN at z=0.353 in the COSMOS field. Several independent indicators, such as the shape of the X-ray spectrum, the decomposition of the spectral energy distribution and X-ray/[NeV] and X-ray/6{\mu}m luminosity ratios, agree on the fact that the nuclear emission must be suppressed by a 10^25 cm^-2 column density. The host galaxy properties show that this highly obscured AGN is hosted in a massive star-forming galaxy, showing a barred morphology, which is known to correlate with the presence of CT absorbers. Finally, asymmetric and blueshifted components in several optical high-ionization emission lines indicate the presence of a galactic outflow, possibly driven by the intense AGN activity (L(Bol)/L(Edd) = 0.3-0.5). Such highly obscured, highly accreting AGN are intrinsically very rare at low redshift, whereas they are expected to be much more common at the peak of the star formation and BH accretion history, at z~2-3. We demonstrate that a fully multi-wavelength approach can recover a sizable sample of such peculiar sources in large and deep surveys such as COSMOS.
  • We study the relation of AGN accretion, star formation rate (SFR), and stellar mass (M$_*$) using a sample of $\approx$ 8600 star-forming galaxies up to z=2.5 selected with \textit{Herschel} imaging in the GOODS and COSMOS fields. For each of them we derive SFR and M$_*$, both corrected, when necessary, for emission from an active galactic nucleus (AGN), through the decomposition of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). About 10 per cent of the sample are detected individually in \textit{Chandra} observations of the fields. For the rest of the sample we stack the X-ray maps to get average X-ray properties. After subtracting the X-ray luminosity expected from star formation and correcting for nuclear obscuration, we derive the average AGN accretion rate for both detected sources and stacks, as a function of M$_{*}$, SFR and redshift. The average accretion rate correlates with SFR and with M$_*$. The dependence on SFR becomes progressively more significant at z$>$0.8. This may suggest that SFR is the original driver of these correlations. We find that average AGN accretion and star formation increase in a similar fashion with offset from the star-forming "main-sequence". Our interpretation is that accretion onto the central black hole and star formation broadly trace each other, irrespective of whether the galaxy is evolving steadily on the main-sequence or bursting.
  • We investigate the co-evolution of black-hole-accretion-rate (BHAR) and star-formation-rate (SFR) in $1.5<z<2.5$ galaxies displaying a greater diversity of star-forming properties compared to previous studies. We combine X-ray stacking and far-IR photometry of stellar mass-limited samples of normal star-forming, starburst and quiescent/quenched galaxies in the COSMOS field. We corroborate the existence of a strong correlation between BHAR (i.e. the X-ray luminosity, L_X), and stellar mass (M*) for normal star-forming galaxies, although find a steeper relation than previously reported. We find that starbursts show a factor of 3 enhancement in BHAR compared to normal SF galaxies (against a factor of 6 excess in SFR), while quiescents show a deficit of a factor 5.5 at a given mass. One possible interpretation of this is that the starburst phase does not coincide with cosmologically relevant BH growth, or that starburst-inducing mergers are more efficient at boosting SFR than BHAR. Contrary to studies based on smaller samples, we find the BHAR/SFR ratio of main sequence (MS) galaxies is not mass invariant, but scales weakly as M*^(0.43\pm0.09}, implying faster BH growth in more massive galaxies at $z\sim2$. Furthermore, BHAR/SFR during the starburst is a factor of 2 lower than in MS galaxies, at odds with the predictions of hydrodynamical simulations of merger galaxies that foresee a sudden enhancement of L_X/SFR during the merger. Finally, we estimate that the bulk of the accretion density of the Universe at $z\sim2$ is associated with normal star-forming systems, with only 6(+/-1)% and 11(+/-1)% associated with starburst and quiescent galaxies, respectively.
  • Heavily obscured, Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^24 cm^-2) AGN may represent an important phase in AGN/galaxy co-evolution and are expected to provide a significant contribution to the cosmic X-ray background (CXB). Through direct X-ray spectra analysis, we selected 39 heavily obscured AGN (NH>3x10^23 cm^-2) in the 2 deg^2 XMM-COSMOS survey. After selecting CT AGN based on the fit of a simple absorbed two power law model to the XMM data, the presence of CT AGN was confirmed in 80% of the sources using deeper Chandra data and more complex models. The final sample of CT AGN comprises 10 sources spanning a large range of redshift and luminosity. We collected the multi-wavelength information available for all these sources, in order to study the distribution of SMBH and host properties, such as BH mass (M_BH), Eddington ratio (\lambda_Edd), stellar mass (M*), specific star formation rate (sSFR) in comparison with a sample of unobscured AGN. We find that highly obscured sources tend to have significantly smaller M_BH and higher \lambda_edd with respect to unobscured ones, while a weaker evolution in M* is observed. The sSFR of highly obscured sources is consistent with the one observed in the main sequence of star forming galaxies, at all redshift. We also present optical spectra, spectral energy distribution (SED) and morphology for the sample of 10 CT AGN: all the available optical spectra are dominated by the stellar component of the host galaxy, and a highly obscured torus component is needed in the SED of the CT sources. Exploiting the high resolution Hubble-ACS images available, we conclude that these highly obscured sources have a significantly larger merger fraction with respect to other X-ray selected samples of AGN. Finally we discuss implications in the context of AGN/galaxy co-evolutionary models, and compare our results with the predictions of CXB synthesis models.
  • The most striking feature of the Cosmic Star Formation History (CSFH) of the Universe is a dramatic drop of the star formation (SF) activity, since z~1. In this work we investigate if the very same process of assembly and growth of structures is one of the major drivers of the observed decline. We study the contribution to the CSFH of galaxies in halos of different masses. This is done by studying the total SFR-halo mass-redshift plane from redshift 0 to redshift z~1.6 in a sample of 57 groups and clusters by using the deepest available mid- and far-infrared surveys conducted with Spitzer MIPS and Herschel PACS and SPIRE. Our results show that low mass groups provide a 60-80% contribution to the CSFH at z~1. Such contribution declines faster than the CSFH in the last 8 billion years to less than 10% at z<0.3, where the overall SF activity is sustained by lower mass halos. More massive systems provide only a marginal contribution (<10%) at any epoch. A simplified abundance matching method shows that the large contribution of low mass groups at z~1 is due to a large fraction (>50%) of very massive, highly star forming Main Sequence galaxies. Below z~1 a quenching process must take place in massive halos to cause the observed faster suppression of their SF activity. Such process must be a slow one though, as most of the models implementing a rapid quenching of the SF activity in accreting satellites significantly underpredicts the observed SF level in massive halos at any redshift. Starvation or the transition from cold to hot accretion would provide a quenching timescale of 1 Gyrs more consistent with the observations. Our results suggest a scenario in which, due to the structure formation process, more and more galaxies experience the group environment and, thus, the associated quenching process. This leads to the progressive suppression of their SF activity shaping the CSFH below z~1.
  • There is now a large consensus that the current epoch of the Cosmic Star Formation History (CSFH) is dominated by low mass galaxies while the most active phase at 1<z<2 is dominated by more massive galaxies, which undergo a faster evolution. Massive galaxies tend to inhabit very massive halos such as galaxy groups and clusters. We aim to understand whether the observed "galaxy downsizing" could be interpreted as a "halo downsizing", whereas the most massive halos, and their galaxy populations, evolve more rapidly than the halos of lower mass. Thus, we study the contribution to the CSFH of galaxies inhabiting group-sized halos. This is done through the study of the evolution of the Infra-Red (IR) luminosity function of group galaxies from redshift 0 to ~1.6. We use a sample of 39 X-ray selected groups in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN), and the COSMOS field, where the deepest available mid- and far-IR surveys have been conducted with Spitzer MIPS and Hersche PACS. Groups at low redshift lack the brightest, rarest, and most star forming IR-emitting galaxies observed in the field. Their IR-emitting galaxies contribute <10% of the comoving volume density of the whole IR galaxy population in the local Universe. At redshift >~1, the most IR-luminous galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) are preferentially located in groups, and this is consistent with a reversal of the star-formation rate vs .density anti-correlation observed in the nearby Universe. At these redshifts, group galaxies contribute 60-80% of the CSFH, i.e. much more than at lower redshifts. Below z~1, the comoving number and SFR densities of IR-emitting galaxies in groups decline significantly faster than those of all IR-emitting galaxies. Our results are consistent with a "halo downsizing" scenario and highlight the significant role of "environment" quenching in shaping the CSFH.
  • [Abridged] We study the evolution of the radio spectral index and far-infrared/radio correlation (FRC) across the star-formation rate-stellar masse (i.e. SFR-M*) plane up to z 2. We start from a M*-selected sample of galaxies with reliable SFR and redshift estimates. We then grid the SFR-M* plane in several redshift ranges and measure the infrared luminosity, radio luminosity, radio spectral index, and ultimately the FRC index (i.e. qFIR) of each SFR-M*-z bin. The infrared luminosities of our SFR-M*-z bins are estimated using their stacked far-infrared flux densities inferred from observations obtained with Herschel. Their radio luminosities and radio spectral indices (i.e. alpha, where Snu nu^-alpha) are estimated using their stacked 1.4GHz and 610MHz flux densities from the VLA and GMRT, respectively. Our far-infrared and radio observations include the most widely studied blank extragalactic fields -GOODS-N/S, ECDFS, and COSMOS- covering a sky area of 2deg^2. Using this methodology, we constrain the radio spectral index and FRC index of star-forming galaxies with M*>10^10Msun and 0<z<2.3. We find that alpha^1.4GHz_610MHz does not evolve significantly with redshift or with the distance of a galaxy with respect to the main sequence (MS) of the SFR-M* plane (i.e. Delta_log(SSFR)_MS=log[SSFR(galaxy)/SSFR_MS(M*,z)]). Instead, star-forming galaxies have a radio spectral index consistent with a canonical value of 0.8, which suggests that their radio spectra are dominated by non-thermal optically thin synchrotron emission. We find that qFIR displays a moderate but statistically significant redshift evolution as qFIR(z)=(2.35+/-0.08)*(1+z)^(-0.12+/-0.04), consistent with some previous literature. Finally, we find no significant correlation between qFIR and Delta_log(SSFR)_MS, though a weak positive trend, as observed in one of our redshift bins, cannot be firmly ruled out using our dataset.
  • We study the evolution of the total star formation (SF) activity, total stellar mass and halo occupation distribution in massive halos by using one of the largest X-ray selected sample of galaxy groups with secure spectroscopic identification in the major blank field surveys (ECDFS, CDFN, COSMOS, AEGIS). We provide an accurate measurement of SFR for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies using very deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations. For undetected IR sources, we provide a well-calibrated SFR from SED fitting. We observe a clear evolution in the level of SF activity in galaxy groups. The total SF activity in the high redshift groups (0.5<z<1.1) is higher with respect to the low redshift (0.15<z<0.5) sample at any mass by 0.8+/-0.12 dex. A milder difference (0.35+/-0.1 dex) is observed between the low redshift bin and the groups at z~0. We show that the level of SF activity is declining more rapidly in the more massive halos than in the more common lower mass halos. We do not observe any evolution in the halo occupation distribution and total stellar mass- halo mass relations in groups. The picture emerging from our findings suggests that the galaxy population in the most massive systems is evolving faster than galaxies in lower mass halos, consistently with a "halo downsizing" scenario.
  • We present new estimates of redshift-dependent luminosity functions of IR lines detectable by SPICA/SAFARI and excited both by star formation and by AGN activity. The new estimates improve over previous work by using updated evolutionary models and dealing in a self consistent way with emission of galaxies as a whole, including both the starburst and the AGN component. New relationships between line and AGN bolometric luminosity have been derived and those between line and IR luminosities of the starburst component have been updated. These ingredients were used to work out predictions for the source counts in 11 mid/far-IR emission lines partially or entirely excited by AGN activity. We find that the statistics of the emission line detection of galaxies as a whole is mainly determined by the star formation rate, because of the rarity of bright AGNs. We also find that the slope of the line integral number counts is flatter than 2 implying that the number of detections at fixed observing time increases more by extending the survey area than by going deeper. We thus propose a wide spectroscopic survey of 1 hour integration per field-of-view over an area of 5 deg$^{2}$ to detect (at 5$\sigma$) $\sim$760 AGNs in [OIV]25.89$\mu$m $-$ the brightest AGN mid-infrared line $-$ out to $z\sim2$. Pointed observations of strongly lensed or hyper-luminous galaxies previously detected by large area surveys such as those by Herschel and by the SPT can provide key information on the galaxy-AGN co-evolution out to higher redshifts.