• In this paper we study the behavior of the Casimir energy of a "multi-cavity" across the transition from the metallic to the superconducting phase of the constituting plates. Our analysis is carried out in the framework of the ARCHIMEDES experiment, aiming at measuring the interaction of the electromagnetic vacuum energy with a gravitational field. For this purpose it is foreseen to modulate the Casimir energy of a layered structure composing a multi-cavity coupled system by inducing a transition from the metallic to the superconducting phase. This implies a thorough study of the behavior of the cavity, where normal metallic layers are alternated with superconducting layers, across the transition. Our study finds that, because of the coupling between the cavities, mainly mediated by the transverse magnetic modes of the radiation field, the variation of energy across the transition can be very large.
  • Superconducting hybrid junctions are revealing a variety of novel effects. Some of them are due to the special layout of these devices, which often use a coplanar configuration with relatively large barrier channels and the possibility of hosting Pearl vortices. A Josephson junction with a quasi ideal two-dimensional barrier has been realized by growing graphene on SiC with Al electrodes. Chemical Vapor Deposition offers centimeter size monolayer areas where it is possible to realize a comparative analysis of different devices with nominally the same barrier. In samples with a graphene gap below 400 nm, we have found evidence of Josephson coherence in presence of an incipient Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. When the magnetic field is cycled, a remarkable hysteretic collapse and revival of the Josephson supercurrent occurs. Similar hysteresis are found in granular systems and are usually justified within the Bean Critical State model (CSM). We show that the CSM, with appropriate account for the low dimensional geometry, can partly explain the odd features measured in these junctions.
  • Graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) has proved to be highly successful in Hall conductance quantization for its homogeneity at the centimetre scale. Robust Josephson coupling has been measured in co-planar diffusive Al/monololayer graphene/Al junctions. Graphene on SiC substrates is a concrete candidate to provide scalability of hybrid Josephson graphene/superconductor devices, giving also promise of ballistic propagation.
  • We have identified anomalous behavior of the escape rate out of the zero-voltage state in Josephson junctions with a high critical current density Jc. For this study we have employed YBa2Cu3O7-x grain boundary junctions, which span a wide range of Jc and have appropriate electrodynamical parameters. Such high Jc junctions, when hysteretic, do not switch from the superconducting to the normal state following the expected stochastic Josephson distribution, despite having standard Josephson properties such as a Fraunhofer magnetic field pattern. The switching current distributions (SCDs) are consistent with nonequilibrium dynamics taking place on a local rather than a global scale. This means that macroscopic quantum phenomena seem to be practically unattainable for high Jc junctions. We argue that SCDs are an accurate means to measure nonequilibrium effects. This transition from global to local dynamics is of relevance for all kinds of weak links, including the emergent family of nanohybrid Josephson junctions. Therefore caution should be applied in the use of such junctions in, for instance, the search for Majorana fermions.
  • The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F) is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We prove a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions which demonstrate a clear signature of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits.
  • In superconductor-topological insulator-superconductor hybrid junctions, the barrier edge states are expected to be protected against backscattering, to generate unconventional proximity effects, and, possibly, to signal the presence of Majorana fermions. The standards of proximity modes for these types of structures have to be settled for a neat identification of possible new entities. Through a systematic and complete set of measurements of the Josephson properties we find evidence of ballistic transport in coplanar Al-Bi2Se3-Al junctions that we attribute to a coherent transport through the topological edge state. The shunting effect of the bulk only influences the normal transport. This behavior, which can be considered to some extent universal, is fairly independent of the specific features of superconducting electrodes. A comparative study of Shubnikov - de Haas oscillations and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy gave an experimental signature compatible with a two dimensional electron transport channel with a Dirac dispersion relation. A reduction of the size of the Bi2Se3 flakes to the nanoscale is an unavoidable step to drive Josephson junctions in the proper regime to detect possible distinctive features of Majorana fermions.
  • Majorana Bound States are predicted to appear as boundary states of the Kitaev model. Here we show that a pi-Josephson Junction, inserted in a topologically non trivial model ring, sustains a Majorana Bound State, which is robust with respect to local and non local perturbations. The realistic structure could be based on a High Tc Superconductor tricrystal structure, similar to the one used to spot the d-wave order parameter. The presence of the Majorana Bound State changes the ground state of the topologically non trivial ring in a measurable way, with respect to that of a conventional one.
  • We report on the study of the phase dynamics of high critical temperature superconductor Josephson junctions. We realized YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-x}$ (YBCO) grain boundary (GB) biepitaxial junctions in the submicron scale, using low loss substrates, and analyzed their dissipation by comparing the transport measurements with Monte Carlo simulations. The behavior of the junctions can be fitted using a model based on two quality factors, which results in a frequency dependent damping. Moreover, our devices can be designed to have Josephson energy of the order of the Coulomb energy. In this unusual energy range, phase delocalization strongly influences the device's dynamics, promoting the transition to a quantum phase diffusion regime. We study the signatures of such a transition by combining the outcomes of Monte Carlo simulations with the analysis of the device's parameters, the critical current and the temperature behavior of the low voltage resistance $R_0$.
  • We propose an alternative platform to observe Majorana bound states in solid state systems. High critical temperature cuprate superconductors can induce superconductivity, by proximity effect, in quasi one dimensional nanowires with strong spin orbit coupling. They favor a wider and more robust range of conditions to stabilize Majorana fermions due to the large gap values, and offer novel functionalities in the design of the experiments determined by different dispersion for Andreev bound states as a function of the phase difference.
  • YBaCuO nanowires were reproducibly fabricated down to widths of 50 nm. A Au/Ti cap layer on YBCO yielded high electrical performance up to temperatures above 80 K in single nanowires. Critical current density of tens of MA/cm2 at T = 4.2 K and of 10 MA/cm2 at 77 K were achieved that survive in high magnetic fields. Phase-slip processes were tuned by choosing the size of the nanochannels and the intensity of the applied external magnetic field. Data indicate that YBCO nanowires are rather attractive system for the fabrication of efficient sensors, supporting the notion of futuristic THz devices.
  • The magneto-conductance in YBCO grain boundary Josephson junctions, displays fluctuations at low temperatures of mesoscopic origin. The morphology of the junction suggests that transport occurs in narrow channels across the grain boundary line, with a large Thouless energy. Nevertheless the measured fluctuation amplitude decreases quite slowly when increasing the voltage up to values about twenty times the Thouless energy, of the order of the nominal superconducting gap. Our findings show the coexistence of supercurrent and quasiparticle current in the junction conduction even at high nonequilibrium conditions. Model calculations confirm the reduced role of quasiparticle relaxation at temperatures up to 3 Kelvin.
  • Superconducting behavior has been observed in the Sr2RuO4-Sr3Ru2O7 eutectic system as grown by the flux-feeding floating zone technique. A supercurrent flows across a single interface between Sr2RuO4 and Sr3Ru2O7 areas at distances that are far beyond those expected in a conventional proximity scenario. The current-voltage characteristics within the Sr3Ru2O7 macrodomain, as extracted from the eutectic, exhibit signatures of superconductivity in the bilayered ruthenate. Detailed microstructural, morphological and compositional analyses address issues on the concentration and the size of Sr2RuO4 inclusions within the Sr3Ru2O7 matrix. We speculate on the possibility of inhomogeneous superconductivity in the eutectic Sr3Ru2O7 and exotic pairing induced by the Sr2RuO4 inclusions.
  • Magneto-fluctuations of the normal resistance RN have been reproducibly observed in YBa2Cu3O7-d biepitaxial grain boundary junctions at low temperatures. We attribute them to mesoscopic transport in narrow channels across the grain boundary line, occurring in an unusual energy regime. The Thouless energy appears to be the relevant energy scale. Possible implications on the understanding of coherent transport of quasiparticles in HTS and of the dissipation mechanisms are discussed.
  • Magneto-fluctuations of the normal resistance R_N have been reproducibly observed in high critical temp erature superconductor (HTS) grain boundary junctions, at low temperatures. We attribute them to mesoscopic transport in narrow channels across the grain boundary line. The Thouless energy appears to be the relevant energy scale. Our findings have significant implications on quasiparticle relaxation and coherent transport in HTS grain boundaries.
  • We have made current-voltage (IV) measurements of artificially layered high-$T_c$ thin-film bridges. Scanning SQUID microscopy of these films provides values for the Pearl lengths $\Lambda$ that exceed the bridge width, and shows that the current distributions are uniform across the bridges. At high temperatures and high currents the voltages follow the power law $V \propto I^n$, with $n=\Phi_0^2/8\pi^2\Lambda k_B T+1$, and at high temperatures and low-currents the resistance is exponential in temperature, in good agreement with the predictions for thermally activated vortex motion. At low temperatures, the IV's are better fit by $\ln V$ linear in $I^{-2}$. This is expected if the low temperature dissipation is dominated by quantum tunneling of Pearl vortices.
  • We have used scanning SQUID magnetometry to image vortices in ultra-thin [Ba$_{0.9}$Nd$_{0.1}$CuO$_{2+x}$]$_m$/[CaCuO$_2$]$_n$ (CBCO) high temperature superconductor samples, with as few as three superconducting CuO$_2$ planes. The Pearl lengths ($\Lambda = 2\lambda_{L}^2/d$, $\lambda_{L}$ the London penetration depth, $d$ the superconducting film thickness) in these samples, as determined by fits to the vortex images, agree with those by local susceptibility measurements, and can be as long as 1mm. The in-plane penetration depths $\lambda_{ab}$ inferred from the Pearl lengths are longer than many bulk cuprates with comparable critical temperatures. We speculate on the causes of the long penetration depths, and on the possibility of exploiting the unique properties of these superconductors for basic experiments.
  • A detailed investigation of the magnetic response of YBaCuO grain boundary Josephson junctions has been carried out using both radio-frequency measurements and Scanning SQUID Microscopy. In a nominally zero-field-cooled regime we observed a paramagnetic response at low external fields for 45 degree asymmetric grain boundaries. We argue that the observed phenomenology results from the d-wave order parameter symmetry and depends on Andreev bound states.
  • We show that low-angle grain boundaries (GB) in high-temperature superconductors exhibit intermediate Abrikosov vortices with Josephson cores, whose length $l$ along GB is smaller that the London penetration depth, but larger than the coherence length. We found an exact solution for a periodic vortex structure moving along GB in a magnetic field $H$ and calculated the flux flow resistivity $R_F(H)$, and the nonlinear voltage-current characteristics. The predicted $R_F(H)$ dependence describes well our experimental data on $7^{\circ}$ unirradiated and irradiated $YBa_2Cu_3O_7$ bicrystals, from which the core size $l(T)$, and the intrinsic depairing density $J_b(T)$ on nanoscales of few GB dislocations were measured for the first time. The observed temperature dependence of $J_b(T)=J_{b0}(1-T/T_c)^2$ indicates a significant order parameter suppression in current channels between GB dislocation cores.
  • We have observed spontaneous magnetic moments with random signs in c-axis oriented thin films of the high-Tc cuprate superconductor YBCO, imaged with a scanning SQUID microscope. These moments arise when the samples become superconducting, and appear to be associated with non-ferromagnetic defects in the films. In contrast with granular high-Tc samples, which also show spontaneous magnetization with random signs, these samples shield diamagnetically.