• We present the results from an analysis of deep Herschel Space Observatory observations of six nearby dwarf galaxies known to host galactic-scale winds. The superior far-infrared sensitivity and angular resolution of Herschel have allowed detection of cold circumgalactic dust features beyond the stellar components of the host galaxies traced by Spitzer 4.5 $\mu$m images. Comparisons of these cold dust features with ancillary data reveal an imperfect spatial correlation with the ionized gas and warm dust wind components. We find that typically $\sim$10-20\% of the total dust mass in these galaxies resides outside of their stellar disks, but this fraction reaches $\sim$60\% in the case of NGC 1569. This galaxy also has the largest metallicity (O/H) deficit in our sample for its stellar mass. Overall, the small number of objects in our sample precludes drawing strong conclusions on the origin of the circumgalactic dust. We detect no statistically significant trends with star formation properties of the host galaxies, as might be expected if the dust were lifted above the disk by energy inputs from on-going star formation activity. Although a case for dust entrained in a galactic wind is seen in NGC 1569, in all cases, we cannot rule out the possibility that some of the circumgalactic dust might be associated instead with gas accreted or removed from the disk by recent galaxy interaction events, or that it is part of the outer gas-rich portion of the disk that lies below the sensitivity limit of the Spitzer 4.5 $\mu$m data.
  • We present numerical simulations of reorienting oblique shocks that form in the collision layer between magnetized colliding flows. Reorientation aligns parsec-scale post-shock filaments normal to the background magnetic field. We find that reorientation begins with pressure gradients between the collision region and the ambient medium. This drives a lateral expansion of post-shock gas, which reorients the growing filament from the outside-in (i.e. from the flow-ambient boundary, toward the colliding flows axis). The final structures of our simulations resemble polarization observations of filaments in Taurus and Serpens South, as well as the integral-shaped filament in Orion A. Given the ubiquity of colliding flows in the interstellar medium, shock reorientation may be relevant to the formation of filaments normal to magnetic fields.
  • Turbulence models attempt to account for unresolved dynamics and diffusion in hydrodynamical simulations. We develop a common framework for two-equation Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, and we implement six models in the Athena code. We verify each implementation with the standard subsonic mixing layer, although the level of agreement depends on the definition of the mixing layer width. We then test the validity of each model into the supersonic regime, showing that compressibility corrections can improve agreement with experiment. For models with buoyancy effects, we also verify our implementation via the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a stratified medium. The models are then applied to the ubiquitous astrophysical shock-cloud interaction in three dimensions. We focus on the mixing of shock and cloud material, comparing results from turbulence models to high-resolution simulations (up to 200 cells per cloud radius) and ensemble-averaged simulations. We find that the turbulence models lead to increased spreading and mixing of the cloud, although no two models predict the same result. Increased mixing is also observed in inviscid simulations at resolutions greater than 100 cells per radius, which suggests that the turbulent mixing begins to be resolved.
  • We present three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of the self-gravitating interstellar medium (ISM) in a periodic (256 pc)$^3$ box with a mean number density of 0.5 cm$^{-3}$. At a fixed supernova rate we investigate the multi-phase ISM structure, H$_{2}$ molecule formation and density-magnetic field scaling for varying initial magnetic field strengths (0, $6\times 10^{-3}$, 0.3, 3 $\mu$G). All magnetic runs saturate at mass weighted field strengths of $\sim$ 1 $-$ 3 $\mu$G but the ISM structure is notably different. With increasing initial field strengths (from $6\times 10^{-3}$ to 3 $\mu$G) the simulations develop an ISM with a more homogeneous density and temperature structure, with increasing mass (from 5% to 85%) and volume filling fractions (from 4% to 85%) of warm (300 K $<$ T $<$ 8000 K) gas, with decreasing volume filling fractions (VFF) from $\sim$ 35% to $\sim$ 12% of hot gas (T $> 10^5$ K) and with a decreasing H$_{2}$ mass fraction (from 70% to $<$ 1%). Meanwhile the mass fraction of gas in which the magnetic pressure dominates over the thermal pressure increases by a factor of 10, from 0.07 for an initial field of $6\times 10^{-3}$ $\mu$G to 0.7 for a 3 $\mu$G initial field. In all but the simulations with the highest initial field strength self-gravity promotes the formation of dense gas and H$_{2}$, but does not change any other trends. We conclude that magnetic fields have a significant impact on the multi-phase, chemical and thermal structure of the ISM and discuss potential implications and limitations of the model.
  • High levels of deuterium fraction in N$_2$H$^+$ are observed in some pre-stellar cores. Single-zone chemical models find that the timescale required to reach observed values ($D_{\rm frac}^{{\rm N}_2{\rm H}^+} \equiv {\rm N}_2{\rm D}^+/{\rm N}_2{\rm H}^+ \gtrsim 0.1$) is longer than the free-fall time, possibly ten times longer. Here, we explore the deuteration of turbulent, magnetized cores with 3D magnetohydrodynamics simulations. We use an approximate chemical model to follow the growth in abundances of N$_2$H$^+$ and N$_2$D$^+$. We then examine the dynamics of the core using each tracer for comparison to observations. We find that the velocity dispersion of the core as traced by N$_2$D$^+$ appears slightly sub-virial compared to predictions of the Turbulent Core Model of McKee & Tan, except at late times just before the onset of protostar formation. By varying the initial mass surface density, the magnetic energy, the chemical age, and the ortho-to-para ratio of H$_2$, we also determine the physical and temporal properties required for high deuteration. We find that low initial ortho-to-para ratios ($\lesssim 0.01$) and/or multiple free-fall times ($\gtrsim 3$) of prior chemical evolution are necessary to reach the observed values of deuterium fraction in pre-stellar cores.
  • The presence of short-lived radioisotopes (SLRs) in solar system meteorites has been interpreted as evidence that the solar system was exposed to a supernova shortly before or during its formation. Yet results from hydrodynamical models of SLR injection into the proto-solar cloud or disc suggest that gas-phase mixing may not be efficient enough to reproduce the observed abundances. As an alternative, we explore the injection of SLRs via dust grains as a way to overcome the mixing barrier. We numerically model the interaction of a supernova remnant containing SLR-rich dust grains with a nearby molecular cloud. The dust grains are subject to drag forces and both thermal and non-thermal sputtering. We confirm that the expanding gas shell stalls upon impact with the dense cloud and that gas-phase SLR injection occurs slowly due to hydrodynamical instabilities at the cloud surface. In contrast, dust grains of sufficient size (> 1 micron) decouple from the gas and penetrate into the cloud within 0.1 Myr. Once inside the cloud, the dust grains are destroyed by sputtering, releasing SLRs and rapidly enriching the dense (potentially star-forming) regions. Our results suggest that SLR transport on dust grains is a viable mechanism to explain SLR enrichment.
  • Using synthetic absorption lines generated from 3D hydro-dynamical simulations we explore how the velocity of a starburst-driven galactic wind correlates with the star formation rate (SFR) and SFR density. We find strong correlations until the scaling relations flatten abruptly at a point set by the mass loading of the starburst. Below this point the scaling relation depends on the temperature regime being probed by the absorption line, not on the mass loading. The exact scaling relation depends on whether the maximum or mean velocity of the absorption line is used. We find that the outflow velocity of neutral gas is four to five times lower than the average velocity of the hottest gas, with the difference in velocity between the neutral and ionized gas increasing with gas ionization. Thus, absorption lines of neutral or low ionized gas will underestimate the outflow velocity of hot gas, severely underestimating outflow energetics.
  • Our three-dimensional hydro-dynamical simulations of starbursts examine the formation of superbubbles over a range of driving luminosities and mass loadings that determine superbubble growth and wind velocity. From this we determine the relationship between the velocity of a galactic wind and the power of the starburst. We find a threshold for the formation of a wind, above which the speed of the wind is not affected by grid resolution or the temperature floor of our radiative cooling. We investigate the effect two different temperature floors in our radiative cooling prescription have on wind kinematics and content. We find that cooling to $10$ K instead of to $10^4$ K increases the mass fraction of cold neutral and hot X-ray gas in the galactic wind while halving that in warm H$\alpha$. Our simulations show the mass of cold gas transported into the lower halo does not depend on the starburst strength. Optically bright filaments form at the edge of merging superbubbles, or where a cold dense cloud has been disrupted by the wind. Filaments formed by merging superbubbles will persist and grow to $>400$ pc in length if anchored to a star forming complex. Filaments embedded in the hot galactic wind contain warm and cold gas that moves $300-1200$ km s$^{-1}$ slower than the surrounding wind, with the coldest gas hardly moving with respect to the galaxy. Warm and cold matter in the galactic wind show asymmetric absorption profiles consistent with observations, with a thin tail up to the wind velocity.
  • The colliding flows (CF) model is a well-supported mechanism for generating molecular clouds. However, to-date most CF simulations have focused on the formation of clouds in the normal-shock layer between head-on colliding flows. We performed simulations of magnetized colliding flows that instead meet at an oblique-shock layer. Oblique shocks generate shear in the post-shock environment, and this shear creates inhospitable environments for star formation. As the degree of shear increases (i.e. the obliquity of the shock increases), we find that it takes longer for sink particles to form, they form in lower numbers, and they tend to be less massive. With regard to magnetic fields, we find that even a weak field stalls gravitational collapse within forming clouds. Additionally, an initially oblique collision interface tends to reorient over time in the presence of a magnetic field, so that it becomes normal to the oncoming flows. This was demonstrated by our most oblique shock interface, which became fully normal by the end of the simulation.
  • The Smith Cloud is a gaseous high-velocity cloud (HVC) in an advanced state of accretion, only 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane and due to impact the disk in 27 Myr. It is unique among HVCs in having a known distance (12.4+/-1.3 kpc) and a well-constrained 3D velocity (296 km/s), but its origin has long remained a mystery. Here we present the first absorption-line measurements of its metallicity, using HST/COS UV spectra of three AGN lying behind the Cloud together with Green Bank Telescope 21 cm spectra of the same directions. Using Voigt-profile fitting of the S II 1250, 1253, 1259 triplet together with ionization corrections derived from photoionization modeling, we derive the sulfur abundance in each direction; a weighted average of the three measurements gives [S/H]=-0.28+/-0.14, or 0.53+0.21-0.15 solar metallicity. The finding that the Smith Cloud is metal-enriched lends support to scenarios where it represents recycled Galactic material rather than the remnant of a dwarf galaxy or accreting intergalactic gas. The metallicity and trajectory of the Cloud are both indicative of an origin in the outer disk. However, its large mass and prograde kinematics remain to be fully explained. If the cloud has accreted cooling gas from the corona during its fountain trajectory, as predicted in recent theoretical work, its current mass would be higher than its launch mass, alleviating the mass concern.
  • In an extension of Fischera & Martin (2012a) and Heitsch (2013), two aspects of the evolution of externally pressurized, hydrostatic filaments are discussed. (a) The free-fall accretion of gas onto such a filament will lead to filament parameters (specifically, FWHM--column density relations) inconsistent with the observations of Arzoumanian et al. (2011), except for two cases: For low-mass, isothermal filaments, agreement is found as in the analysis by Fischera & Martin (2012b). Magnetized cases, for which the field scales weakly with the density as $B\propto n^{1/2}$, also reproduce observed parameters. (b) Realistically, the filaments will be embedded not only in gas of non-zero pressure, but also of non-zero density. Thus, the appearance of sheet-embedded filaments is explored. Generating a grid of filament models and comparing the resulting column density ratios and profile shapes with observations suggests that the three-dimensional filament profiles are intrinsically flatter than isothermal, beyond projection and evolution effects.
  • Two aspects of filamentary molecular cloud evolution are addressed: (1) Exploring analytically the role of the environment for the evolution of filaments demonstrates that considering them in isolation (i.e. just addressing the fragmentation stability) will result in unphysical conclusions about the filament's properties. Accretion can also explain the observed decorrelation between FWHM and peak column density. (2) Free-fall accretion onto finite filaments can lead to the characteristic "fans" of infrared-dark clouds around star-forming regions. The fans may form due to tidal forces mostly arising at the ends of the filaments, consistent with numerical models and earlier analytical studies.
  • Observational evidence from local star-forming regions mandates that star formation occurs shortly after, or even during, molecular cloud formation. Models of the formation of molecular clouds in large-scale converging flows have identified the physical mechanisms driving the necessary rapid fragmentation. They also point to global gravitational collapse driving supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds. Previous cloud formation models have focused on turbulence generation, gravitational collapse, magnetic fields, and feedback. Here, we explore the effect of structure in the flow on the resulting clouds and the ensuing gravitational collapse. We compare two extreme cases, one with a collision between two smooth streams, and one with streams containing small clumps. We find that structured converging flows lead to a delay of local gravitational collapse ("star formation"). Thus, more gas has time to accumulate, eventually leading to a strong global collapse, and thus to a high star formation rate. Uniform converging flows fragment hydrodynamically early on, leading to the rapid onset of local gravitational collapse and an overall low sink formation rate.
  • Infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) are believed to be the birthplaces of rich clusters and thus contain the earliest phases of high-mass star formation. We use the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and Very Large Array (VLA) maps of ammonia (NH3) in six IRDCs to measure their column density and temperature structure (Paper 1), and here, we investigate the kinematic structure and energy content. We find that IRDCs overall display organized velocity fields, with only localized disruptions due to embedded star formation. The local effects seen in NH3 emission are not high velocity outflows but rather moderate (few km/s) increases in the line width that exhibit maxima near or coincident with the mid-infrared emission tracing protostars. These line width enhancements could be the result of infall or (hidden in NH3 emission) outflow. Not only is the kinetic energy content insufficient to support the IRDCs against collapse, but also the spatial energy distribution is inconsistent with a scenario of turbulent cloud support. We conclude that the velocity signatures of the IRDCs in our sample are due to active collapse and fragmentation, in some cases augmented by local feedback from stars.
  • Most young stars in nearby molecular clouds have estimated ages of 1-2 Myr, suggesting that star formation is rapid. However, small numbers of stars in these regions with inferred ages of >= 5-10 Myr have been cited to argue that star formation is instead a slow, quasi-static process. When considering these alternative pictures it is important to recognize that the age spread in a given star-forming cloud is necessarily an upper limit to the timescales of local collapse, as not all spatially-distinct regions will start contracting at precisely the same instant. Moreover, star-forming clouds may dynamically evolve on timescales of a few Myr; in particular, global gravitational contraction will tend to yield increasing star formation rates with time due to generally increasing local gas densities. We show that two different numerical simulations of dynamic, flow-driven molecular cloud formation and evolution 1) predict age spreads for the main stellar population roughly consistent with observations, and 2) raise the possibility of forming small numbers of stars early in cloud evolution, before global contraction concentrates the gas and the bulk of the stellar population is produced. In general, the existence of a small number of older stars among a generally much-younger population is consistent with the picture of dynamic star formation, and may even provide clues to the time evolution of star-forming clouds.
  • We present a study of dense molecular gas kinematics in seventeen nearby protostellar systems using single-dish and interferometric molecular line observations. The non-axisymmetric envelopes around a sample of Class 0/I protostars were mapped in the N2H+ (J=1-0) tracer with the IRAM 30m, CARMA and PdBI as well as NH3 (1,1) with the VLA. The molecular line emission is used to construct line-center velocity and linewidth maps for all sources to examine the kinematic structure in the envelopes on spatial scales from 0.1 pc to ~1000 AU. The direction of the large-scale velocity gradients from single-dish mapping is within 45 degrees of normal to the outflow axis in more than half the sample. Furthermore, the velocity gradients are often quite substantial, the average being ~2.3 km\s\pc. The interferometric data often reveal small-scale velocity structure, departing from the more gradual large-scale velocity gradients. In some cases, this likely indicates accelerating infall and/or rotational spin-up in the inner envelope; the median velocity gradient from the interferometric data is ~10.7 km/s/pc. In two systems, we detect high-velocity HCO+ (J=1-0) emission inside the highest-velocity \nthp\ emission. This enables us to study the infall and rotation close to the disk and estimate the central object masses. The velocity fields observed on large and small-scales are more complex than would be expected from rotation alone, suggesting that complex envelope structure enables other dynamical processes (i.e. infall) to affect the velocity field.
  • The fragmentation of shocked flows in a thermally bistable medium provides a natural mechanism to form turbulent cold clouds as precursors to molecular clouds. Yet because of the large density and temperature differences and the range of dynamical scales involved, following this process with numerical simulations is challenging. We compare two-dimensional simulations of flow-driven cloud formation without self-gravity, using the Lagrangian Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code VINE and the Eulerian grid code Proteus. Results are qualitatively similar for both methods, yet the variable spatial resolution of the SPH method leads to smaller fragments and thinner filaments, rendering the overall morphologies different. Thermal and hydro-dynamical instabilities lead to rapid cooling and fragmentation into cold clumps with temperatures below 300K. For clumps more massive than 1 Msun/pc, the clump mass function has an average slope of -0.8. The internal velocity dispersion of the clumps is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than their relative motion, rendering it subsonic with respect to the internal sound speed of the clumps, but supersonic as seen by an external observer. For the SPH simulations most of the cold gas resides at temperatures below 100K, while the grid-based models show an additional, substantial component between 100 and 300K. Independently of the numerical method our models confirm that converging flows of warm neutral gas fragment rapidly and form high-density, low-temperature clumps as possible seeds for star formation.
  • The expansion and collision of two wind-blown superbubbles is investigated numerically. Our models go beyond previous simulations of molecular cloud formation from converging gas flows by exploring this process with realistic flow parameters, sizes and timescales. The superbubbles are blown by time-dependent winds and supernova explosions, calculated from population synthesis models. They expand into a uniform or turbulent diffuse medium. We find that dense, cold gas clumps and filaments form naturally in the compressed collision zone of the two superbubbles. Their shapes resemble the elongated, irregular structure of observed cold, molecular gas filaments and clumps. At the end of the simulations, between 65 and 80 percent of the total gas mass in our simulation box is contained in these structures. The clumps are found in a variety of physical states, ranging from pressure equilibrium with the surrounding medium to highly under-pressured clumps with large irregular internal motions and structures which are rotationally supported.
  • Extinction maps at 8 micron from the Spitzer Space Telescope show that many Class 0 protostars exhibit complex, irregular, and on-axisymmetric structure within the densest regions of their dusty envelopes. Many of the systems have highly irregular and on-axisymmetric morphologies on scales $\sim$1000 AU, with a quarter of the sample exhibiting filamentary or flattened dense structures. Complex envelope structure is observed in regions spatially distinct from outflow cavities, and the densest structures often show no systematic alignment perpendicular to the cavities. We suggest that the observed envelope complexity is the result of collapse from protostellar cores with initially non-equilibrium structures. The striking non-axisymmetry in many envelopes could provide favorable conditions for the formation of binary systems. We then show that the kinematics around L1165 as probed with N2H+ are indicative of asymmetric infall; the velocity gradient is not perpendicular to the outflow.
  • We report a set of numerical experiments aimed at addressing the applicability of competitive accretion to explain the high-mass end of the stellar initial mass function in a sheet geometry with shallow gravitational potential, in contrast to most previous simulations which have assumed formation in a cluster gravitational potential. Our flat cloud geometry is motivated by models of molecular cloud formation due to large-scale flows in the interstellar medium. The experiments consisted of SPH simulations of gas accretion onto sink particles formed rapidly from Jeans-unstable dense clumps placed randomly in the finite sheet. These simplifications allow us to study accretion with a minimum of free parameters, and to develop better statistics on the resulting mass spectra. We considered both clumps of equal mass and gaussian distributions of masses, and either uniform or spatially-varying gas densities. In all cases, the sink mass function develops a power law tail at high masses, with $dN/dlog M \propto M^{-\Gamma}$. The accretion rates of individual sinks follow $\dot{M} \propto M^2$ at high masses; this results in a continual flattening of the slope of the mass function towards an asymptotic form $\Gamma \sim 1$ (where the Salpeter slope is $\Gamma = 1.35$). The asymptotic limit is most rapidly reached when starting from a relatively broad distribution of initial sink masses. In general the resulting upper mass slope is correlated with the maximum sink mass; higher sink masses are found in simulations with flatter upper mass slopes. Although these simulations are of a highly idealized situation, the results suggest that competitive accretion may be relevant in a wider variety of environments than previously considered, and in particular that the upper mass distribution may generally evolve towards a limiting value of $\Gamma \sim 1$.
  • The HII complex N159 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is used to study massive star formation in different environments, as it contains three giant molecular clouds (GMCs) that have similar sizes and masses but exhibit different intensities of star formation. We identify candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs) using infrared photometry, and model their SEDs to constrain mass and evolutionary state. Good fits are obtained for less evolved Type I, I/II, and II sources. Our analysis suggests that there are massive embedded YSOs in N159B, a maser source, and several ultracompact HII regions. Massive O-type YSOs are found in GMCs N159-E and N159-W, which are associated with ionized gas, i.e., where massive stars formed a few Myr ago. The third GMC, N159-S, has neither O-type YSOs nor evidence of previous massive star formation. This correlation between current and antecedent formation of massive stars suggests that energy feedback is relevant. We present evidence that N159-W is forming YSOs spontaneously, while collapse in N159-E may be triggered. Finally, we compare star formation rates determined from YSO counts with those from integrated H-alpha and 24 micron luminosities and expected from gas surface densities. Detailed dissection of extragalactic GMCs like the one presented here is key to revealing the physics underlying commonly used star formation scaling laws.
  • Given the importance of shear flows for astrophysical gas dynamics, we study the evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) analytically and numerically. We derive the dispersion relation for the two-dimensional KHI including viscous dissipation. The resulting expression for the growth rate is then used to estimate the intrinsic viscosity of four numerical schemes depending on code-specific as well as on physical parameters. Our set of numerical schemes includes the Tree-SPH code VINE, an alternative SPH formulation developed by Price (2008), and the finite-volume grid codes FLASH and PLUTO. In the first part, we explicitly demonstrate the effect of dissipation-inhibiting mechanisms such as the Balsara viscosity on the evolution of the KHI. With VINE, increasing density contrasts lead to a continuously increasing suppression of the KHI (with complete suppression from a contrast of 6:1 or higher). The alternative SPH formulation including an artificial thermal conductivity reproduces the analytically expected growth rates up to a density contrast of 10:1. The second part addresses the shear flow evolution with FLASH and PLUTO. Both codes result in a consistent non-viscous evolution (in the equal as well as in the different density case) in agreement with the analytical prediction. The viscous evolution studied with FLASH shows minor deviations from the analytical prediction.
  • We present Spitzer observations of a sample of 12 starless cores selected to have prominent 24 micron shadows. The Spitzer images show 8 and 24 micron shadows and in some cases 70 micron shadows; these spatially resolved absorption features trace the densest regions of the cores. We have carried out a 12CO (2-1) and 13CO (2-1) mapping survey of these cores with the Heinrich Hertz Telescope (HHT). We use the shadow features to derive optical depth maps. We derive molecular masses for the cores and the surrounding environment; we find that the 24 micron shadow masses are always greater than or equal to the molecular masses derived in the same region, a discrepancy likely caused by CO freeze--out onto dust grains. We combine this sample with two additional cores that we studied previously to bring the total sample to 14 cores. Using a simple Jeans mass criterion we find that ~ 2/3 of the cores selected to have prominent 24 micron shadows are collapsing or near collapse, a result that is supported by millimeter line observations. Of this subset at least half have indications of 70 micron shadows. All cores observed to produce absorption features at 70 micron are close to collapse. We conclude that 24 micron shadows, and even more so the 70 micron ones, are useful markers of cloud cores that are approaching collapse.
  • Recent models of molecular cloud formation and evolution suggest that such clouds are dynamic and generally exhibit gravitational collapse. We present a simple analytic model of global collapse onto a filament and compare this with our numerical simulations of the flow-driven formation of an isolated molecular cloud to illustrate the supersonic motions and infall ram pressures expected in models of gravity-driven cloud evolution. We apply our results to observations of the Pipe Nebula, an especially suitable object for our purposes as its low star formation activity implies insignifcant perturbations from stellar feedback. We show that our collapsing cloud model can explain the magnitude of the velocity dispersions seen in the $^{13}$CO filamentary structure by Onishi et al. and the ram pressures required by Lada et al. to confine the lower-mass cores in the Pipe nebula. We further conjecture that higher-resolution simulations will show small velocity dispersions in the densest core gas, as observed, but which are infall motions and not supporting turbulence. Our results point out the inevitability of ram pressures as boundary conditions for molecular cloud filaments, and the possibility that especially lower-mass cores still can be accreting mass at significant rates, as suggested by observations.
  • The formation of stars is a key process in astrophysics. Detailed knowledge of the physical mechanisms that govern stellar birth is a prerequisite for understanding the formation and evolution of our galactic home, the Milky Way. A theory of star formation is an essential part of any model for the origin of our solar system and of planets around other stars. Despite this pivotal importance, and despite many decades of research, our understanding of the processes that initiate and regulate star formation is still limited. Stars are born in cold interstellar clouds of molecular hydrogen gas. Star formation in these clouds is governed by the complex interplay between the gravitational attraction in the gas and agents such as turbulence, magnetic fields, radiation and thermal pressure that resist compression. The competition between these processes determines both the locations at which young stars form and how much mass they ultimately accrete. It plays out over many orders of magnitude in space and time, ranging from galactic to stellar scales. In addition, star formation is a highly stochastic process in which rare and hard-to-predict events, such as the formation of very massive stars and the resulting feedback, can play a dominant role in determining the evolution of a star-forming cloud. As a consequence of the wide range of scales and processes that control star formation, analytic models are usually restricted to highly idealized cases. These can yield insight, but the complexity of the problem means that they must be used in concert with large-scale numerical simulations. Here we summarize the state of modern star formation theory and review the recent advances in numerical simulation techniques.