• We present the star formation rates (SFRs) of a sample of 109 galaxies with X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) with moderate to high X-ray luminosities (L(2-8keV)= 10^42-10^45 erg/s), at redshifts 1 < z < 4.7, that were selected to be faint or undetected in the Herschel bands. We combine our deep ALMA continuum observations with deblended 8-500{\mu}m photometry from Spitzer and Herschel, and use infrared (IR) SED fitting and AGN - star formation decomposition methods. The addition of the ALMA photometry results in an order of magnitude more X-ray AGN in our sample with a measured SFR (now 37%). The remaining 63% of the sources have SFR upper limits that are typically a factor of 2-10 times lower than the pre-ALMA constraints. With the improved constraints on the IR SEDs, we can now identify a mid-IR (MIR) AGN component in 50% of our sample, compared to only ~1% previously. We further explore the F870{\mu}m/F24{\mu}m-redshift plane as a tool for the identification of MIR emitting AGN, for three different samples representing AGN dominated, star formation dominated, and composite sources. We demonstrate that the F870{\mu}m/F24{\mu}m-redshift plane can successfully split between AGN and star formation dominated sources, and can be used as an AGN identification method.
  • The lack of a strong correlation between AGN X-ray luminosity ($L_X$; a proxy for AGN power) and the star formation rate (SFR) of their host galaxies has recently been attributed to stochastic AGN variability. Studies using population synthesis models have incorporated this by assuming a broad, universal (i.e. does not depend on the host galaxy properties) probability distribution for AGN specific X-ray luminosities (i.e. the ratio of $L_X$ to host stellar mass; a common proxy for Eddington ratio). However, recent studies have demonstrated that this universal Eddington ratio distribution fails to reproduce the observed X-ray luminosity functions beyond z$\sim$1.2. Furthermore, empirical studies have recently shown that the Eddington ratio distribution may instead depend upon host galaxy properties, such as SFR and/or stellar mass. To investigate this further we develop a population synthesis model in which the Eddington ratio distribution is different for star-forming and quiescent host galaxies. We show that, although this model is able to reproduce the observed X-ray luminosity functions out to z$\sim$2, it fails to simultaneously reproduce the observed flat relationship between SFR and X-ray luminosity. We can solve this, however, by incorporating a mass dependency in the AGN Eddington ratio distribution for star-forming host galaxies. Overall, our models indicate that a relative suppression of low Eddington ratios ($\lambda_{\rm Edd}\lesssim$0.1) in lower mass galaxies (M<$10^{10-11}$Msun) is required to reproduce both the observed X-ray luminosity functions and the observed flat SFR/X-ray relationship.
  • We investigate the mean star formation rates (SFRs) in the host galaxies of ~3000 optically selected QSOs from the SDSS survey within the Herschel-ATLAS fields, and a radio-luminous sub-sample, covering the redshift range of z = 0.2-2.5. Using WISE & Herschel photometry (12 - 500{\mu}m) we construct composite SEDs in bins of redshift and AGN luminosity. We perform SED fitting to measure the mean infrared luminosity due to star formation, removing the contamination from AGN emission. We find that the mean SFRs show a weak positive trend with increasing AGN luminosity. However, we demonstrate that the observed trend could be due to an increase in black hole (BH) mass (and a consequent increase of inferred stellar mass) with increasing AGN luminosity. We compare to a sample of X-ray selected AGN and find that the two populations have consistent mean SFRs when matched in AGN luminosity and redshift. On the basis of the available virial BH masses, and the evolving BH mass to stellar mass relationship, we find that the mean SFRs of our QSO sample are consistent with those of main sequence star-forming galaxies. Similarly, the radio-luminous QSOs have mean SFRs that are consistent with both the overall QSO sample and with star-forming galaxies on the main sequence. In conclusion, on average QSOs reside on the main sequence of star-forming galaxies, and the observed positive trend between the mean SFRs and AGN luminosity can be attributed to BH mass and redshift dependencies.
  • NGC 1448 is one of the nearest luminous galaxies ($L_{8-1000\mu m} >$ 10$^{9} L_{\odot}$) to ours ($z$ $=$ 0.00390), and yet the active galactic nucleus (AGN) it hosts was only recently discovered, in 2009. In this paper, we present an analysis of the nuclear source across three wavebands: mid-infrared (MIR) continuum, optical, and X-rays. We observed the source with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), and combined this data with archival Chandra data to perform broadband X-ray spectral fitting ($\approx$0.5-40 keV) of the AGN for the first time. Our X-ray spectral analysis reveals that the AGN is buried under a Compton-thick (CT) column of obscuring gas along our line-of-sight, with a column density of $N_{\rm H}$(los) $\gtrsim$ 2.5 $\times$ 10$^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$. The best-fitting torus models measured an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of $L_{2-10\rm{,int}}$ $=$ (3.5-7.6) $\times$ 10$^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$, making NGC 1448 one of the lowest luminosity CTAGNs known. In addition to the NuSTAR observation, we also performed optical spectroscopy for the nucleus in this edge-on galaxy using the European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope. We re-classify the optical nuclear spectrum as a Seyfert on the basis of the Baldwin-Philips-Terlevich diagnostic diagrams, thus identifying the AGN at optical wavelengths for the first time. We also present high spatial resolution MIR observations of NGC 1448 with Gemini/T-ReCS, in which a compact nucleus is clearly detected. The absorption-corrected 2-10 keV luminosity measured from our X-ray spectral analysis agrees with that predicted from the optical [OIII]$\lambda$5007\AA\ emission line and the MIR 12$\mu$m continuum, further supporting the CT nature of the AGN.
  • Hot, Dust-Obscured Galaxies (Hot DOGs), selected from the WISE all sky infrared survey, host some of the most powerful Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) known, and might represent an important stage in the evolution of galaxies. Most known Hot DOGs are at $z> 1.5$, due in part to a strong bias against identifying them at lower redshift related to the selection criteria. We present a new selection method that identifies 153 Hot DOG candidates at $z\sim 1$, where they are significantly brighter and easier to study. We validate this approach by measuring a redshift $z=1.009$, and an SED similar to higher redshift Hot DOGs for one of these objects, WISE J1036+0449 ($L_{\rm\,Bol}\simeq 8\times 10^{46}\rm\,erg\,s^{-1}$), using data from Keck/LRIS and NIRSPEC, SDSS, and CSO. We find evidence of a broadened component in MgII, which, if due to the gravitational potential of the supermassive black hole, would imply a black hole mass of $M_{\rm\,BH}\simeq 2 \times 10^8 M_{\odot}$, and an Eddington ratio of $\lambda_{\rm\,Edd}\simeq 2.7$. WISE J1036+0449 is the first Hot DOG detected by NuSTAR, and the observations show that the source is heavily obscured, with a column density of $N_{\rm\,H}\simeq(2-15)\times10^{23}\rm\,cm^{-2}$. The source has an intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity of $\sim 6\times 10^{44}\rm\,erg\,s^{-1}$, a value significantly lower than that expected from the mid-infrared/X-ray correlation. We also find that the other Hot DOGs observed by X-ray facilities show a similar deficiency of X-ray flux. We discuss the origin of the X-ray weakness and the absorption properties of Hot DOGs. Hot DOGs at $z\lesssim1$ could be excellent laboratories to probe the characteristics of the accretion flow and of the X-ray emitting plasma at extreme values of the Eddington ratio.
  • We present a catalogue of nearly 3,000 submillimetre sources detected at 850um over ~5 square degrees surveyed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). This is the largest survey of its kind at 850um, probing a meaningful cosmic volume at the peak of star formation activity and increasing the sample size of submillimetre galaxies selected at 850um by an order of magnitude. We describe the wide 850um survey component of S2CLS, which covers the key extragalactic survey fields: UKIDSS-UDS, COSMOS, Akari-NEP, Extended Groth Strip, Lockman Hole North, SSA22 and GOODS-North. The average 1-sigma depth of S2CLS is 1.2 mJy/beam, approaching the SCUBA-2 850um confusion limit, which we determine to be ~0.8 mJy/beam. We measure the single dish 850um number counts to unprecedented accuracy, reducing the Poisson errors on the differential counts to approximately 4% at S_850~3mJy. With several independent fields, we investigate field-to-field variance, finding that the number counts on 0.5-1 degree scales are generally within 50% of the S2CLS mean for S_850>3mJy, with scatter consistent with the Poisson and estimated cosmic variance uncertainties, although there is a marginal (2-sigma) density enhancement in the GOODS-North field. The observed number counts are in reasonable agreement with recent phenomenological and semi-analytic models. Finally, the large solid angle of S2CLS allows us to measure the bright-end counts: at S_850>10mJy there are approximately ten sources per square degree, and we detect the distinctive up-turn in the number counts indicative of the detection of local sources of 850um emission and strongly lensed high-redshift galaxies. Here we describe the data collection and reduction procedures and present calibrated maps and a catalogue of sources; these are made publicly available.
  • We exploit ALMA 870um observations to measure the star-formation rates (SFRs) of eight X-ray detected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) in a z~3.1 protocluster, four of which reside in extended Ly-alpha haloes (often termed Ly-alpha blobs: LABs). Three of the AGNs are detected by ALMA and have implied SFRs of ~220-410~M_sun/yr; the non detection of the other five AGNs places SFR upper limits of <210 M_sun/yr. The mean SFR of the protocluster AGNs (~110-210 M_sun/yr) is consistent (within a factor of ~0.7-2.3) with that found for co-eval AGNs in the field, implying that galaxy growth is not significantly accelerated in these systems. However, when also considering ALMA data from the literature, we find evidence for elevated mean SFRs (up-to a factor of ~5.9 over the field) for AGNs at the protocluster core, indicating that galaxy growth is significantly accelerated in the central regions of the protocluster. We also show that all of the four protocluster LABs are associated with an ALMA counterpart within the extent of their Ly-alpha emission. The SFRs of the ALMA sources within the LABs (~150-410 M_sun/yr) are consistent with those expected for co-eval massive star-forming galaxies in the field. Furthermore, the two giant LABs (with physical extents of >100 kpc) do not host more luminous star formation than the smaller LABs, despite being an order of magnitude brighter in Ly-alpha emission. We use these results to discuss star formation as the power source of LABs.
  • We present high resolution (0.3") Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) 870um imaging of five z~1.5-4.5 X-ray detected AGN with luminosities of L(2-8keV)>10^42 erg/s. These data provide a >~20x improvement in spatial resolution over single-dish rest-frame FIR measurements. The sub-millimetre emission is extended on scales of FWHM~0.2"-0.5", corresponding to physical sizes of 1-3 kpc (median value of 1.8 kpc). These sizes are comparable to the majority of z=1-5 sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) with equivalent ALMA measurements. In combination with spectral energy distribution analyses, we attribute this rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) emission to dust heated by star formation. The implied star-formation rate surface densities are ~20-200 Mo/yr/kpc^2, which are consistent with SMGs of comparable FIR luminosities (i.e., L(IR)~[1-5]x10^(12)Lo). Although limited by a small sample of AGN, which all have high FIR luminosities, our study suggests that the kpc-scale spatial distribution and surface density of star formation in high-redshift star-forming galaxies is the same irrespective of the presence of X-ray detected AGN.
  • We present the infrared (IR) and X-ray properties of a sample of 33 mid-IR luminous quasars ($\nu$L(6 micron)>6x10$^{44}$ erg/s) at redshift z~1-3, identified through detailed spectral energy distribution analyses of distant star-forming galaxies, using the deepest IR data from Spitzer and Herschel in the GOODS-Herschel fields. The aim is to constrain the fraction of obscured, and Compton-thick (CT, N$_H$>1.5x10$^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$) quasars at the peak era of nuclear and star-formation activities. Despite being very bright in the mid-IR band, ~30% of these quasars are not detected in the extremely deep 2 Ms and 4 Ms Chandra X-ray data available in these fields. X-ray spectral analysis of the detected sources reveals that the majority (~67%) are obscured by column densities N$_H$>10$^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$; this fraction reaches ~80% when including the X-ray undetected sources (9 out of 33), which are likely to be the most heavily-obscured, CT quasars. We constrain the fraction of CT quasars in our sample to be ~24-48%, and their space density to be $\Phi$=(6.7$\pm$2.2)x10$^{-6}$ Mpc$^{-3}$. From the investigation of the quasar host galaxies in terms of star-formation rates (SFRs) and morphological distortions, as a sign of galaxy mergers/interactions, we do not find any direct relation between SFRs and quasar luminosity or X-ray obscuration. On the other hand, there is tentative evidence that the most heavily-obscured quasars have, on average, more disturbed morphologies than the unobscured/moderately-obscured quasar hosts, which preferentially live in undisturbed systems. However, the fraction of quasars with disturbed morphology amongst the whole sample is ~40%, suggesting that galaxy mergers are not the main fuelling mechanism of quasars at z~2.
  • Using deep Herschel and ALMA observations, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) distributions of X-ray selected AGN host galaxies at 0.5<z<1.5 and 1.5<z<4, comparing them to that of normal, star-forming (i.e., "main-sequence", or MS) galaxies. We find 34--55 per cent of AGNs in our sample have SFRs at least a factor of two below that of the average MS galaxy, compared to ~15 per cent of all MS galaxies, suggesting significantly different SFR distributions. Indeed, when both are modelled as log-normal distributions, the mass and redshift-normalised SFR distributions of X-ray AGNs are roughly twice as broad, and peak ~0.4 dex lower, than that of MS galaxies. However, like MS galaxies, the normalised SFR distribution of AGNs in our sample appears not to evolve with redshift. Despite X-ray AGNs and MS galaxies having different SFR distributions, the linear-mean SFR of AGNs derived from our distributions is remarkably consistent with that of MS galaxies, and thus with previous results derived from stacked Herschel data. This apparent contradiction is due to the linear-mean SFR being biased by bright outliers, and thus does not necessarily represent a true characterisation of the typical SFR of X-ray AGNs.
  • In this study we investigate the relationship between the star formation rate, SFR, and AGN luminosity, L(AGN), for ~2000 X-ray detected AGN. The AGN span over three orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity (10^(42) < L(2-8keV) < 10^(45.5) erg/s) and are in the redshift range z = 0.2 - 2.5. Using infrared (IR) photometry (8 - 500um), including deblended Spitzer and Herschel images and taking into account photometric upper limits, we decompose the IR spectral energy distributions into AGN and star formation components. Using the IR luminosities due to star formation, we investigate the average SFRs as a function of redshift and AGN luminosity. In agreement with previous studies, we find a strong evolution of the average SFR with redshift, tracking the observed evolution of the overall star forming galaxy population. However, we find that the relationship between the average SFR and AGN luminosity is flat at all redshifts and across all the AGN luminosities investigated; in comparison to previous studies, we find less scatter amongst the average SFRs across the wide range of AGN luminosities investigated. By comparing to empirical models, we argue that the observed flat relationship is due to short timescale variations in AGN luminosity, driven by changes in the mass accretion rate, which wash out any underlying correlations between SFR and L(AGN). Furthermore, we show that the exact form of the predicted relationship between SFR and AGN luminosity (and it's normalisation) is highly sensitive to the assumed intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution.