• We summarize panchromatic Extragalactic Background Light data to place upper limits on the integrated near-infrared surface brightness (SB) that may come from Population III stars and possible accretion disks around their stellar-mass black holes (BHs) in the epoch of First Light, broadly taken from z$\simeq$7-17. Theoretical predictions and recent near-infrared power-spectra provide tighter constraints on their sky-signal. We outline the physical properties of zero metallicity Population III stars from MESA stellar evolution models through helium-depletion and of BH accretion disks at z$\gtrsim$7. We assume that second-generation non-zero metallicity stars can form at higher multiplicity, so that BH accretion disks may be fed by Roche-lobe overflow from lower-mass companions. We use these near-infrared SB constraints to calculate the number of caustic transits behind lensing clusters that the James Webb Space Telescope and the next generation ground-based telescopes may observe for both Population III stars and their BH accretion disks. Typical caustic magnifications can be $\mu$$\simeq$10$^4$-10$^5$, with rise times of hours and decline times of $\lesssim$1 year for cluster transverse velocities of $v_{T}$$\lesssim$1000 km s$^{-1}$. Microlensing by intracluster medium objects can modify transit magnifications, but lengthen visibility times. Depending on BH masses, accretion-disk radii and feeding efficiencies, stellar-mass BH accretion-disk caustic transits could outnumber those from Population III stars. To observe Population III caustic transits directly may require to monitor 3-30 lensing clusters to AB$\lesssim$29 mag over a decade.
  • We update the capabilities of the software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) and enhance its ease of use and availability. Our new approach to locating convective boundaries is consistent with the physics of convection, and yields reliable values of the convective core mass during both hydrogen and helium burning phases. Stars with $M<8\,{\rm M_\odot}$ become white dwarfs and cool to the point where the electrons are degenerate and the ions are strongly coupled, a realm now available to study with MESA due to improved treatments of element diffusion, latent heat release, and blending of equations of state. Studies of the final fates of massive stars are extended in MESA by our addition of an approximate Riemann solver that captures shocks and conserves energy to high accuracy during dynamic epochs. We also introduce a 1D capability for modeling the effects of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities that, in combination with the coupling to a public version of the STELLA radiation transfer instrument, creates new avenues for exploring Type II supernovae properties. These capabilities are exhibited with exploratory models of pair-instability supernova, pulsational pair-instability supernova, and the formation of stellar mass black holes. The applicability of MESA is now widened by the capability of importing multi-dimensional hydrodynamic models into MESA. We close by introducing software modules for handling floating point exceptions and stellar model optimization, and four new software tools -- MESAWeb, MESA-Docker, pyMESA, and mesastar.org -- to enhance MESA's education and research impact.
  • We explore properties of core-collapse supernova progenitors with respect to the composite uncertainties in the thermonuclear reaction rates by coupling the reaction rate probability density functions provided by the STARLIB reaction rate library with $\texttt{MESA}$ stellar models. We evolve 1000 15 $M_{\odot}$ models from the pre main-sequence to core O-depletion at solar and subsolar metallicities for a total of 2000 Monte Carlo stellar models. For each stellar model, we independently and simultaneously sample 665 thermonuclear reaction rates and use them in a $\texttt{MESA}$ in situ reaction network that follows 127 isotopes from $^{1}$H to $^{64}$Zn. With this framework we survey the core mass, burning lifetime, composition, and structural properties at five different evolutionary epochs. At each epoch we measure the probability distribution function of the variations of each property and calculate Spearman Rank-Order Correlation coefficients for each sampled reaction rate to identify which reaction rate has the largest impact on the variations on each property. We find that uncertainties in $^{14}$N$(p,\gamma)^{15}$O, triple-$\alpha$, $^{12}$C$(\alpha,\gamma)^{16}$O, $^{12}$C($^{12}$C,$p$)$^{23}$Na, $^{12}$C($^{16}$O,$p$)$^{27}$Al, $^{16}$O($^{16}$O,$n$)$^{31}$S, $^{16}$O($^{16}$O,$p$)$^{31}$P, and $^{16}$O($^{16}$O,$\alpha$)$^{28}$Si reaction rates dominate the variations of the properties surveyed. We find that variations induced by uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates grow with each passing phase of evolution, and at core H-, He-depletion are of comparable magnitude to the variations induced by choices of mass resolution and network resolution. However, at core C-, Ne-, and O-depletion, the reaction rate uncertainties can dominate the variation causing uncertainty in various properties of the stellar model in the evolution towards iron core-collapse.
  • We present a new calculation of the neutrino flux received at Earth from a massive star in the $\sim 24$ hours of evolution prior to its explosion as a supernova (presupernova). Using the stellar evolution code MESA, the neutrino emissivity in each flavor is calculated at many radial zones and time steps. In addition to thermal processes, neutrino production via beta processes is modeled in detail, using a network of 204 isotopes. We find that the total produced $\nu_{e}$ flux has a high energy spectrum tail, at $E \gtrsim 3 - 4$ MeV, which is mostly due to decay and electron capture on isotopes with $A = 50 - 60$. In a tentative window of observability of $E \gtrsim 0.5$ MeV and $t < 2$ hours pre-collapse, the contribution of beta processes to the $\nu_{e}$ flux is at the level of $\sim90\%$ . For a star at $D=1$ kpc distance, a 17 kt liquid scintillator detector would typically observe several tens of events from a presupernova, of which up to $\sim 30\%$ due to beta processes. These processes dominate the signal at a liquid argon detector, thus greatly enhancing its sensitivity to a presupernova.
  • The physical process whereby a carbon--oxygen white dwarf explodes as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) remains highly uncertain. The degree of neutronization in SN Ia ejecta holds clues to this process because it depends on the mass and the metallicity of the stellar progenitor, and on the thermodynamic history prior to the explosion. We report on a new method to determine ejecta neutronization using Ca and S lines in the X-ray spectra of Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs). Applying this method to \textit{Suzaku} data of Tycho, Kepler, 3C 397 and G337.2$-$0.7 in the Milky Way, and N103B in the Large Magellanic Cloud, we find that the neutronization of the ejecta in N103B is comparable to that of Tycho and Kepler, which suggests that progenitor metallicity is not the only source of neutronization in SNe Ia. We then use a grid of SN Ia explosion models to infer the metallicities of the stellar progenitors of our SNRs. The implied metallicities of 3C 397, G337.2$-$0.7, and N103B are major outliers compared to the local stellar metallicity distribution functions, indicating that progenitor metallicity can be ruled out as the origin of neutronization for these SNRs. Although the relationship between ejecta neutronization and equivalent progenitor metallicity is subject to uncertainties stemming from the $^{12}$C$\,$+$^{16}$O reaction rate, which affects the Ca/S mass ratio, our main results are not sensitive to these details.
  • It has been proposed that mixing induced by convective overshoot can disrupt the inward propagation of carbon deflagrations in super-asymptotic giant branch stars. To test this theory, we study an idealized model of convectively bounded carbon flames with 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the Boussinesq equations using the pseudospectral code Dedalus. Because the flame propagation timescale is much longer than the convection timescale, we approximate the flame as fixed in space, and only consider its effects on the buoyancy of the fluid. By evolving a passive scalar field, we derive a {\it turbulent} chemical diffusivity produced by the convection as a function of height, $D_{\rm t}(z)$. Convection can stall a flame if the chemical mixing timescale, set by the turbulent chemical diffusivity, $D_{\rm t}$, is shorter than the flame propagation timescale, set by the thermal diffusivity, $\kappa$, i.e., when $D_{\rm t}>\kappa$. However, we find $D_{\rm t}<\kappa$ for most of the flame because convective plumes are not dense enough to penetrate into the flame. Extrapolating to realistic stellar conditions, this implies that convective mixing cannot stall a carbon flame and that "hybrid carbon-oxygen-neon" white dwarfs are not a typical product of stellar evolution.
  • Computational skills are required across all astronomy disciplines. Many students enter degree programs without sufficient skills to solve computational problems in their core classes or contribute immediately to research. We recommend advocacy for computational literacy, familiarity with fundamental software carpentry skills, and mastery of basic numerical methods by the completion of an undergraduate degree in Astronomy. We recommend the AAS Education Task Force advocate for a significant increase in computational literacy. We encourage the AAS to modestly fund efforts aimed at providing Open Education Resources (OER) that will significantly impact computational literacy in astronomy education.
  • We refine our previously introduced parameterized model for explosive carbon-oxygen fusion during thermonuclear supernovae (SN Ia) by adding corrections to post-processing of recorded Lagrangian fluid element histories to obtain more accurate isotopic yields. Deflagration and detonation products are verified for propagation in a uniform density medium. A new method is introduced for reconstructing the temperature-density history within the artificially thick model deflagration front. We obtain better than 5\% consistency between the electron capture computed by the burning model and yields from post-processing. For detonations, we compare to a benchmark calculation of the structure of driven steady-state planar detonations performed with a large nuclear reaction network and error-controlled integration. We verify that, for steady-state planar detonations down to a density of 5x10^6 g/cc, our post processing matches the major abundances in the benchmark solution typically to better than 10% for times greater than 0.01 s after the shock front passage. As a test case to demonstrate the method, presented here with post-processing for the first time, we perform a two dimensional simulation of a SN Ia in the Chandrasekhar-mass deflagration-detonation transition (DDT) scenario. We find that reconstruction of deflagration tracks leads to slightly more complete silicon burning than without reconstruction. The resulting abundance structure of the ejecta is consistent with inferences from spectroscopic studies of observed SNe Ia. We confirm the absence of a central region of stable Fe-group material for the multi-dimensional DDT scenario. Detailed isotopic yields are tabulated and only change modestly when using deflagration reconstruction.
  • In Type Ia Supernovae (\sneia), the relative abundances of chemical elements are affected by the neutron excess in the composition of the progenitor white dwarf. Since these products leave signatures in the spectra near maximum light, spectral features may be used to constrain the composition of the progenitor. We calculate the nucleosynthetic yields for three \snia simulations, assuming single degenerate, Chandrasekhar mass progenitors, for a wide range of progenitor metallicities, and calculate synthetic light curves and spectra to explore correlations between progenitor metallicity and the strength of spectral features. We use two 2D simulations of the deflagration-detonation-transition scenario with different $^{56}$Ni yields and the W7 simulation to control for differences between explosion models and total yields. While the overall yields of intermediate mass elements (16 $<$ A $\leq$ 40) differ between the three cases, trends in the yields are similar. With increasing metallicity, $^{28}$Si yields remain nearly constant, $^{40}$Ca yields decline, and Ti and $^{54}$Fe yields increase. In the synthetic spectra, we identify two features at 30 days post explosion that appear to deepen with progenitor metallicity: a Ti feature around 4200\,\AA\ and a Fe feature around 5200\,\AA\@. In all three simulations, their pseudo equivalent widths show a systematic trend with progenitor metallicity. This suggests that these two features may allow differentiation among progenitor metallicities of observed \sneia and potentially help reduce the intrinsic Hubble scatter.
  • We investigate properties of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs with respect to the composite uncertainties in the reaction rates using the stellar evolution toolkit, Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) and the probability density functions in the reaction rate library STARLIB. These are the first Monte Carlo stellar evolution studies that use complete stellar models. Focusing on 3 M$_{\odot}$ models evolved from the pre main-sequence to the first thermal pulse, we survey the remnant core mass, composition, and structure properties as a function of 26 STARLIB reaction rates covering hydrogen and helium burning using a Principal Component Analysis and Spearman Rank-Order Correlation. Relative to the arithmetic mean value, we find the width of the 95\% confidence interval to be $\Delta M_{{\rm 1TP}}$ $\approx$ 0.019 M$_{\odot}$ for the core mass at the first thermal pulse, $\Delta$$t_{\rm{1TP}}$ $\approx$ 12.50 Myr for the age, $\Delta \log(T_{{\rm c}}/{\rm K}) \approx$ 0.013 for the central temperature, $\Delta \log(\rho_{{\rm c}}/{\rm g \ cm}^{-3}) \approx$ 0.060 for the central density, $\Delta Y_{\rm{e,c}} \approx$ 2.6$\times$10$^{-5}$ for the central electron fraction, $\Delta X_{\rm c}(^{22}\rm{Ne}) \approx$ 5.8$\times$10$^{-4}$, $\Delta X_{\rm c}(^{12}\rm{C}) \approx$ 0.392, and $\Delta X_{\rm c}(^{16}\rm{O}) \approx$ 0.392. Uncertainties in the experimental $^{12}$C($\alpha,\gamma)^{16}\rm{O}$, triple-$\alpha$, and $^{14}$N($p,\gamma)^{15}\rm{O}$ reaction rates dominate these variations. We also consider a grid of 1 to 6 M$_{\odot}$ models evolved from the pre main-sequence to the final white dwarf to probe the sensitivity of the initial-final mass relation to experimental uncertainties in the hydrogen and helium reaction rates.
  • We explore the effects of rotation on convective carbon, oxygen, and silicon shell burning during the late stages of evolution in a 20Msun star. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) we construct 1D stellar models both with no rotation and with an initial rigid rotation of 50% of critical. At different points during the evolution, we map the 1D models into 2D and follow the multidimensional evolution using the FLASH compressible hydrodynamics code for many convective turnover times until a quasi-steady state is reached. We characterize the strength and scale of convective motions via decomposition of the momentum density into vector spherical harmonics. We find that rotation influences the total power in solenoidal modes, with a slightly larger impact for carbon and oxygen shell burning than for silicon shell burning. Including rotation in one-dimensional (1D) stellar evolution models alters the structure of the star in a manner that has a significant impact on the character of multidimensional convection. Adding modest amounts of rotation to a stellar model that ignores rotation during the evolutionary stage, however, has little impact on the character of resulting convection. Since the spatial scale and strength of convection present at the point of core collapse directly influence the supernova mechanism, our results suggest that rotation could play an important role in setting the stage for massive stellar explosions.
  • Our understanding of stars and their fates is based on coupling observations to theoretical models. Unlike laboratory physicists, we cannot perform experiments on stars, but rather must patiently take what nature allows us to observe. Simulation offers a means of virtual experimentation, enabling a detailed understanding of the most violent ongoing explosions in the Universe---the deaths of stars.
  • Measurements of explosive nucleosynthesis yields in core-collapse supernovae provide tests for explosion models. We investigate constraints on explosive conditions derivable from measured amounts of nickel and iron after radioactive decays using nucleosynthesis networks with parameterized thermodynamic trajectories. The Ni/Fe ratio is for most regimes dominated by the production ratio of 58Ni/(54Fe + 56Ni), which tends to grow with higher neutron excess and with higher entropy. For SN 2012ec, a supernova that produced a Ni/Fe ratio of $3.4\pm1.2$ times solar, we find that burning of a fuel with neutron excess $\eta \approx 6\times 10^{-3}$ is required. Unless the progenitor metallicity is over 5 times solar, the only layer in the progenitor with such a neutron excess is the silicon shell. Supernovae producing large amounts of stable nickel thus suggest that this deep-lying layer can be, at least partially, ejected in the explosion. We find that common spherically symmetric models of $M_{\rm ZAMS} \lesssim 13$ Msun stars exploding with a delay time of less than one second ($M_{\rm cut} < 1.5$ Msun) are able to achieve such silicon-shell ejection. Supernovae that produce solar or sub-solar Ni/Fe ratios, such as SN 1987A, must instead have burnt and ejected only oxygen-shell material, which allows a lower limit to the mass cut to be set. Finally, we find that the extreme Ni/Fe value of 60-75 times solar derived for the Crab cannot be reproduced by any realistic-entropy burning outside the iron core, and neutrino-neutronization obtained in electron-capture models remains the only viable explanation.
  • Rigorous statistical methods for estimating thermonuclear reaction rates and nucleosynthesis are becoming increasingly established in nuclear astrophysics. The main challenge being faced is that experimental reaction rates are highly complex quantities derived from a multitude of different measured nuclear parameters (e.g., astrophysical S-factors, resonance energies and strengths, particle and gamma-ray partial widths). We discuss the application of the Monte Carlo method to two distinct, but related, questions. First, given a set of measured nuclear parameters, how can one best estimate the resulting thermonuclear reaction rates and associated uncertainties? Second, given a set of appropriate reaction rates, how can one best estimate the abundances from nucleosynthesis (i.e., reaction network) calculations? The techniques described here provide probability density functions that can be used to derive statistically meaningful reaction rates and final abundances for any desired coverage probability. Examples are given for applications to s-process neutron sources, core-collapse supernovae, classical novae, and big bang nucleosynthesis.
  • We revisit the evidence for the contribution of the long-lived radioactive nuclides 44Ti, 55Fe, 56Co, 57Co, and 60Co to the UVOIR light curve of SN 1987A. We show that the V-band luminosity constitutes a roughly constant fraction of the bolometric luminosity between 900 and 1900 days, and we obtain an approximate bolometric light curve out to 4334 days by scaling the late time V-band data by a constant factor where no bolometric light curve data is available. Considering the five most relevant decay chains starting at 44Ti, 55Co, 56Ni, 57Ni, and 60Co, we perform a least squares fit to the constructed composite bolometric light curve. For the nickel isotopes, we obtain best fit values of M(56Ni) = (7.1 +- 0.3) x 10^{-2} Msun and M(57Ni) = (4.1 +- 1.8) x 10^{-3} Msun. Our best fit 44Ti mass is M(44Ti) = (0.55 +- 0.17) x 10^{-4} Msun, which is in disagreement with the much higher (3.1 +- 0.8) x 10^{-4} Msun recently derived from INTEGRAL observations. The associated uncertainties far exceed the best fit values for 55Co and 60Co and, as a result, we only give upper limits on the production masses of M(55Co) < 7.2 x 10^{-3} Msun and M(60Co) < 1.7 x 10^{-4} Msun. Furthermore, we find that the leptonic channels in the decay of 57Co (internal conversion and Auger electrons) are a significant contribution and constitute up to 15.5% of the total luminosity. Consideration of the kinetic energy of these electrons is essential in lowering our best fit nickel isotope production ratio to [57Ni/56Ni]=2.5+-1.1, which is still somewhat high but is in agreement with gamma-ray observations and model predictions.
  • There is compelling evidence that the peak brightness of a Type Ia supernova is affected by the electron fraction Ye at the time of the explosion. The electron fraction is set by the aboriginal composition of the white dwarf and the reactions that occur during the pre explosive convective burning. To date, determining the makeup of the white dwarf progenitor has relied on indirect proxies, such as the average metallicity of the host stellar population. In this paper, we present analytical calculations supporting the idea that the electron fraction of the progenitor systematically influences the nucleosynthesis of silicon group ejecta in Type Ia supernovae. In particular, we suggest the abundances generated in quasi nuclear statistical equilibrium are preserved during the subsequent freezeout. This allows one to potential recovery of Ye at explosion from the abundances recovered from an observed spectra. We show that measurement of 28Si, 32S, 40Ca, and 54Fe abundances can be used to construct Ye in the silicon rich regions of the supernovae. If these four abundances are determined exactly, they are sufficient to recover Ye to 6 percent. This is because these isotopes dominate the composition of silicon-rich material and iron rich material in quasi nuclear statistical equilibrium. Analytical analysis shows that the 28Si abundance is insensitive to Ye, the 32S abundance has a nearly linear trend with Ye, and the 40Ca abundance has a nearly quadratic trend with Ye. We verify these trends with post-processing of 1D models and show that these trends are reflected in model synthetic spectra.
  • We substantially update the capabilities of the open source software package Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), and its one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESA Star. Improvements in MESA Star's ability to model the evolution of giant planets now extends its applicability down to masses as low as one-tenth that of Jupiter. The dramatic improvement in asteroseismology enabled by the space-based Kepler and CoRoT missions motivates our full coupling of the ADIPLS adiabatic pulsation code with MESA Star. This also motivates a numerical recasting of the Ledoux criterion that is more easily implemented when many nuclei are present at non-negligible abundances. This impacts the way in which MESA Star calculates semi-convective and thermohaline mixing. We exhibit the evolution of 3-8 Msun stars through the end of core He burning, the onset of He thermal pulses, and arrival on the white dwarf cooling sequence. We implement diffusion of angular momentum and chemical abundances that enable calculations of rotating-star models, which we compare thoroughly with earlier work. We introduce a new treatment of radiation-dominated envelopes that allows the uninterrupted evolution of massive stars to core collapse. This enables the generation of new sets of supernovae, long gamma-ray burst, and pair-instability progenitor models. We substantially modify the way in which MESA Star solves the fully coupled stellar structure and composition equations, and we show how this has improved MESA's performance scaling on multi-core processors. Updates to the modules for equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmospheric boundary conditions are also provided. We describe the MESA Software Development Kit (SDK) that packages all the required components needed to form a unified and maintained build environment for MESA. [Abridged]
  • STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (i) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (ii) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p,g), (p,a), (a,n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.
  • Despite much effort in the past decades, the C-burning reaction rate is uncertain by several orders of magnitude, and the relative strength between the different channels 12C(12C,alpha)20Ne, 12C(12C,p)23Na and 12C(12C,n)23Mg is poorly determined. Additionally, in C-burning conditions a high 12C+12C rate may lead to lower central C-burning temperatures and to 13C(alpha,n)16O emerging as a more dominant neutron source than 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg, increasing significantly the s-process production. This is due to the rapid decrease of the 13N(gamma,p)12C with decreasing temperature, causing the 13C production via 13N(beta+)13C. Presented here is the impact of the 12C+12C reaction uncertainties on the s-process and on explosive p-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars, including also fast rotating massive stars at low metallicity. Using various 12C+12C rates, in particular an upper and lower rate limit of ~ 50000 higher and ~ 20 lower than the standard rate at 5*10^8 K, five 25 Msun stellar models are calculated. The enhanced s-process signature due to 13C(alpha,n)16O activation is considered, taking into account the impact of the uncertainty of all three C-burning reaction branches. Consequently, we show that the p-process abundances have an average production factor increased up to about a factor of 8 compared to the standard case, efficiently producing the elusive Mo and Ru proton-rich isotopes. We also show that an s-process being driven by 13C(alpha,n)16O is a secondary process, even though the abundance of 13C does not depend on the initial metal content. Finally, implications for the Sr-peak elements inventory in the Solar System and at low metallicity are discussed.
  • Symbiotic binaries are systems containing white dwarfs (WDs) and red giants. Symbiotic novae are those systems in which thermonuclear eruptions occur on the WD components. These are to be distinguished from events driven by accretion disk instabilities analogous to dwarf novae eruptions in cataclysmic variable outbursts. Another class of symbiotic systems are those in which the WD is extremely luminous and it seems likely that quiescent nuclear burning is ongoing on the accreting WD. A fundamental question is the secular evolution of the WD. Do the repeated outbursts or quiescent burning in these accreting systems cause the WD to gain or lose mass? If it is gaining mass, can it eventually reach the Chandrasekhar Limit and become a supernova (a SN Ia if it can hide the hydrogen and helium in the system)? In order to better understand these systems, we have begun a new study of the evolution of Thermonuclear Runaways (TNRs) in the accreted envelopes of WDs using a variety of initial WD masses, luminosities and mass accretion rates. We use our 1-D hydro code, NOVA, which includes the new convective algorithm of Arnett, Meakin and Young, the Hix and Thielemann nuclear reaction solver, the Iliadis reaction rate library, the Timmes equation of state, and the OPAL opacities. We assume a solar composition (Lodders abundance distribution) and do not allow any mixing of accreted material with core material. This assumption strongly influences our results. We report here (1) that the WD grows in mass for all simulations so that canonical `steady burning' does not occur, and (2) that only a small fraction of the accreted matter is ejected in some (but not all) simulations. We also find that the accreting systems, before thermonuclear runaway, are too cool to be seen in X-ray searches for SN Ia progenitors.
  • We present a brief summary of the Single Degenerate Scenario for the progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae in which it is assumed that a low mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf is growing in mass as a result of accretion from a secondary star in a close binary system. Recent hydrodynamic simulations of accretion of solar material onto white dwarfs without mixing always produce a thermonuclear runaway and steady burning does not occur. For a broad range in WD mass (0.4 Solar masses to 1.35 Solar Masses), the maximum ejected material occurs for the 1.25 Solar Mass sequences and then decreases as the white dwarf mass decreases. Therefore, the white dwarfs are growing in mass as a consequence of the accretion of solar material and as long as there is no mixing of accreted material with core material. In contrast, a thermonuclear runaway in the accreted hydrogen-rich layers on the low luminosity WDs in close binary systems where mixing of core matter with accreted material has occurred is the outburst mechanism for Classical, Recurrent, and Symbiotic novae. The differences in characteristics of these systems is likely the WD mass and mass accretion rate. The high levels of enrichment of CN ejecta in elements ranging from carbon to sulfur confirm that there is dredge-up of matter from the core of the WD and enable them to contribute to the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. Therefore, studies of CNe can lead to an improved understanding of Galactic nucleosynthesis, some sources of pre-solar grains, and the Extragalactic distance scale. The characteristics of the outburst depend on the white dwarf mass, luminosity, mass accretion rate, and the chemical composition of both the accreting material and WD material. The properties of the outburst also depends on when, how, and if the accreted layers are mixed with the WD core and the mixing mechanism is still unknown.
  • Several lines of evidence, from isotopic analyses of meteorites to studies of the Sun's elemental and isotopic composition, indicate that the solar system was contaminated early in its evolution by ejecta from a nearby supernova (SN). Previous models have invoked SN material being injected into an extant protoplanetary disk, or isotropically expanding ejecta sweeping over a distant (>10 pc) cloud core, simultaneously enriching it and triggering its collapse. Here we consider a new astrophysical setting: the injection of clumpy SN ejecta, as observed in the Cas A SN remnant, into the molecular gas at the periphery of an HII region created by the SN's progenitor star. To track these interactions we have conducted a suite of high-resolution (1500^3 effective) 3D simulations that follow the evolution of individual clumps as they move into molecular gas. Even at these high resolutions, our simulations do not quite achieve numerical convergence, due to the challenge of properly resolving the small-scale mixing of ejecta and molecular gas, although they do allow some robust conclusions to be drawn. Isotropically exploding ejecta do not penetrate into the molecular cloud, but, if cooling is properly accounted for, clumpy ejecta penetrate to distances ~10^18 cm and mix effectively with star-forming molecular gas. The ~2 M_\odot high-metallicity ejecta from a core-collapse SN is likely to mix with ~2 \times 10^4 M_\odot of molecular gas. Thus all stars forming late (~5 Myr) in the evolution of an HII region may be contaminated by SN ejecta at a level ~10^-4. This level of contamination is consistent with the abundances of short-lived radionuclides and possibly some stable isotopic shifts in the early solar system, and is potentially consistent with the observed variability in stellar elemental abundances. SN contamination of forming planetary systems may be a common, universal process.
  • [Shortened] The 12C + 12C fusion reaction has been the subject of considerable experimental efforts to constrain uncertainties at temperatures relevant for stellar nucleosynthesis. In order to investigate the effect of an enhanced carbon burning rate on massive star structure and nucleosynthesis, new stellar evolution models and their yields are presented exploring the impact of three different 12C + 12C reaction rates. Non-rotating stellar models were generated using the Geneva Stellar Evolution Code and were later post-processed with the NuGrid Multi-zone Post-Processing Network tool. The enhanced rate causes core carbon burning to be ignited more promptly and at lower temperature. This reduces the neutrino losses, which increases the core carbon burning lifetime. An increased carbon burning rate also increases the upper initial mass limit for which a star exhibits a convective carbon core. Carbon shell burning is also affected, with fewer convective-shell episodes and convection zones that tend to be larger in mass. Consequently, the chance of an overlap between the ashes of carbon core burning and the following carbon shell convection zones is increased, which can cause a portion of the ashes of carbon core burning to be included in the carbon shell. Therefore, during the supernova explosion, the ejecta will be enriched by s-process nuclides synthesized from the carbon core s process. The yields were used to estimate the weak s-process component in order to compare with the solar system abundance distribution. The enhanced rate models were found to produce a significant proportion of Kr, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ru, Pd and Cd in the weak component, which is primarily the signature of the carbon-core s process. Consequently, it is shown that the production of isotopes in the Kr-Sr region can be used to constrain the 12C + 12C rate using the current branching ratio for a- and p-exit channels.
  • We carry out a comprehensive smooth particle hydrodynamics simulation survey of double-degenerate white dwarf binary mergers of varying mass combinations in order to establish correspondence between initial conditions and remnant configurations. We find that all but one of our simulation remnants share general properties such as a cold, degenerate core surrounded by a hot disk, while our least massive pair of stars forms only a hot disk. We characterize our remnant configurations by the core mass, the rotational velocity of the core, and the half-mass radius of the disk. We also find that some of our simulations with very massive constituent stars exhibit helium detonations on the surface of the primary star before complete disruption of the secondary. However, these helium detonations are insufficiently energetic to ignite carbon, and so do not lead to prompt carbon detonations.
  • We explore the nucleosynthesis trends from two mechanisms during freeze-out expansions in core-collapse supernovae. The first mechanism is related to the convection and instabilities within homogeneous stellar progenitor matter that is accreted through the supernova shock. The second mechanism is related to the impact of the supersonic wind termination shock (reverse shock) within the tumultuous inner regions of the ejecta above the proto-neutron star. Our results suggest that isotopes in the mass range 12<=A<=122 that are produced during the freeze-out expansions may be classified in two families. The isotopes of the first family manifest a common mass fraction evolutionary profile, whose specific shape per isotope depends on the characteristic transition between two equilibrium states (equilibrium state transition) during each type of freeze-out expansion. The first family includes the majority of isotopes in this mass range. The second family is limited to magic nuclei and isotopes in their locality, which do not sustain any transition, become nuclear flow hubs, and dominate the final composition. We use exponential and power-law adiabatic profiles to identify dynamic large-scale and small-scale equilibrium patterns among nuclear reactions. (truncated abstract) In addition, we introduce non-monotonic parameterized profiles to probe the impact of the reverse shock and multi-dimensional explosion asymmetries on nucleosynthesis. Cases are shown in which the non-monotonic profiles favor the production of radioactivities. Non-monotonic freeze-out profiles involve longer non-equilibrium nucleosynthesis intervals compared with the exponential and power-law profiles, resulting in mass fraction trends and yield distributions that may not be achieved by the monotonic freeze-out profiles.