• The H.E.S.S. Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope system is, due to its fast reaction time and its comparably low energy threshold, very well suited to perform follow-up observations of detections at other wavelengths or other messengers like high-energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. These advantages are utilized optimally via a fully automatized system reacting to alerts from various partner observatories covering various wavelengths and astrophysical messengers. In this contribution we'll provide an overview and present recent results from H.E.S.S. programs to follow up on multi-wavelength and multi-messenger alerts. To illustrate the capabilities of the system we present several real-time ToO observations searching for high-energy gamma-ray emission in coincidence with high-energy neutrinos detected by the IceCube and ANTARES neutrino telescopes and outline our program to search for gravitational wave counterparts.
  • The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the largest ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatories. The On-Site Analysis will be the first CTA scientific analysis of data acquired from the array of telescopes, in both northern and southern sites. The On-Site Analysis will have two pipelines: the Level-A pipeline (also known as Real-Time Analysis, RTA) and the level-B one. The RTA performs data quality monitoring and must be able to issue automated alerts on variable and transient astrophysical sources within 30 seconds from the last acquired Cherenkov event that contributes to the alert, with a sensitivity not worse than the one achieved by the final pipeline by more than a factor of 3. The Level-B Analysis has a better sensitivity (not be worse than the final one by a factor of 2) and the results should be available within 10 hours from the acquisition of the data: for this reason this analysis could be performed at the end of an observation or next morning. The latency (in particular for the RTA) and the sensitivity requirements are challenging because of the large data rate, a few GByte/s. The remote connection to the CTA candidate site with a rather limited network bandwidth makes the issue of the exported data size extremely critical and prevents any kind of processing in real-time of the data outside the site of the telescopes. For these reasons the analysis will be performed on-site with infrastructures co-located with the telescopes, with limited electrical power availability and with a reduced possibility of human intervention. This means, for example, that the on-site hardware infrastructure should have low-power consumption. A substantial effort towards the optimization of high-throughput computing service is envisioned to provide hardware and software solutions with high-throughput, low-power consumption at a low-cost.
  • Hadronic cross sections at ultra-high energy have a significant impact on the development of extensive air shower cascades. Therefore the interpretation of air shower data depends critically on hadronic interaction models that extrapolate the cross section from accelerator measurements to the highest cosmic ray energies. We discuss how extreme scenarios of cross section extrapolations can affect the interpretation of air shower data. We find that the theoretical uncertainty of the extrapolated proton-air cross section at ultra-high energies is much larger than suggested by the existing spread of available Monte Carlo model predictions. The impact on the depth of the shower maximum is demonstrated.
  • We study the dependence of extensive air shower development on the first hadronic interactions at ultra-high energies occurring in the startup phase of the air shower cascade. The interpretation of standard air shower observables depends on the characteristics of these interactions. Thus, it is currently difficult to draw firm conclusions for example on the primary cosmic ray mass composition from the analysis of air shower data. On the other hand, a known primary mass composition would allow us to study hadronic interactions at center of mass energies well above the range that is accessible to accelerators measurements.
  • The analysis of high-energy air shower data allows one to study the proton-air cross section at energies beyond the reach of fixed target and collider experiments. The mean depth of the first interaction point and its fluctuations are a measure of the proton-air particle production cross section. Since the first interaction point in air cannot be measured directly, various methods have been developed in the past to estimate the depth of the first interaction from air shower observables in combination with simulations. As the simulations depend on assumptions made for hadronic particle production at energies and phase space regions not accessible in accelerator experiments, the derived cross sections are subject to significant systematic uncertainties. The focus of this work is the development of an improved analysis technique that allows a significant reduction of the model dependence of the derived cross section at very high energy. Performing a detailed Monte Carlo study of the potential and the limitations of different measurement methods, we quantify the dependence of the measured cross section on the used hadronic interaction model. Based on these results, a general improvement to the analysis methods is proposed by introducing the actually derived cross section already in the simulation of reference showers. The reduction of the model dependence is demonstrated for one of the measurement methods.
  • In this paper, we will discuss the prospects of deducing the proton-air cross section from fluorescence telescope measurements of extensive air showers. As it is not possible to observe the point of first interaction $X_{\rm 1}$ directly, other observables closely linked to $X_{\rm 1}$ must be inferred from the longitudinal profiles. This introduces a dependence on the models used to describe the shower development. The most straightforward candidate for a good correlation to $X_{\rm 1}$ is the depth of shower maximum $X_{\rm max}$. We will discuss the sensitivity of an $X_{\rm max}$-based analysis on $\sigma_{\rm p-air}$ and quantify the systematic uncertainties arising from the model dependence, parameters of the reconstruction method itself and a possible non-proton contamination of the selected shower sample.