• In this paper we have taken into account shell inhomogeneities of the single-particle level spectra in the practical model of the gamma-decay of neutron resonance developed in Dubna. The obtained data confirm a dependence of breaking thresholds for Cooper pairs on a shape of investigated nuclei - a phenomenon noticed earlier without taking into account the shell inhomogeneity.
  • The spectroscopic binary system HD 66051 (V414 Pup) consists of a highly peculiar CP3 (HgMn) star and an A-type component. It also shows out-of-eclipse variability that is due to chemical spots. This combination allows the derivation of tight constraints for the testing of time-dependent diffusion models. We analysed radial velocity and photometric data using two different methods to determine astrophysical parameters and the orbit of the system. Appropriate isochrones were used to derive the age of the system. The orbital solution and the estimates from the isochrones are in excellent agreement with the estimates from a prior spectroscopic study. The system is very close to the zero-age main sequence and younger than 120 Myr. HD 66051 is a most important spectroscopic binary system that can be used to test the predictions of the diffusion theory explaining the peculiar surface abundances of CP3 stars.
  • Based on XMM--Newton X-ray observations IGR J19552+0044 appears to be either a pre-polar or an asynchronous polar. We conducted follow-up optical observations to identify the sources and periods of variability precisely and to classify this X-ray source correctly. Extensive multicolor photometric and medium- to high-resolution spectroscopy observations were performed and period search codes were applied to sort out the complex variability of the object. We found firm evidence of discording spectroscopic (81.29+/-0.01m) and photometric (83.599+/-0.002m) periods that we ascribe to the white dwarf (WD)\ spin period and binary orbital period, respectively. This confirms that IGR J19552+0044 is an asynchronous polar. Wavelength-dependent variability and its continuously changing shape point at a cyclotron emission from a magnetic WD with a relatively low magnetic field below 20 MG. The difference between the WD spin period and the binary orbital period proves that IGR J19552+0044 is a polar with the largest known degree of asynchronism (0.97 or 3%).
  • To better understand the LBV phenomenon, we analyze multi-epoch and multi-wavelength spectra and photometry of R71. Pre-outburst spectra are analyzed with the radiative transfer code CMFGEN to determine the star's fundamental stellar parameters. During quiescence, R71 has an effective temperature of $T_\mathrm{{eff}} = 15\,500~K$ and a luminosity of log$(L_*/L_{\odot})$ = 5.78 and is thus a classical LBV, but at the lower luminosity end of this group. We determine its mass-loss rate to $4.0 \times 10^{-6}~M_{\odot}~$yr$^{-1}$. We present R71's spectral energy distribution from the near-ultraviolet to the mid-infrared during its present outburst. Mid-infrared observations suggest that we are witnessing dust formation and grain evolution. Semi-regular oscillatory variability in the star's light curve is observed during the current outburst. Absorption lines develop a second blue component on a timescale twice that length. The variability may consist of one (quasi-)periodic component with P ~ 425/850 d with additional variations superimposed. During its current S Doradus outburst, R71 occupies a region in the HR diagram at the high-luminosity extension of the Cepheid instability strip and exhibits similar irregular variations as RV Tau variables. LBVs do not pass the Cepheid instability strip because of core evolution, but they develop comparable cool, low-mass, extended atmospheres in which convective instabilities may occur. As in the case of RV Tau variables, the occurrence of double absorption lines with an apparent regular cycle may be due to shocks within the atmosphere and period doubling may explain the factor of two in the lengths of the photometric and spectroscopic cycles.
  • The substellar companion HD206893b has recently been discovered by direct imaging of its disc-bearing host star with the SPHERE instrument. We investigate the atypical properties of the companion, which has the reddest near-infrared colours among all known substellar objects, either orbiting a star or isolated, and we provide a comprehensive characterisation of the host star-disc-companion system. We conducted a follow-up of the companion with adaptive optics imaging and spectro-imaging with SPHERE, and a multiinstrument follow-up of its host star. We obtain a R=30 spectrum from 0.95 to 1.64 micron of the companion and additional photometry at 2.11 and 2.25 micron. We carried out extensive atmosphere model fitting for the companions and the host star in order to derive their age, mass, and metallicity. We found no additional companion in the system in spite of exquisite observing conditions resulting in sensitivity to 6MJup (2MJup) at 0.5" for an age of 300 Myr (50 Myr). We detect orbital motion over more than one year and characterise the possible Keplerian orbits. We constrain the age of the system to a minimum of 50 Myr and a maximum of 700 Myr, and determine that the host-star metallicity is nearly solar. The comparison of the companion spectrum and photometry to model atmospheres indicates that the companion is an extremely dusty late L dwarf, with an intermediate gravity (log g 4.5-5.0) which is compatible with the independent age estimate of the system. Though our best fit corresponds to a brown dwarf of 15-30 MJup aged 100-300 Myr, our analysis is also compatible with a range of masses and ages going from a 50 Myr 12MJup planetary-mass object to a 50 MJup Hyades-age brown dwarf...
  • Low-mass members of young stellar associations exhibit a wide spread of rotation periods. Such a spread originates from distributions of masses and initial rotation periods. However, multiplicity can also play a significant role. We investigate the role played by physical companions in shortening the primordial disc lifetime. We have compiled the most extensive list of low-mass members of the young 25-Myr beta Pictoris association. We have measured the rotation periods of about all members and used updated UVWXYZ components to assess their membership. We built the rotation period distribution distinguishing between bona fide members and candidate members and according to their multiplicity status. We found that single stars and components of multiple systems in wide orbits (>80 AU) have rotation periods that exhibit a well defined sequence arising from mass distribution. All components of multiple systems in close orbits (<80 AU) have rotation periods significantly shorter than their equal-mass single counterparts. A comparison with the younger 13 Myr h Per cluster and with the older 40-Myr open clusters/stellar associations NGC2547, IC2391, Argus, and IC2602 and the 130-Myr Pleiades shows that whereas the evolution of F-G stars is well reproduced by angular momentum evolution models, this is not the case for the slow K and early-M stars. Finally, we found that the amplitude of their light curves is correlated neither with rotation nor with mass. Once single stars and wide components of multiple systems are separated from close components of multiple systems, the rotation period distributions exhibit a well defined dependence on mass that allows to make a meaningful comparison with similar distributions of either younger or older associations/clusters. Such cleaned distributions allow to use the stellar rotation period as age indicator, meaningfully for F and G type stars.
  • The BVI lightcurves of seven recent novae have been extensively mapped with daily robotic observations from Atacama (Chile). They are V1534 Sco, V1535 Sco, V2949 Oph, V3661 Oph, MASTER OT J010603.18-744715.8, TCP J1734475-240942 and ASASSN-16ma. Five belong to the Bulge, one to SMC and another is a Galactic disk object. The two program novae detected in gamma-rays by Fermi-LAT (TCP J1734475-240942 and ASASSN-16ma) are Bulge objects with unevolved companions. They distinguish themselves in showing a double-component optical lightcurve. The first component to develop is the fireball from freely-expanding, ballistic-launched ejecta with the time of passage through maximum which is strongly dependent on wavelength (~1 day delay between B and I bands). The second component, emerging simultaneously with the nova detection in gamma-rays, evolves at a slower pace, its optical brightness being proportional to the gamma-ray flux, and its passage through maximum not dependent on wavelength. The fact that gamma-rays are detected at peak flux level differing by 4x from novae at the distance of the Bulge seems to suggest that gamma-ray emission is not a widespread property of normal novae. We discuss the advantages offered by high-quality photometric observations collected with only one telescope (as opposed to data provided by a number of different instruments), and observe the effects of: wavelength dependence of a fireball expansion, recombination in the flashed wind of a giant companion, subtle presence of hiccups, super-soft X-ray emission on and off. Four program novae (V2949 Oph, V3661 Oph, TCP J18102829-2729590, and ASASSN-16ma) are found to have normal dwarf companions, while V1534 Sco contains an M3III giant, V1535 Sco a K-type giant, and MASTER OT J010603.18-744715.8 a sub-giant.
  • We report extensive 3-yr multiwavelength observations of the WZ Sge-type dwarf nova SSS J122221.7-311525 during its unusual double superoutburst, the following decline and in quiescence. The second segment of the superoutburst had a long duration of 33 d and a very gentle decline with a rate of 0.02 mag/d, and it displayed an extended post-outburst decline lasting at least 500 d. Simultaneously with the start of the rapid fading from the superoutburst plateau, the system showed the appearance of a strong near-infrared excess resulting in very red colours, which reached extreme values (B-I~1.4) about 20 d later. The colours then became bluer again, but it took at least 250 d to acquire a stable level. Superhumps were clearly visible in the light curve from our very first time-resolved observations until at least 420 d after the rapid fading from the superoutburst. The spectroscopic and photometric data revealed an orbital period of 109.80 min and a fractional superhump period excess <0.8 per cent, indicating a very low mass ratio q<0.045. With such a small mass ratio the donor mass should be below the hydrogen-burning minimum mass limit. The observed infrared flux in quiescence is indeed much lower than is expected from a cataclysmic variable with a near-main-sequence donor star. This strongly suggests a brown-dwarf-like nature for the donor and that SSS J122221.7-311525 has already evolved away from the period minimum towards longer periods, with the donor now extremely dim.
  • We present an analysis of photometric observations of the eclipsing novalike variable DW UMa made by the CBA consortium between 1999 and 2015. Analysis of 372 new and 260 previously published eclipse timings reveals a 13.6 year period or quasi-period in the times of minimum light. The seasonal light curves show a complex spectrum of periodic signals: both positive and negative superhumps, likely arising from a prograde apsidal precession and a retrograde nodal precession of the accretion disc. These signals appear most prominently and famously as sidebands of the orbital frequency but the precession frequencies themselves, at 0.40 and 0.22 cycles per day, are also seen directly in the power spectrum. The superhumps are sometimes seen together and sometimes separately. The depth, width and skew of eclipses are all modulated in phase with both nodal and apsidal precession of the tilted and eccentric accretion disc. The superhumps, or more correctly the precessional motions which produce them, may be essential to understanding the mysterious SW Sextantis syndrome. Disc wobble and eccentricity can both produce Doppler signatures inconsistent with the true dynamical motions in the binary, and disc wobble might boost the mass-transfer rate by enabling the hot white dwarf to directly irradiate the secondary star.
  • We intended to compile the most complete catalog of bona fide members and candidate members of the beta Pictoris association, and to measure their rotation periods and basic properties from our own observations, public archives, and exploring the literature. We carried out a multi-observatories campaign to get our own photometric time series and collected all archived public photometric data time series for the stars in our catalog. Each time series was analyzed with the Lomb-Scargle and CLEAN periodograms to search for the stellar rotation periods. We complemented the measured rotational properties with detailed information on multiplicity, membership, and projected rotational velocity available in the literature and discussed star by star. We measured the rotation periods of 112 out of 117 among bona fide members and candidate members of the beta Pictoris association and, whenever possible, we also measured the luminosity, radius, and inclination of the stellar rotation axis. This represents to date the largest catalog of rotation periods of any young loose stellar association. We provided an extensive catalog of rotation periods together with other relevant basic properties useful to explore a number of open issues, such as the causes of spread of rotation periods among coeval stars, evolution of angular momentum, and lithium-rotation connection.
  • WD 1145+017 was observed from 2015 November to 2016 July for the purpose of characterizing transit behavior of the white dwarf by dust clouds thought to be produced by fragments of an asteroid in close orbit with the star. Fortuitously, most of these observations were carried out during a time when the overall `dip' activity was dramatically enhanced over that during its discovery with Kepler K2. By the end of our reported observations the dip activity had declined to a level close to its K2 discovery state. Three notable events were observed. In 2016 January a large number of dust clouds appeared that had an orbital period of 4.4912 hours, and this event also marked the end of a 3-month interval dominated by the K2 `A' period. The second event was a 2016 April 21 appearance of four dip features with drift lines in a waterfall diagram (date vs. phase) that diverged from their origin date, at a location away from the `A' asteroid, and which lasted for two weeks. The third event was the sudden appearance of a dip feature with a period of 4.6064 hours, which is essentially the same as the K2 `B' period. The evolution of dip shape, depth, and total fade amount provide constraints on dust production and loss mechanisms. Collisions can account for the sudden appearance of dust clouds, and the sudden increase in dust amount, but another mechanism for continual dust production is also required.
  • White dwarfs are compact stars, similar in size to Earth but ~200,000 times more massive. Isolated white dwarfs emit most of their power from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths, but when in close orbits with less dense stars, white dwarfs can strip material from their companions, and the resulting mass transfer can generate atomic line and X-ray emission, as well as near- and mid-infrared radiation if the white dwarf is magnetic. However, even in binaries, white dwarfs are rarely detected at far-infrared or radio frequencies. Here we report the discovery of a white dwarf / cool star binary that emits from X-ray to radio wavelengths. The star, AR Scorpii (henceforth AR Sco), was classified in the early 1970s as a delta-Scuti star, a common variety of periodic variable star. Our observations reveal instead a 3.56 hr period close binary, pulsing in brightness on a period of 1.97 min. The pulses are so intense that AR Sco's optical flux can increase by a factor of four within 30 s, and they are detectable at radio frequencies, the first such detection for any white dwarf system. They reflect the spin of a magnetic white dwarf which we find to be slowing down on a 10^7 yr timescale. The spin-down power is an order of magnitude larger than that seen in electromagnetic radiation, which, together with an absence of obvious signs of accretion, suggests that AR Sco is primarily spin-powered. Although the pulsations are driven by the white dwarf's spin, they originate in large part from the cool star. AR Sco's broad-band spectrum is characteristic of synchrotron radiation, requiring relativistic electrons. These must either originate from near the white dwarf or be generated in situ at the M star through direct interaction with the white dwarf's magnetosphere.
  • Optical (BVRI) photometry of the first three weeks of the 2016 outburst of the recurrent Nova LMC 1968 is presented and discussed. The 2016 I-band light-curve is an exact replica, even in the most minute details, of that for the 2010 eruption. The maximum is inferred to have occurred on 2016 Jan 21.2 at I=11.5 mag, corresponding to an absolute magnitude M(I)=-7.15. A ~1 day plateau is present in all bands about six days past optical maximum, simultaneous with the emergence of super-soft X-ray emission in Swift observations, signalling the widespread ionization of the ejecta. The nova entered a much longer plateau about 9 days past maximum, governed by the brightness of the white dwarf, now directly visible and still nuclearly burning on its surface. An outburst recurrence mean period of ~955 days (2.6 yrs) would fit both the OGLE inter-season gaps and the observed intervals between previous outburts.
  • We monitored the recent FUor 2MASS J06593158-0405277 (V960 Mon) since November 2009 at various observatories and multiple wavelengths. After the outburst by nearly 2.9 mag in $r$ around September 2014 the brightness gently fades until April 2015 by nearly 1 mag in $U$ and 0.5 mag in $z$. Thereafter the brightness at $\lambda>5000 \AA$ was constant until June 2015 while the shortest wavelengths ($U, B$) indicate a new rise, similar to that seen for the FUor V2493 Cyg (HBC722). Our near-infrared (NIR) monitoring between December 2014 and April 2015 shows a smaller outburst amplitude ($\sim$2 mag) and a smaller (0.2 $-$ 0.3 mag) post-outburst brightness decline. Optical and NIR color-magnitude diagrams indicate that the brightness decline is caused by growing extinction. The post-outburst light curves are modulated by an oscillating color-neutral pattern with a period of about 17 days and an amplitude declining from $\sim$0.08 mag in October 2014 to $\sim$0.04 mag in May 2015. The properties of the oscillating pattern lead us to suggest the presence of a close binary with eccentric orbit.
  • The young (~16 Myr) pre-main-sequence star in Sco-Cen 1SWASP J140747.93-394542.6, hereafter referred to as J1407, underwent a deep eclipse in 2007 April, bracketed by several shallower eclipses in the surrounding 54 d. This has been interpreted as the first detection of an eclipsing ring system circling a substellar object (dubbed J1407b). We report on a search for this companion with Sparse Aperture Mask imaging and direct imaging with both the UT4 VLT and Keck telescopes. Radial velocity measurements of J1407 provide additional constraints on J1407b and on short period companions to the central star. Follow-up photometric monitoring using the PROMPT-4 and ROAD observatories during 2012-2014 has not yielded any additional eclipses. Large regions of mass-period space are ruled out for the companion. For circular orbits the companion period is constrained to the range 3.5-13.8 yr (a ~ 2.2-5.6 au), and masses greater than 80 M_Jup are ruled out at 3 sigma significance over these periods. The complex ring system appears to occupy more than 0.15 of its Hill radius, much larger than its Roche radius and suggesting a ring structure in transition. Further, we demonstrate that the radial velocity of J1407 is consistent with membership in the Upper Cen-Lup subgroup of the Sco-Cen association, and constraints on the rotation period and projected rotational velocity of J1407 are consistent with a stellar inclination of 68+-10 degrees.
  • We report photometric detections of orbital and superorbital signals, and negative orbital sidebands, in the light curves of the nova-like cataclysmic variables AQ Mensae and IM Eridani. The frequencies of the orbital, superorbital, and sideband signals are 7.0686 (3), 0.263 (3), and 7.332 (3) cycles per day (c/d) in AQ Mensae, and 6.870 (1), 0.354 (7), and 7.226 (1) c/d in IM Eridani. We also find a spectroscopic orbital frequency in IM Eridani of 6.86649 (2) c/d. These observations can be reproduced by invoking an accretion disc that is tilted with respect to the orbital plane. This model works well for X-ray binaries, in which irradiation by a primary neutron star can account for the disc's tilt. A likely tilt mechanism has yet to be identified in CVs, yet the growing collection of observational evidence indicates that the phenomenon of tilt is indeed at work in this class of object. The results presented in this paper bring the number of CVs known to display signals associated with retrograde disc precession to twelve. We also find AQ Mensae to be an eclipsing system. The eclipse depths are highly variable, which suggests that the eclipses are grazing. This finding raises the possibility of probing variations in disc tilt by studying systematic variations in the eclipse profile.
  • The amount of emitted prompt neutrons from the fission fragments increases as a function of excitation energy. Yet it is not fully understood whether the increase in \nu(A) as a function of E_{n} is mass dependent. The share of excitation energies among the fragments is still under debate, but there are reasons to believe that the excess in neutron emission originates only from the heavy fragments, leaving \nu_{light}(A) almost unchanged. In this work we investigated the consequences of a mass-dependent increase in \nu(A) on the final mass and energy distributions. The assumptions on \nu(A) are essential when analysing measurements based on the 2E-technique. This choice showed to be significant on the measured observables. For example, the post-neutron emission mass yield distribution revealed changes up to 10-30%. The outcome of this work pinpoint the urgent need to determine \nu(A) experimentally, and in particular, how \nu(A) changes as a function of incident-neutron energy. Until then, many fission yields in the data libraries could be largely affected, since they were analysed based on another assumption on the neutron emission.
  • We report the results of a 3 year-long dedicated monitoring campaign of a restless Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) in NGC 7259. The object, named SN 2009ip, was observed photometrically and spectroscopically in the optical and near-infrared domains. We monitored a number of erupting episodes in the past few years, and increased the density of our observations during eruptive episodes. In this paper we present the full historical data set from 2009-2012 with multi-wavelength dense coverage of the two high luminosity events between August - September 2012. We construct bolometric light curves and measure the total luminosities of these eruptive or explosive events. We label them the 2012a event (lasting ~50 days) with a peak of 3x10^41 erg/s, and the 2012b event (14 day rise time, still ongoing) with a peak of 8x10^42 erg/s. The latter event reached an absolute R-band magnitude of about -18, comparable to that of a core-collapse supernova (SN). Our historical monitoring has detected high-velocity spectral features (~13000 km/s) in September 2011, one year before the current SN-like event. This implies that the detection of such high velocity outflows cannot, conclusively, point to a core-collapse SN origin. We suggest that the initial peak in the 2012a event was unlikely to be due to a faint core-collapse SN. We propose that the high intrinsic luminosity of the latest peak, the variability history of SN 2009ip, and the detection of broad spectral lines indicative of high-velocity ejecta are consistent with a pulsational pair-instability event, and that the star may have survived the last outburst. The question of the survival of the LBV progenitor star and its future fate remain open issues, only to be answered with future monitoring of this historically unique explosion.
  • We present high speed optical, spectroscopic and Swift X-ray observations made during the dwarf nova superoutburst of CC Scl in November 2011. An orbital period of 1.383 h and superhump period of 1.443 h were measured, but the principal new finding is that CC Scl is a previously unrecognised intermediate polar, with a white dwarf spin period of 389.49 s which is seen in both optical and Swift X-ray light curves only during the outburst. In this it closely resembles the old nova GK Per, but unlike the latter has one of the shortest orbital periods among intermediate polars.
  • We used the GEOS database to study the Blazhko effect of galactic RRab stars. The database is continuously enriched by maxima supplied by amateur astronomers and by a dedicated survey by means of the two TAROT robotic telescopes. The same value of the Blazhko period is observed at different values of the pulsation periods and different values of the Blazhko periods are observed at the same value of the pulsation period. There are clues suggesting that the Blazhko effect is changing from one cycle to the next. The secular changes in the pulsation and Blazhko periods of Z CVn are anticorrelated. The diagrams of magnitudes against phases of the maxima clearly show that the light curves of Blazhko variables can be explained as modulated signals, both in amplitude and in frequency. The closed curves describing the Blazhko cycles in such diagrams have different shapes, reflecting the phase shifts between the epochs of the brightest maximum and the maximum O-C. Our sample shows that both clockwise and anticlockwise directions are possible for similar shapes. The improved observational knowledge of the Blazhko effect, in addition to some peculiarities of the light curves, have still to be explained by a satisfactory physical mechanism.
  • This paper describes the reclassification of DK And, formerly classified as a RRc type star, as EW binary. 1599 CCD unfiltered and filtered (V and R band) observations between 1999 and 2005 show, that the star is actually an eclipsing binary star with a period of P = 0.4892224 +/- 0.0000002 [d] with epoch E0 = 2451435.4353 +/- 0.0010 (if all historic data were taken into account). From our new observations 12 timings of minimum light are given.