• The palladium-iron-arsenides Ca10(Fe1-xPdxAs)10(Pd3As8) were synthesized by solid state methods and characterized by X-ray powder and single crystal diffraction. The triclinic crystal structure (space group P-1) is isotypic to the homologue platinum 1038 type superconductors with alternating FeAs4/4- and Pd3As8-layers, each separated by layers of calcium atoms. Iron is tetrahedral and palladium is planar coordinated by four arsenic atoms. As2-dimers (dAs-As = 250 pm) are present in the Pd3As8-layer. Even though each layer itself has a fourfold rotational symmetry, the shifted layer stacking causes the triclinic space group. Resistivity measurements of La-doped samples show the onset of superconductivity at 17 K and zero resistivity below 10 K. The magnetic shielding fraction is about 20 % at 3.5 K. 57Fe-M\"ossbauer spectra exhibit one absorption line and show no hint to magnetic ordering. The electronic structure is very similar to the known iron-arsenides with cylinder-like Fermi surfaces and partial nesting between hole- and electron-like sheets. Our results show that superconductivity in the palladium-iron-compounds is present but complicated by too high substitution of iron by palladium in the active FeAs-layers. Since the electronic preconditions are satisfied, we expect higher critical temperatures in Pd1038-compounds with lower or even without Pd-doping in the FeAs-layer.
  • We report the structural and magnetic phase transitions of triclinic Ca10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8). High-resolution X-ray powder diffraction reveals splitting of the in-plane (a,b) lattice parameters at Ts ~ 120 K. Platinum-doping weakens the distortion and shifts the transition temperature to 80 K in Ca10(Fe1-xPt_xAs)10(Pt3As8) with x = 0.03. muSR experiments show the onset of magnetic order near Ts and a broad magnetic phase transition. No symmetry breaking is associated to the structural transition in Ca10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8) in contrast to the other parent compounds of iron arsenide superconductors.
  • By introducing an additional operator into the action and using the Feynman-Hellmann theorem we describe a method to determine both the quark line connected and disconnected terms of matrix elements. As an illustration of the method we calculate the gluon contribution (chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic components) to the nucleon mass.
  • We present the first determination of charge symmetry violation (CSV) in the spin-dependent parton distribution functions of the nucleon. This is done by determining the first two Mellin moments of the spin-dependent parton distribution functions of the octet baryons from N_f = 2 + 1 lattice simulations. The results are compared with predictions from quark models of nucleon structure. We discuss the contribution of partonic spin CSV to the Bjorken sum rule, which is important because the CSV contributions represent the only partonic corrections to the Bjorken sum rule.
  • QCD lattice simulations determine hadron masses as functions of the quark masses. From the gradients of these masses and using the Feynman-Hellmann theorem the hadron sigma terms can then be determined. We use here a novel approach of keeping the singlet quark mass constant in our simulations which upon using an SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion gives highly constrained (i.e. few parameter) fits for hadron masses in a multiplet. This is a highly advantageous procedure for determining the hadron mass gradient as it avoids the use of delicate chiral perturbation theory. We illustrate the procedure here by estimating the light and strange sigma terms for the baryon octet.
  • QCD lattice simulations yield hadron masses as functions of the quark masses. From the gradients of the hadron masses the sigma terms can then be determined. We consider here dynamical 2+1 flavour simulations, in which we start from a point of the flavour symmetric line and then keep the singlet or average quark mass fixed as we approach the physical point. This leads to highly constrained fits for hadron masses in a multiplet. The gradient of this path for a hadron mass then gives a relation between the light and strange sigma terms. A further relation can be found from the change in the singlet quark mass along the flavour symmetric line. This enables light and strange sigma terms to be estimated for the baryon octet.
  • We calculate the disconnected contribution to the form factor for the semileptonic decay of a D-meson into a final state, containing a flavor singlet eta meson. We use QCDSF n_f=2+1 configurations at the flavor symmetric point m_u=m_d=m_s and the partially quenched approximation for the relativistic charm quark. Several acceleration and noise reduction techniques for the stochastic estimation of the disconnected loop are tested.
  • QCD lattice simulations with 2+1 flavours (when two quark flavours are mass degenerate) typically start at rather large up-down and strange quark masses and extrapolate first the strange quark mass and then the up-down quark mass to its respective physical value. Here we discuss an alternative method of tuning the quark masses, in which the singlet quark mass is kept fixed. Using group theory the possible quark mass polynomials for a Taylor expansion about the flavour symmetric line are found, first for the general 1+1+1 flavour case and then for the 2+1 flavour case. This ensures that the kaon always has mass less than the physical kaon mass. This method of tuning quark masses then enables highly constrained polynomial fits to be used in the extrapolation of hadron masses to their physical values. Numerical results for the 2+1 flavour case confirm the usefulness of this expansion and an extrapolation to the physical pion mass gives hadron mass values to within a few percent of their experimental values. Singlet quantities remain constant which allows the lattice spacing to be determined from hadron masses (without necessarily being at the physical point). Furthermore an extension of this programme to include partially quenched results is given.
  • We study the spectra of heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons containing charm quarks, including higher spin states. We use two sets of $N_f = 2 + 1$ gauge configurations, one set from QCDSF using the SLiNC action, and the other configurations from the Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal collaboration, using the HEX smeared clover action. To extract information about the excited states, we choose a suitable basis of operators to implement the variational method.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon from a lattice simulation with two flavors of dynamical O(a)-improved Wilson fermions. A key feature of our calculation is that we make use of an extensive ensemble of lattice gauge field configurations with four different lattice spacings, multiple volumes, and pion masses down to m_\pi ~ 180 MeV. We find that by employing Kelly-inspired parametrizations for the Q^2-dependence of the form factors, we are able to obtain stable fits over our complete ensemble. Dirac and Pauli radii and the anomalous magnetic moments of the nucleon are extracted and results at light quark masses provide evidence for chiral non-analytic behavior in these fundamental observables.
  • By determining the quark momentum fractions of the octet baryons from N_f=2+1 lattice simulations, we are able to predict the degree of charge symmetry violation in the parton distribution functions of the nucleon. This is of importance, not only as a probe of our understanding of the non-perturbative structure of the proton but also because such a violation constrains the accuracy of global fits to parton distribution functions and hence the accuracy with which, for example, cross sections at the LHC can be predicted. A violation of charge symmetry may also be critical in cases where symmetries are used to guide the search for physics beyond the Standard Model.
  • QPACE is a novel massively parallel architecture optimized for lattice QCD simulations. A single QPACE node is based on the IBM PowerXCell 8i processor. The nodes are interconnected by a custom 3-dimensional torus network implemented on an FPGA. The compute power of the processor is provided by 8 Synergistic Processing Units. Making efficient use of these accelerator cores in scientific applications is challenging. In this paper we describe our strategies for porting applications to the QPACE architecture and report on performance numbers.
  • We report on recent results of the QCDSF/UKQCD Collaboration on investigations of baryon structure using configurations generated with N_f=2+1 dynamical flavours of O(a) improved Wilson fermions. With the strange quark mass as an additional dynamical degree of freedom in our simulations we avoid the need for a partially quenched approximation when investigating the properties of particles containing a strange quark, e.g. the hyperons. In particular, we will focus on the nucleon and hyperon axial charges and quark momentum fractions.
  • We present results from the QCDSF/UKQCD collaboration for the electromagnetic and semi-leptonic form factors for the hyperons. The simulations are performed on our new ensembles generated with 2+1 flavours of dynamical O(a)-improved Wilson fermions. A unique feature of these configurations is that the quark masses are tuned so that the singlet quark mass is held fixed at its physical value. We use 5 such choices of the individual quark masses on 24^3x48 lattices with a lattice spacing of about 0.078 fm.
  • We give an update on our ongoing efforts to compute the nucleon's form factors and moments of structure functions using Nf=2 flavours of non-perturbatively improved Clover fermions. We focus on new results obtained on gauge configurations where the pseudo-scalar meson mass is in the range of 170-270 MeV. We will compare our results with various estimates obtained from chiral effective theories since we have some overlap with the quark mass region where results from such theories are believed to be applicable.
  • QCD lattice simulations with 2+1 flavours typically start at rather large up-down and strange quark masses and extrapolate first the strange quark mass to its physical value and then the up-down quark mass. An alternative method of tuning the quark masses is discussed here in which the singlet quark mass is kept fixed, which ensures that the kaon always has mass less than the physical kaon mass. Using group theory the possible quark mass polynomials for a Taylor expansion about the flavour symmetric line are found, which enables highly constrained fits to be used in the extrapolation of hadrons to the physical pion mass. Numerical results confirm the usefulness of this expansion and an extrapolation to the physical pion mass gives hadron mass values to within a few percent of their experimental values.
  • QPACE is a novel parallel computer which has been developed to be primarily used for lattice QCD simulations. The compute power is provided by the IBM PowerXCell 8i processor, an enhanced version of the Cell processor that is used in the Playstation 3. The QPACE nodes are interconnected by a custom, application optimized 3-dimensional torus network implemented on an FPGA. To achieve the very high packaging density of 26 TFlops per rack a new water cooling concept has been developed and successfully realized. In this paper we give an overview of the architecture and highlight some important technical details of the system. Furthermore, we provide initial performance results and report on the installation of 8 QPACE racks providing an aggregate peak performance of 200 TFlops.
  • We give an overview of the QPACE project, which is pursuing the development of a massively parallel, scalable supercomputer for LQCD. The machine is a three-dimensional torus of identical processing nodes, based on the PowerXCell 8i processor. The nodes are connected by an FPGA-based, application-optimized network processor attached to the PowerXCell 8i processor. We present a performance analysis of lattice QCD codes on QPACE and corresponding hardware benchmarks.