• The MuPix Telescope is a particle tracking telescope, optimized for tracking low momentum particles and high rates. It is based on the novel High-Voltage Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (HV-MAPS), designed for the Mu3e tracking detector. The telescope represents a first application of the HV-MAPS technology and also serves as test bed of the Mu3e readout chain. The telescope consists of up to eight layers of the newest prototypes, the MuPix7 sensors, which send data self-triggered via fast serial links to FPGAs, where the data is time-ordered and sent to the PC. A particle hit rate of 1 MHz per layer could be processed. Online tracking is performed with a subset of the incoming data. The general concept of the telescope, chip architecture, readout concept and online reconstruction are described. The performance of the sensor and of the telescope during test beam measurements are presented.
  • The MuPix7 chip is a monolithic HV-CMOS pixel chip, thinned down to 50 \mu m. It provides continuous self-triggered, non-shuttered readout at rates up to 30 Mhits/chip of 3x3 mm^2 active area and a pixel size of 103x80 \mu m^2. The hit efficiency depends on the chosen working point. Settings with a power consumption of 300 mW/cm^2 allow for a hit efficiency >99.5%. A time resolution of 14.2 ns (Gaussian sigma) is achieved. Latest results from 2016 test beam campaigns are shown.
  • Precision measurements at low energy search for physics beyond the Standard Model in a way complementary to searches for new particles at colliders. In the weak sector the most general $\beta$ decay Hamiltonian contains, besides vector and axial-vector terms, also scalar, tensor and pseudoscalar terms. Current limits on the scalar and tensor coupling constants from neutron and nuclear $\beta$ decay are on the level of several percent. The goal of this paper is extracting new information on tensor coupling constants by measuring the $\beta$-asymmetry parameter in the pure Gamow-Teller decay of $^{67}$Cu, thereby testing the V-A structure of the weak interaction. An iron sample foil into which the radioactive nuclei were implanted was cooled down to milliKelvin temperatures in a $^3$He-$^4$He dilution refrigerator. An external magnetic field of 0.1 T, in combination with the internal hyperfine magnetic field, oriented the nuclei. The anisotropic $\beta$ radiation was observed with planar high purity germanium detectors operating at a temperature of about 10\,K. An on-line measurement of the $\beta$ asymmetry of $^{68}$Cu was performed as well for normalization purposes. Systematic effects were investigated using Geant4 simulations. The experimental value, $\tilde{A}$ = 0.587(14), is in agreement with the Standard Model value of 0.5991(2) and is interpreted in terms of physics beyond the Standard Model. The limits obtained on possible tensor type charged currents in the weak interaction hamiltonian are -0.045 $< (C_T+C'_T)/C_A <$ 0.159 (90\% C.L.). The obtained limits are comparable to limits from other correlation measurements in nuclear $\beta$ decay and contribute to further constraining tensor coupling constants.
  • The central detector in the MuSun experiment is a pad-plane time projection ionization chamber that operates without gas amplification in deuterium at 31 K; it is used to measure the rate of the muon capture process $\mu^- + d \rightarrow n + n + \nu_\mu$. A new charge-sensitive preamplifier, operated at 140 K, has been developed for this detector. It achieved a resolution of 4.5 keV(D$_2$) or 120 $e^-$ RMS with zero detector capacitance at 1.1 $\mu$s integration time in laboratory tests. In the experimental environment, the electronic resolution is 10 keV(D$_2$) or 250 $e^-$ RMS at a 0.5 $\mu$s integration time. The excellent energy resolution of this amplifier has enabled discrimination between signals from muon-catalyzed fusion and muon capture on chemical impurities, which will precisely determine systematic corrections due to these processes. It is also expected to improve the muon tracking and determination of the stopping location.
  • Geant4 simulations play a crucial role in the analysis and interpretation of experiments providing low energy precision tests of the Standard Model. This paper focuses on the accuracy of the description of the electron processes in the energy range between 100 and 1000 keV. The effect of the different simulation parameters and multiple scattering models on the backscattering coefficients is investigated. Simulations of the response of HPGe and passivated implanted planar Si detectors to \beta{} particles are compared to experimental results. An overall good agreement is found between Geant4 simulations and experimental data.
  • The 6He nucleus is an ideal candidate to study the weak interaction. To this end we have built a high-intensity source of 6He delivering ~10^10 atoms/s to experiments. Taking full advantage of that available intensity we have performed a high-precision measurement of the 6He half-life that directly probes the axial part of the nuclear Hamiltonian. Currently, we are preparing a measurement of the beta-neutrino angular correlation in 6He beta decay that will allow to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model in the form of tensor currents.
  • A new value for the hyperfine magnetic field of copper impurities in iron is obtained by combining resonance frequencies from experiments involving {\beta}-NMR on oriented nuclei on 59-Cu, 69-Cu, and 71-Cu with magnetic moment values from collinear laser spectroscopy measurements on these isotopes. The resulting value, i.e., Bhf(CuFe) = -21.794(10) T, is in agreement with the value adopted until now but is an order of magnitude more precise. It is consistent with predictions from ab initio calculations. Comparing the hyperfine field values obtained for the individual isotopes, the hyperfine anomalies in Fe were determined to be 59{\Delta}69=0.15(9)% and 71{\Delta}69=0.07(11)%.
  • The half-life of the $\alpha$ decaying nucleus $^{221}$Fr was determined in different environments, i.e. embedded in Si at 4 K, and embedded in Au at 4 K and about 20 mK. No differences in half-life for these different conditions were observed within 0.1%. Furthermore, we quote a new value for the absolute half-life of $^{221}$Fr of t$_{1/2}$ = 286.1(10) s, which is of comparable precision to the most precise value available in literature.
  • The WITCH experiment (Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles) will search for exotic interactions by investigating the beta-neutrino angular correlation via the measurement of the recoil energy spectrum after beta decay. As a first step the recoil ions from the beta-minus decay of 124In stored in a Penning trap have been detected. The evidence for the detection of recoil ions is shown and the properties of the ion cloud that forms the radioactive source for the experiment in the Penning trap are presented.
  • Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR/ON) measurements with beta- and gamma-ray detection have been performed on oriented Ag-104(g,m) nuclei with the NICOLE He-3-He-4 dilution refrigerator setup at ISOLDE/CERN. For Ag-104(g) (I-pi = 5(+)) the gamma-NMR/ON resonance signal was found at nu = 266.70(5) MHz. Combining this result with the known magnetic moment for this isotope, the magnetic hyperfine field of Ag impurities in an Fe host at low temperature (< 1 K) is found to be vertical bar B-hf(AgFe)vertical bar = 44.709(35) T. A detailed analysis of other relevant data available in the literature yields three more values for this hyperfine field. Averaging all four values yields a new and precise value for the hyperfine field of Ag in Fe; that is, vertical bar B-hf(AgFe)vertical bar = 44.692(30) T. For Ag-104(m) (I-pi = 2(+)), the anisotropy of the beta particles provided the NMR/ON resonance signal at nu = 627.7(4) MHz. Using the new value for the hyperfine field of Ag in Fe, this frequency corresponds to the magnetic moment mu(Ag-104m) = +3.691(3) mu(N), which is significantly more precise than previous results. The magnetic moments of the even-A Ag102 -110 isotopes are discussed in view of the competition between the (pi g(9/2))(7/2+)(-3)(nu d(5/2)nu g(7/2))(5/2+) and the (pi g(9/2))(9/2+)(-3)(nu d(5/2)nu g(7/2))(5/2+) configurations. The magnetic moments of the ground and isomeric states of Ag-104 can be explained by an almost complete mixing of these two configurations.
  • The $\beta$-asymmetry parameter $\widetilde{A}$ for the Gamow-Teller decay of $^{60}$Co was measured by polarizing the radioactive nuclei with the brute force low-temperature nuclear-orientation method. The $^{60}$Co activity was cooled down to milliKelvin temperatures in a $^3$He-$^4$He dilution refrigerator in an external 13 T magnetic field. The $\beta$ particles were observed by a 500 ${\mu}m$ thick Si PIN diode operating at a temperature of about 10 K in a magnetic field of 0.6 T. Extensive GEANT4 Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to gain control over the systematic effects. Our result, $\widetilde{A} = -1.014(12)_{stat}(16)_{syst}$, is in agreement with the Standard-Model value of $-0.987(9)$, which includes recoil-order corrections that were addressed for the first time for this isotope. Further, it enables limits to be placed on possible tensor-type charged weak currents as well as other physics beyond the Standard Model.
  • The beta asymmetry parameter A for the pure Gamow-Teller decay of 114In is reported. The low temperature nuclear orientation method was combined with a GEANT4 based simulation code allowing for the first time to address in detail the effects of scattering and of the magnetic field. The result, A = -0.994 +/- 0.010stat +/- 0.010syst, constitutes the most accurate value for the asymmetry parameter of a nuclear beta transition to date. The value is in agreement with the Standard Model prediction of A = -1 and provides new limits on tensor type charged weak currents.
  • The measurement of the beta asymmetry parameter in nuclear beta decay is a potentially very sensitive tool to search for non V-A components in the charge-changing weak interaction. To reach the required precision (percent level) all effects that modify the emission pattern of the beta radiation, i.e. the geometry of the setup, the effect of the magnetic field on the trajectories of beta particles as well as (back)scattering in the source, on the sample holder and on the detector, have to be correctly taken into account in the analysis of the data. A thorough study of these effects and a new method based on detailed GEANT4 Monte-Carlo simulations that was developed for this purpose is presented here. The code was developed for beta asymmetry measurements by means of the Low Temperature Nuclear Orientation (LTNO) method, but can in principle be generalized to other experimental setups using other polarization techniques.
  • The performance of a Si PIN diode (type Hamamatsu S3590-06) as an energy sen- sitive detector operating at cryogenic temperatures (~10 K) and in magnetic fields up to 11 T was investigated, using a 207Bi conversion electron source. It was found that the detector still performs well under these conditions, with small changes in the response function being observed in high magnetic fields, e.g. a 30% to 50% decrease in energy resolution. A GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation showed that the observed effects are mainly due to the modified trajectories of the electrons due to the influence of the magnetic field, which changes the scattering conditions, rather than to intrinsic changes of the performance of the detector itself.
  • The standard model of the electroweak interaction describes beta-decay in the well-known V-A form. Nevertheless, the most general Hamiltonian of a beta-decay includes also other possible interaction types, e.g. scalar (S) and tensor (T) contributions, which are not fully ruled out yet experimentally. The WITCH experiment aims to study a possible admixture of these exotic interaction types in nuclear beta-decay by a precise measurement of the shape of the recoil ion energy spectrum. The experimental set-up couples a double Penning trap system and a retardation spectrometer. The set-up is installed in ISOLDE/CERN and was recently shown to be fully operational. The current status of the experiment is presented together with the data acquired during the 2006 campaign, showing the first recoil ion energy spectrum obtained. The data taking procedure and corresponding data acquisition system are described in more detail. Several further technical improvements are briefly reviewed.
  • Primary goal of the WITCH experiment is to test the Standard Model for a possible ad-mixture of a scalar or tensor type interaction in beta-decay. This information will be inferred from the shape of the recoil energy spectrum. The experimental set-up was completed and is under intensive commissioning at ISOLDE (CERN). It combines a Penning trap to store the ions and a retardation spectrometer to probe the recoil ion energy. A brief overview of the WITCH set-up and the results of commissioning tests performed until now are presented. Finally, perspectives of the physics program are reviewed.