• Mn$_2$Au is an important antiferromagnetic (AF) material for spintronics applications. Due to its very high N\'eel temperature of about 1500 K, some of the basic properties are difficult to explore, such as the AF susceptibility and the exchange constants. Experimental determination of these properties is further complicated in thin films by unavoidable presence of uncompensated and quasiloose spins on antisites and at interfaces. Using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), we have measured the spin and orbital contribution to the susceptibility in the direction perpendicular to the in-plane magnetic moments of a Mn$_2$Au(001) film and in fields up to 8 T. By performing these measurements at a low temperature of 7 K and at room temperature, we were able to separate the loose spin contribution from the susceptibility of AF coupled spins. The value of the AF exchange constant obtained with this method for a 10 nm thick Mn$_2$Au(001) film equals to (24 $\pm$ 5) meV.
  • The magnetic properties of ferromagnetic thin films down to the nanoscale are ruled by the exchange stiffness, anisotropies and the effects of magnetic fields. As surfaces break inversion symmetry, an additional effective chiral exchange is omnipresent in any magnetic nanostructure. These so-called Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI) affect all inhomogeneous magnetic states either subtly or spectacularly. E.g., DMIs cause a chirality selection of the rotation sense and can fix the local rotation axis for the magnetization in domain walls (DW). But, they can stabilize also entirely different twisted magnetic structures. The chiral skyrmions a two-dimensional particle-like topological soliton is the ultimately smallest of these objects, which currently is targetted as a possible information carrier in novel spintronic devices. Observation and quantification of the chiral exchange effects provide for the salient point in understanding magnetic properties in ultrathin films and other nanostructures. An easy and reliable method to determine the DMI constant as materials parameter of asymmetric thin films is the crucial problem. Here, we put forth an experimental approach for the determination of the complete set of the micromagnetic parameters. Quasi-static Kerr microcopy observations of DW creep motion and equilibrium sizes of circular magnetic objects in combination with standard magnetometry are used to derive a consistent set of these materials parameters in polycrystalline ultrathin film systems, namely CrOx/Co/Pt stacks. The quantified micromagnetic model for these films identifies the circular magnetic objects, as seen by the optical microscopy, as ordinary bubble domains with homochiral walls. From micromagnetic calculations, the chiral skyrmions stabilized by the DMI in these films are shown to have diameters in the range 40-200nm, too small to be observed by optical microscopy.
  • Terahertz emission spectroscopy of ultrathin multilayers of magnetic and heavy metals has recently attracted much interest. This method not only provides fundamental insights into photoinduced spin transport and spin-orbit interaction at highest frequencies but has also paved the way to applications such as efficient and ultrabroadband emitters of terahertz electromagnetic radiation. So far, predominantly standard ferromagnetic materials have been exploited. Here, by introducing a suitable figure of merit, we systematically compare the strength of terahertz emission from X/Pt bilayers with X being a complex ferro-, ferri- and antiferromagnetic metal, that is, dysprosium cobalt (DyCo$_5$), gadolinium iron (Gd$_{24}$Fe$_{76}$), Magnetite (Fe$_3$O$_4$) and iron rhodium (FeRh). We find that the performance in terms of spin-current generation not only depends on the spin polarization of the magnet's conduction electrons but also on the specific interface conditions, thereby suggesting terahertz emission spectroscopy to be a highly surface-sensitive technique. In general, our results are relevant for all applications that rely on the optical generation of ultrafast spin currents in spintronic metallic multilayers.
  • Neutron Zeeman spatial beam-splitting is considered at reflection from magnetically noncollinear films. Two applications of Zeeman beam-splitting phenomenon in polarized neutron reflectometry are discussed. One is the construction of polarizing devices with high polarizing efficiency. Another one is the investigations of magnetically noncollinear films with low spin-flip probability. Experimental results are presented for illustration.
  • Results of experimental investigations of a neutron resonances width in planar waveguides using the time-of-flight reflectometer REMUR of the IBR-2 pulsed reactor are reported and comparison with theoretical calculations is presented. The intensity of the neutron microbeam emitted from the waveguide edge was registered as a function of the neutron wavelength and the incident beam angular divergence. The possible applications of this method for the investigations of layered nanostructures are discussed.
  • We present and apply a new method to measure directly weak magnetization in thin films. The polarization of a neutron beam channeling through a thin film structure is measured after exiting the structure edge as a microbeam. We have applied the method to a tri-layer thin film structure acting as a planar waveguide for polarized neutrons. The middle guiding layer is a rare earth based ferrimagnetic material TbCo5 with a low magnetization of about 20 mT. We demonstrate that the channeling method is more sensitive than the specular neutron reflection method.
  • We review different neutron methods which allow extracting directly the value of the magnetic induction in thick films: Larmor precession, Zeeman spatial beam-splitting and neutron spin resonance. Resulting parameters obtained by the neutron methods and standard magnetometry technique are presented and compared. The possibilities and specificities of the neutron methods are discussed.
  • Increasing the magnetic data recording density requires reducing the size of the individual memory elements of a recording layer as well as employing magnetic materials with temperature-dependent functionalities. Therefore, it is predicted that the near future of magnetic data storage technology involves a combination of energy-assisted recording on nanometer-scale magnetic media. We present the potential of heat-assisted magnetic recording on a patterned sample; a ferrimagnetic alloy composed of a rare earth and a transition metal, DyCo$_5$, which is grown on a hexagonal-ordered nanohole array membrane. The magnetization of the antidot array sample is out-of-plane oriented at room temperature and rotates towards in-plane upon heating above its spin-reorientation temperature (T$_R$) of ~350 K, just above room temperature. Upon cooling back to room temperature (below T$_R$), we observe a well-defined and unexpected in-plane magnetic domain configuration modulating with ~45 nm. We discuss the underlying mechanisms giving rise to this behavior by comparing the magnetic properties of the patterned sample with the ones of its extended thin film counterpart. Our results pave the way for novel applications of ferrimagnetic antidot arrays of superior functionality in magnetic nano-devices near room temperature.
  • X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements in Pr0.5Ca0.5CoO3 were performed at the Pr M4,5, Pr L3, and Ca L2,3 absorption edges as a function of temperature below 300 K. Ca spectra show no changes down to 10 K while a noticeable thermally dependent evolution takes place at the Pr edges across the metal-insulator transition. Spectral changes are analyzed by different methods, including multiple scattering simulations, which provide quantitative details on an electron loss at Pr 4f orbitals. We conclude that in the insulating phase a fraction [15(+5)%] of Pr3+ undergoes a further oxidation to adopt a hybridized configuration composed of an admixture of atomic-like 4f1 states (Pr4+) and f- symmetry states on the O 2p valence band (Pr3+L states) indicative of a strong 4f- 2p interaction.
  • We present a comprehensive study of the exchange bias effect in a model system. Through numerical analysis of the exchange bias and coercive fields as a function of the antiferromagnetic layer thickness we deduce the absolute value of the averaged anisotropy constant of the antiferromagnet. We show that the anisotropy of IrMn exhibits a finite size effect as a function of thickness. The interfacial spin disorder involved in the data analysis is further supported by the observation of the dual behavior of the interfacial uncompensated spins. Utilizing soft x-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry we have observed that the antiferromagnetic uncompensated spins are dominantly frozen with nearly no rotating spins due to the chemical intermixing, which correlates to the inferred mechanism for the exchange bias.
  • We report on the magnetic properties and the crystallographic structure of the cobalt nanowire arrays as a function of their nanoscale dimensions. X-ray diffraction measurements show the appearance of an in-plane HCP-Co phase for nanowires with 50 nm diameter, suggesting a partial reorientation of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy axis along the membrane plane with increasing pore diameter. No significant changes in the magnetic behavior of the nanowire system are observed with decreasing temperature, indicating that the effective magnetoelastic anisotropy does not play a dominant role in the remagnetization processes of individual nanowires. An enhancement of the total magnetic anisotropy is found at room temperature with a decreasing nanowire diameter-to-length ratio (d/L), a result that is quantitatively analyzed on the basis of a simplified shape anisotropy model.
  • An analytical solution is found for neutron reflection coefficients from magnetic mirrors with fan-like magnetization. The main feature of the reflection curves related to this type of magnetization is pointed out. The results of calculations for some parameters of the system are presented. Time parity and detailed balance violation in the model are discussed.
  • Positive exchange bias has been observed in the Ni$_{81}$Fe$_{19}$/Ir$_{20}$Mn$_{80}$ bilayer system via soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering. After field cooling of the system through the blocking temperature of the antiferromagnet, an initial conventional negative exchange bias is removed after training i. e. successive magnetization reversals, resulting in a positive exchange bias for a temperature range down to 30 K below the blocking temperature (450 K). This new manifestation of magnetic training is discussed in terms of metastable magnetic disorder at the magnetically frustrated interface during magnetization reversal.
  • We have employed Soft and Hard X-ray Resonant Magnetic Scattering and Polarised Neutron Diffraction to study the magnetic interface and the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state of the archetypal epitaxial Ni$_{81}$Fe$_{19}$(111)/CoO(111) exchange biased bilayer. The combination of these scattering tools provides unprecedented detailed insights into the still incomplete understanding of some key manifestations of the exchange bias effect. We show that the several orders of magnitude difference between the expected and measured value of exchange bias field is caused by an almost anisotropic in-plane orientation of antiferromagnetic domains. Irreversible changes of their configuration lead to a training effect. This is directly seen as a change in the magnetic half order Bragg peaks after magnetization reversal. A 30 nm size of antiferromagnetic domains is extracted from the width the (1/2 1/2 1/2) antiferromagnetic magnetic peak measured both by neutron and x-ray scattering. A reduced blocking temperature as compared to the measured antiferromagnetic ordering temperature clearly corresponds to the blocking of antiferromagnetic domains. Moreover, an excellent correlation between the size of the antiferromagnetic domains, exchange bias field and frozen-in spin ratio is found, providing a comprehensive understanding of the origin of exchange bias in epitaxial systems.
  • We have studied experimentally and theoretically the interaction of polarized neutrons with magnetic thin films and magnetic multilayers. In particular, we have analyzed the behavior of the critical edges for total external reflection in both cases. For a single film we have observed experimentally and theoretically a simple behavior: the critical edges remain fixed and the intensity varies according to the angle between the polarization axis and the magnetization vector inside the film. For the multilayer case we find that the critical edges for spin up and spin down polarized neutrons move towards each other as a function of the angle between the magnetization vectors in adjacent ferromagnetic films. Although the results for multilayers and single thick layers appear to be different, in fact the same spinor method explains both results. An interpretation of the critical edges behavior for the multilyers as a superposition of ferromagnetic and antifferomagnetic states is given.
  • Magnetic domain walls in thin films can be well analyzed using polarized neutron reflectometry. Well defined streaks in the off-specular spin-flip scattering maps are explained by neutron refraction at perpendicular N\'{e}el walls. The position of the streaks depends only on the magnetic induction within the domains, whereas the intensity of the off-specular magnetic scattering depends on the spin-flip probability at the domain walls and on the average size of the magnetic domains. This effect is fundamentally different and has to be clearly distinguished from diffuse scattering originating from the size distribution of magnetic domains. Polarized neutron reflectivity experiments were carried out using a $^3$He gas spin-filter with a analyzing power as high as 96% and a neutron transmission of approx 35%. Furthermore, the off-specular magnetic scattering was enhanced by using neutron resonance and neutron standing wave techniques.
  • The spin-density wave (SDW) state in thin chromium films is well known to be strongly affected by proximity effects from neighboring layers. To date the main attention has been given to effects arising from exchange interactions at interfaces. In the present work we report on combined neutron and synchrotron scattering studies of proximity effects in Cr/V films where the boundary condition is due to the hybridization of Cr with paramagnetic V at the interface. We find that the V/Cr interface has a strong and long-range effect on the polarization, period, and the N\'{e}el temperature of the SDW in rather thick Cr films. This unusually strong effect is unexpected and not predicted by theory.
  • We have carried out detailed experimental studies of the exchange bias effect of a series of CoO/Co(111) textured bilayers with different Co layer thickness, using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, SQUID magnetometry, polarized neutron reflectivity, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. All samples exhibit a pronounced asymmetry of the magnetic hysteresis at the first magnetization reversal as compared to the second reversal. Polarized neutron reflectivity measurements show that the first reversal occurs via nucleation and domain wall motion, while the second reversal is characterized by magnetization rotation. Off-specular diffuse spin-flip scattering indicates the existence of interfacial magnetic domains. All samples feature a small positive exchange bias just below the blocking temperature, followed by a dominating negative exchange bias field with decreasing temperature. For very thin Co-films the coexistence of ferromagnetic domains with parallel and perpendicular magnetization directions leads to a peculiar shape of the hysteresis with an extended plateau like region of almost zero magnetization.
  • We report on the use of the polarized $^3$He gas filter and neutron resonant enhancement techniques for the measurement of spin-polarized diffuse neutron scattering due to ferromagnetic domains. A CoO/Co exchange biased bilayer was grown on a Ti/Cu/$Al_2O_3$ neutron resonator template. The system is cooled in an applied magnetic field of $H_a=2000$ Oe through the N\'{e}el temperature of the antiferromagnet to 10 K where the applied magnetic field is swept as to measure the magnetic hysteresis loop. After the second magnetization reversal at the coercive field $H_{c2}=+ 230$ Oe, the system is supposed to approach the original magnetic configuration. In order to prove that this is not the case for our exchange biased bilayer, we have measured four off-specular maps I++, I+-, I-+, I-- at $H_a \approx + 370$ Oe, where the Co magnetic spins were mostly reversed. They show a striking behavior in the total reflection region: while the nonspin-flip scattering exhibits no diffuse reflectivity, the spin-flip scattering shows strong diffuse scattering at incident angles which satisfy the resonance conditions. Moreover the spin-flip off-specular part of the reflectivity is asymmetric. The I-+ intensity occurs at higher exit angles than the specularly reflected neutrons, and the I+- intensity is shifted to lower angles. Their intensities are noticeably different and there is a splitting of the resonance positions for the up and down neutron spins ($\alpha_{n} ^{+} \ne \alpha_{n} ^{-}$) . Additionally, a strong influence of the stray fields from magnetic domains to the resonance splitting is observed.