• Luminous high-redshift quasars can be used to probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the early universe because their UV light is absorbed by the neutral hydrogen along the line of sight. They help us to measure the neutral hydrogen fraction of the high-z universe, shedding light on the end of reionization epoch. In this paper, we present a discovery of a new quasar (PSO J006.1240+39.2219) at redshift $z=6.61\pm0.02$ from Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1. Including this quasar, there are nine quasars above $z>6.5$ up to date. The estimated continuum brightness is $M_\text{1450}$=$-25.96\pm0.08$. PSO J006.1240+39.2219 has a strong Ly~$\alpha$ emission compared with typical low-redshift quasars, but the measured near-zone region size is $R_\text{NZ}=3.2\pm1.1$ proper megaparsecs, which is consistent with other quasars at z$\sim$6.
  • NGC 253 hosts the nearest bar-fed nuclear starburst. Previous observations show a region rich in molecular gas, with dense clouds and clumps associated with recent star formation. We used ALMA to image the 350 GHz dust continuum and molecular line emission from this region at 2 pc resolution. Our observations reveal 14 bright, compact (~2-3 pc FWHM) knots of dust emission. We argue that most of these sources are likely to be forming super star clusters (SSCs) based on their inferred dynamical and gas masses, association with 36 GHz radio continuum emission, and coincidence with line emission tracing dense, excited gas. One source coincides with a known SSC, but the rest remain largely invisible in Hubble near-IR imaging. Our observations show the presence of dense, highly-excited gas in these objects and imply that gas still makes up a large fraction of their overall mass. The high brightness temperature of the sources even at 350 GHz implies a large optical depth near the peak of the infrared (IR) SED. This suggests that these sources may have large IR photospheres and that the IR radiation force likely exceeds L/c. Still, their moderate observed velocity dispersions suggest that feedback from radiation, winds, and supernovae are not yet disrupting most sources. Several lines of argument suggest that this mode of star formation may produce most of the stars in the burst. We argue for a scenario in which this phase lasts ~1 Myr, after which the clusters shed their natal cocoons but continue to produce ionizing photons and starlight. The strong feedback that drives the observed cold gas and X-ray outflows then likely occurs after the clusters emerge from this early phase.
  • We use new ALMA observations to investigate the connection between dense gas fraction, star formation rate, and local environment across the inner region of four local galaxies showing a wide range of molecular gas depletion times. We map HCN (1-0), HCO$^+$ (1-0), CS (2-1), $^{13}$CO (1-0), and C$^{18}$O (1-0) across the inner few kpc of each target. We combine these data with short spacing information from the IRAM large program EMPIRE, archival CO maps, tracers of stellar structure and recent star formation, and recent HCN surveys by Bigiel et al. and Usero et al. We test the degree to which changes in the dense gas fraction drive changes in the SFR. $I_{HCN}/I_{CO}$ (tracing the dense gas fraction) correlates strongly with $I_{CO}$ (tracing molecular gas surface density), stellar surface density, and dynamical equilibrium pressure, $P_{DE}$. Therefore, $I_{HCN}/I_{CO}$ becomes very low and HCN becomes very faint at large galactocentric radii, where ratios as low as $I_{HCN}/I_{CO} \sim 0.01$ become common. The apparent ability of dense gas to form stars, $\Sigma_{SFR}/\Sigma_{dense}$ (where $\Sigma_{dense}$ is traced by the HCN intensity and the star formation rate is traced by a combination of H$\alpha$ and 24$\mu$m emission), also depends on environment. $\Sigma_{SFR}/\Sigma_{dense}$ decreases in regions of high gas surface density, high stellar surface density, and high $P_{DE}$. Statistically, these correlations between environment and both $\Sigma_{SFR}/\Sigma_{dense}$ and $I_{HCN}/I_{CO}$ are stronger than that between apparent dense gas fraction ($I_{HCN}/I_{CO}$) and the apparent molecular gas star formation efficiency $\Sigma_{SFR}/\Sigma_{mol}$. We show that these results are not specific to HCN.
  • The low column density gas at the outskirts of galaxies as traced by the 21 cm hydrogen line emission (HI) represents the interface between galaxies and the intergalactic medium, i.e., where galaxies are believed to get their supply of gas to fuel future episodes of star formation. Photoionization models predict a break in the radial profiles of HI at a column density of 5x10E+19 cm^-2 due to the lack of self-shielding against extragalactic ionizing photons. To investigate the prevalence of such breaks in galactic disks and to characterize what determines the potential "edge" of the HI disks, we study the azimuthally-averaged HI column density profiles of 17 nearby galaxies from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) and supplemented in two cases with published Hydrogen Accretion in LOcal GAlaxieS (HALOGAS) data. To detect potential faint HI emission that would otherwise be undetected using conventional moment map analysis, we line up individual profiles to the same reference velocity and average them azimuthally to derive stacked radial profiles. To do so, we use model velocity fields created from a simple extrapolation of the rotation curves to align the profiles in velocity at radii beyond the extent probed with the sensitivity of traditional integrated HI maps. With this method, we improve our sensitivity to outer-disk HI emission by up to an order of magnitude. Except for a few disturbed galaxies, none show evidence for a sudden change in the slope of the HI radial profiles, the alleged signature of ionization by the extragalactic background.
  • Quasars (QSOs) hosting supermassive black holes are believed to reside in massive halos harboring galaxy overdensities. However, many observations revealed average or low galaxy densities around $z\gtrsim6$ QSOs. This could be partly because they measured galaxy densities in only tens of arcmin$^2$ around QSOs and might have overlooked potential larger scale galaxy overdensities. Some previous studies also observed only Lyman break galaxies (LBGs, massive older galaxies) and missed low mass young galaxies like Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) around QSOs. Here we present observations of LAE and LBG candidates in $\sim700$ arcmin$^2$ around a $z=6.61$ luminous QSO using Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam with narrow/broadbands. We compare their sky distributions, number densities and angular correlation functions with those of LAEs/LBGs detected in the same manner and comparable data quality in our control blank field. In the QSO field, LAEs and LBGs are clustering in 4-20 comoving Mpc angular scales, but LAEs show mostly underdensity over the field while LBGs are forming $30\times60$ comoving Mpc$^2$ large scale structure containing 3-$7\sigma$ high density clumps. The highest density clump includes a bright (23.78 mag in the narrowband) extended ($\gtrsim 16$ kpc) Ly$\alpha$ blob candidate, indicative of a dense environment. The QSO could be part of the structure but is not located exactly at any of the high density peaks. Near the QSO, LAEs show underdensity while LBGs average to $4\sigma$ excess densities compared to the control field. If these environments reflect halo mass, the QSO may not be in the most massive halo, but still in a moderately massive one.
  • During reionization, neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) imprints a damping wing absorption feature on the spectrum of high-redshift quasars. A detection of this signature provides compelling evidence for a significantly neutral Universe, and enables measurements of the hydrogen neutral fraction $x_{\rm HI}(z)$ at that epoch. Obtaining reliable quantitative constraints from this technique, however, is challenging due to stochasticity induced by the patchy inside-out topology of reionization, degeneracies with quasar lifetime, and the unknown unabsorbed quasar spectrum close to rest-frame Ly$\alpha$. We combine a large-volume semi-numerical simulation of reionization topology with 1D radiative transfer through high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the high-redshift Universe to construct models of quasar transmission spectra during reionization. Our state-of-the-art approach captures the distribution of damping wing strengths in biased quasar halos that should have reionized earlier, as well as the erosion of neutral gas in the quasar environment caused by its own ionizing radiation. Combining this detailed model with our new technique for predicting the quasar continuum and its associated uncertainty, we introduce a Bayesian statistical method to jointly constrain the neutral fraction of the Universe and the quasar lifetime from individual quasar spectra. We apply this methodology to the spectra of the two highest redshift quasars known, ULAS J1120+0641 and ULAS J1342+0928, and measured volume-averaged neutral fractions $\langle x_{\rm HI} \rangle(z=7.09)=0.48^{+0.26}_{-0.26}$ and $\langle x_{\rm HI} \rangle(z=7.54)=0.60^{+0.20}_{-0.23}$ (posterior medians and 68% credible intervals) when marginalized over quasar lifetimes of $10^3 \leq t_{\rm q} \leq 10^8$ years.
  • M82 is one of the best studied starburst galaxies in the local universe, and is consequently a benchmark for studying star formation feedback at both low and high redshift. We present new VLA HI observations that reveal the cold gas kinematics along the minor axis in unprecedented detail. This includes the detection of HI up to 10 kpc along the minor axis toward the South and beyond 5 kpc to the North. A surprising aspect of these observations is that the line-of-sight HI velocity decreases substantially from about 120 km/s to 50 km/s from 1.5 to 10 kpc off the midplane. The velocity profile is not consistent with the HI gas cooling from the hot wind. We demonstrate that the velocity decrease is substantially greater than the deceleration expected from gravitational forces alone. If the HI consists of a continuous population of cold clouds, some additional drag force must be present, and the magnitude of the drag force places a joint constraint on the ratio of the ambient medium to the typical cloud size and density. We also show that the HI kinematics are inconsistent with a simple conical outflow centered on the nucleus, but instead require the more widespread launch of the HI over the ~1 kpc extent of the starburst region. Regardless of the launch mechanism for the HI gas, the observed velocity decrease along the minor axis is sufficiently great that the HI may not escape the halo of M82. We estimate the HI outflow rate is much less than 1 M$_{\odot}$ per year at 10 kpc off the midplane.
  • Measuring the proximity effect and the damping wing of intergalactic neutral hydrogen in quasar spectra during the epoch of reionization requires an estimate of the intrinsic continuum at rest-frame wavelengths $\lambda_{\rm rest}\sim1200$-$1260$ {\AA}. In contrast to previous works which used composite spectra with matched spectral properties or explored correlations between parameters of broad emission lines, we opted for a non-parametric predictive approach based on principal component analysis (PCA) to predict the intrinsic spectrum from the spectral properties at redder (i.e. unabsorbed) wavelengths. We decomposed a sample of $12764$ spectra of $z\sim2$-$2.5$ quasars from SDSS/BOSS into 10 red-side ($1280$ {\AA} $<\lambda_{\rm rest}<2900$ {\AA}) and 6 blue-side ($1180$ {\AA} $<\lambda_{\rm rest}<1280$ {\AA}) PCA basis spectra, and constructed a projection matrix to predict the blue-side coefficients from a fit to the red-side spectrum. We found that our method predicts the blue-side continuum with $\sim6$-$12\%$ precision and $\lesssim1\%$ bias by testing on the full training set sample. We then computed predictions for the blue-side continua of the two quasars currently known at $z>7$: ULAS J1120+0641 ($z=7.09$) and ULAS J1342+0928 ($z=7.54$). Both of these quasars are known to exhibit extreme emission line properties, so we individually calibrated the precision of the continuum predictions from similar quasars in the training set. We find that both $z>7$ quasars, and in particular ULAS J1342+0928, show signs of damping wing-like absorption at wavelengths redward of Ly$\alpha$.
  • We present a survey of the [CII] 158 $\mu$m line and underlying far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission in a sample of 27 z>6 quasars using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at ~1" resolution. The [CII] line was significantly detected (at >5-sigma) in 23 sources (85%). We find typical line luminosities of $L_{\rm [CII]}=10^{9-10}$ L$_\odot$, and an average line width of ~385 km/s. The [CII]-to-far-infrared luminosity ratio ([CII]/FIR) in our sources span one order of magnitude, highlighting a variety of conditions in the star-forming medium. Four quasar host galaxies are clearly resolved in their [CII] emission on a few kpc scales. Basic estimates of the dynamical masses of the host galaxies give masses between $2\times10^{10}$ and $2\times10^{11}$ M$_\odot$, i.e., more than an order of magnitude below what is expected from local scaling relations, given the available limits on the masses of the central black holes ($>3\times10^8$ M$_\odot$, assuming Eddington-limited accretion). In stacked ALMA [CII] spectra of individual sources in our sample, we find no evidence of a deviation from a single Gaussian profile. The quasar luminosity does not strongly correlate with either the [CII] luminosity or equivalent width. This survey (with typical on-source integration times of 8 min) showcases the unparalleled sensitivity of ALMA at millimeter wavelengths, and offers a unique reference sample for the study of the first massive galaxies in the universe.
  • The Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center (SWAG) covers the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of the Milky Way at frequencies between 21.2 and 25.4 GHz obtained at the Australia Telescope Compact Array at $\sim 0.9$ pc spatial and $\sim 2.0$ km s$^{-1}$ spectral resolution. In this paper, we present data on the inner $\sim 250$ pc ($1.4^\circ$) between Sgr C and Sgr B2. We focus on the hyperfine structure of the metastable ammonia inversion lines (J,K) = (1,1) - (6,6) to derive column density, kinematics, opacity and kinetic gas temperature. In the CMZ molecular clouds, we find typical line widths of $8-16$ km s$^{-1}$ and extended regions of optically thick ($\tau > 1$) emission. Two components in kinetic temperature are detected at $25-50$ K and $60-100$ K, both being significantly hotter than dust temperatures throughout the CMZ. We discuss the physical state of the CMZ gas as traced by ammonia in the context of the orbital model by Kruijssen et al. (2015) that interprets the observed distribution as a stream of molecular clouds following an open eccentric orbit. This allows us to statistically investigate the time dependencies of gas temperature, column density and line width. We find heating rates between $\sim 50$ and $\sim 100$ K Myr$^{-1}$ along the stream orbit. No strong signs of time dependence are found for column density or line width. These quantities are likely dominated by cloud-to-cloud variations. Our results qualitatively match the predictions of the current model of tidal triggering of cloud collapse, orbital kinematics and the observation of an evolutionary sequence of increasing star formation activity with orbital phase.
  • We present an extremely deep CO(1-0) observation of a confirmed $z=1.62$ galaxy cluster. We detect two spectroscopically confirmed cluster members in CO(1-0) with $S/N>5$. Both galaxies have log(${\cal M_{\star}}$/\msol)$>11$ and are gas rich, with ${\cal M}_{\rm mol}$/(${\cal M_{\star}}+{\cal M}_{\rm mol}$)$\sim 0.17-0.45$. One of these galaxies lies on the star formation rate (SFR)-${\cal M_{\star}}$ sequence while the other lies an order of magnitude below. We compare the cluster galaxies to other SFR-selected galaxies with CO measurements and find that they have CO luminosities consistent with expectations given their infrared luminosities. We also find that they have comparable gas fractions and star formation efficiencies (SFE) to what is expected from published field galaxy scaling relations. The galaxies are compact in their stellar light distribution, at the extreme end for all high redshift star-forming galaxies. However, their SFE is consistent with other field galaxies at comparable compactness. This is similar to two other sources selected in a blind CO survey of the HDF-N. Despite living in a highly quenched proto-cluster core, the molecular gas properties of these two galaxies, one of which may be in the processes of quenching, appear entirely consistent with field scaling relations between the molecular gas content, stellar mass, star formation rate, and redshift. We speculate that these cluster galaxies cannot have any further substantive gas accretion if they are to become members of the dominant passive population in $z<1$ clusters.
  • We utilize the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to search for extended Lyman-Alpha emission around the z~6.6 QSO J0305-3150. After carefully subtracting the point-spread-function, we reach a nominal 5-sigma surface brightness limit of SB = 1.9x10$^{-18}$ erg/s/cm$^2$/arcsec$^2$ over a 1 arcsec$^2$ aperture, collapsing 5 wavelength slices centered at the expected location of the redshifted Lyman-Alpha emission (i.e. at 9256 Ang.). Current data suggest the presence (5-sigma, accounting for systematics) of a Lyman-Alpha nebula that extends for 9 kpc around the QSO. This emission is displaced and redshifted by 155 km/s with respect to the location of the QSO host galaxy traced by the [CII] emission line. The total luminosity is L = 3.0x10$^{42}$ erg/s. Our analysis suggests that this emission is unlikely to rise from optically thick clouds illuminated by the ionizing radiation of the QSO. It is more plausible that the Lyman-Alpha emission is due to fluorescence of the highly ionized optically thin gas. This scenario implies a high hydrogen volume density of n$_H$ ~ 6 cm$^{-3}$. In addition, we detect a Lyman-Alpha emitter (LAE) in the immediate vicinity of the QSO: i.e., with a projected separation of 12.5 kpc and a line-of-sight velocity difference of 560 km/s. The luminosity of the LAE is L = 2.1x10$^{42}$ erg/s and its inferred star-formation-rate is SFR ~ 1.3 M$_\odot$/yr. The probability of finding such a close LAE is one order of magnitude above the expectations based on the QSO-galaxy cross-correlation function. This discovery is in agreement with a scenario where dissipative interactions favour the rapid build-up of super-massive black holes at early Cosmic times.
  • We present detailed studies of a $z=2.12$ submillimeter galaxy, ALESS67.1, using sub-arcsecond resolution ALMA, AO-aided VLT/SINFONI, and HST/CANDELS data to investigate the kinematics and spatial distributions of dust emission (870 $\mu$m continuum), $^{12}$CO($J$=3-2), strong optical emission lines, and visible stars. Dynamical modelling of the optical emission lines suggests that ALESS67.1 is not a pure rotating disk but a merger, consistent with the apparent tidal features revealed in the HST imaging. Our sub-arcsecond resolution dataset allow us to measure half-light radii for all the tracers, and we find a factor of 4-6 smaller sizes in dust continuum compared to all the other tracers, including $^{12}$CO, and UV and H$\alpha$ emission is significantly offset from the dust continuum. The spatial mismatch between UV continuum and the cold dust and gas reservoir supports the explanation that geometrical effects are responsible for the offset of dusty galaxy on the IRX-$\beta$ diagram. Using a dynamical method we derive an $\alpha_{\rm CO}=1.8\pm1.0$, consistent with other SMGs that also have resolved CO and dust measurements. Assuming a single $\alpha_{\rm CO}$ value we also derive resolved gas and star-formation rate surface densities, and find that the core region of the galaxy ($\lesssim5$ kpc) follows the trend of mergers on the Schmidt-Kennicutt relationship, whereas the outskirts ($\gtrsim5$ kpc) lie on the locus of normal star-forming galaxies, suggesting different star-formation efficiencies within one galaxy. Our results caution against using single size or morphology for different tracers of the star-formation activity and gas content of galaxies, and therefore argue the need to use spatially-resolved, multi-wavelength observations to interpret the properties of SMGs, and perhaps even for $z>1$ galaxies in general.
  • We present interferometric CO observations made with the Combined Array for Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) of galaxies from the Extragalactic Database for Galaxy Evolution survey (EDGE). These galaxies are selected from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) sample, mapped with optical integral field spectroscopy. EDGE provides good quality CO data (3$\sigma$ sensitivity $\Sigma_{\rm mol}$ $\sim$ 11 M$_\odot$ pc$^{-2}$ before inclination correction, resolution $\sim1.4$ kpc) for 126 galaxies, constituting the largest interferometric CO survey of galaxies in the nearby universe. We describe the survey, the data characteristics, the data products, and present initial science results. We find that the exponential scale-lengths of the molecular, stellar, and star-forming disks are approximately equal, and galaxies that are more compact in molecular gas than in stars tend to show signs of interaction. We characterize the molecular to stellar ratio as a function of Hubble type and stellar mass, present preliminary results on the resolved relations between the molecular gas, stars, and star formation rate, and discuss the dependence of the resolved molecular depletion time on stellar surface density, nebular extinction, and gas metallicity. EDGE provides a key dataset to address outstanding topics regarding gas and its role in star formation and galaxy evolution, which will be publicly available on completion of the quality assessment.
  • We present ALMA band 3 observations of the CO(6-5), CO(7-6), and [CI] 369micron emission lines in three of the highest redshift quasar host galaxies at 6.6<z<6.9. These measurements constitute the highest-redshift CO detections to date. The target quasars have previously been detected in [CII] 158micron emission and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum. We detect (spatially unresolved, at a resolution of >2", or >14kpc) CO emission in all three quasar hosts. In two sources, we detect the continuum emission around 400micron (rest-frame), and in one source we detect [CI] at low significance. We derive molecular gas reservoirs of (1-3)x10^10 M_sun in the quasar hosts, i.e. approximately only 10 times the mass of their central supermassive black holes. The extrapolated [CII]-to-CO(1-0) luminosity ratio is 2500-4200, consistent with measurements in galaxies at lower redshift. The detection of the [CI] line in one quasar host galaxy and the limit on the [CI] emission in the other two hosts enables a first characterization of the physical properties of the interstellar medium in z~7 quasar hosts. In the sources, the derived global CO/[CII]/[CI] line ratios are consistent with expectations from photodissociation regions (PDR), but not X-ray dominated regions (XDR). This suggest that quantities derived from the molecular gas and dust emission are related to ongoing star-formation activity in the quasar hosts, providing further evidence that the quasar hosts studied here harbor intense starbursts in addition to their active nucleus.
  • We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the dust continuum and [C II] 158 $\mu$m fine structure line emission towards a far-infrared-luminous quasar, ULAS J131911.29$+$095051.4 at $z=6.13$, and combine the new Cycle 1 data with ALMA Cycle 0 data. The combined data have an angular resolution $\sim$ $0.3$, and resolve both the dust continuum and the [C II] line emission on few kpc scales. The [C II] line emission is more irregular than the dust continuum emission which suggests different distributions between the dust and [C II]-emitting gas. The combined data confirm the [C II] velocity gradient that we previously detected in lower resolution ALMA image from Cycle 0 data alone. We apply a tilted ring model to the [C II] velocity map to obtain a rotation curve, and constrain the circular velocity to be 427 $\pm$ 55 km s$^{-1}$ at a radius of 3.2 kpc with an inclination angle of 34$^\circ$. We measure the dynamical mass within the 3.2 kpc region to be 13.4$_{-5.3}^{+7.8}$ $\times 10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$. This yields a black hole and host galaxy mass ratio of 0.020$_{-0.007}^{+0.013}$, which is about 4$_{-2}^{+3}$ times higher than the present-day $M_{\rm BH}$/$M_{\rm bulge}$ ratio. This suggests that the supermassive black hole grows the bulk of its mass before the formation of the most of stellar mass in this quasar host galaxy in the early universe.
  • The existence of massive ($10^{11}$ solar masses) elliptical galaxies by redshift z~4 (when the Universe was 1.5 billion years old) necessitates the presence of galaxies with star-formation rates exceeding 100 solar masses per year at z>6 (corresponding to an age of the Universe of less than 1 billion years). Surveys have discovered hundreds of galaxies at these early cosmic epochs, but their star-formation rates are more than an order of magnitude lower. The only known galaxies with very high star-formation rates at z>6 are, with only one exception, the host galaxies of quasars, but these galaxies also host accreting supermassive (more than $10^9$ solar masses) black holes, which probably affect the properties of the galaxies. Here we report observations of an emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII] at a wavelength of 158 micrometres) in four galaxies at z>6 that are companions of quasars, with velocity offsets of less than 600 kilometers per second and linear offsets of less than 600 kiloparsecs. The discovery of these four galaxies was serendipitous; they are close to their companion quasars and appear bright in the far-infrared. On the basis of the [CII] measurements, we estimate star-formation rates in the companions of more than 100 solar masses per year. These sources are similar to the host galaxies of the quasars in [CII] brightness, linewidth and implied dynamical masses, but do not show evidence for accreting supermassive black holes. Similar systems have previously been found at lower redshift. We find such close companions in four out of twenty-five z>6 quasars surveyed, a fraction that needs to be accounted for in simulations. If they are representative of the bright end of the [CII] luminosity function, then they can account for the population of massive elliptical galaxies at z~4 in terms of cosmic space density.
  • We present spectroscopic redshifts of S(870)>2mJy submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) which have been identified from the ALMA follow-up observations of 870um detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (the ALMA-LESS survey). We derive spectroscopic redshifts for 52 SMGs, with a median of z=2.4+/-0.1. However, the distribution features a high redshift tail, with ~25% of the SMGs at z>3. Spectral diagnostics suggest that the SMGs are young starbursts, and the velocity offsets between the nebular emission and UV ISM absorption lines suggest that many are driving winds, with velocity offsets up to 2000km/s. Using the spectroscopic redshifts and the extensive UV-to-radio photometry in this field, we produce optimised spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Magphys, and use the SEDs to infer a median stellar mass of M*=(6+/-1)x10^{10}Msol for our SMGs with spectroscopic redshifts. By combining these stellar masses with the star-formation rates (measured from the far-infrared SEDs), we show that SMGs (on average) lie a factor ~5 above the main-sequence at z~2. We provide this library of 52 template fits with robust and well-sampled SEDs available as a resource for future studies of SMGs, and also release the spectroscopic catalog of ~2000 (mostly infrared-selected) galaxies targeted as part of the spectroscopic campaign.
  • We present ALMA observations of the [CII] fine structure line and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission in J1120+0641, the most distant quasar currently known (z=7.1). We also present observations targeting the CO(2-1), CO(7-6) and [CI] 369 micron lines in the same source obtained at the VLA and PdBI. We find a [CII] line flux of F_[CII]=1.11+/-0.10 Jy km/s and a continuum flux density of S_227GHz=0.53+/-0.04 mJy/beam, consistent with previous unresolved measurements. No other source is detected in continuum or [CII] emission in the field covered by ALMA (~25"). At the resolution of our ALMA observations (0.23", or 1.2 kpc, a factor ~70 smaller beam area compared to previous measurements), we find that the majority of the emission is very compact: a high fraction (~80%) of the total line and continuum flux is associated with a region 1-1.5 kpc in diameter. The remaining ~20% of the emission is distributed over a larger area with radius <4 kpc. The [CII] emission does not exhibit ordered motion on kpc-scales: applying the virial theorem yields an upper limit on the dynamical mass of the host galaxy of (4.3+/-0.9)x10^10 M_sun, only ~20x higher than the central black hole. The other targeted lines (CO(2-1), CO(7-6) and [CI]) are not detected, but the limits of the line ratios with respect to the [CII] emission imply that the heating in the quasar host is dominated by star formation, and not by the accreting black hole. The star-formation rate implied by the FIR continuum is 105-340 M_sun/yr, with a resulting star-formation rate surface density of ~100-350 M_sun/yr/kpc^2, well below the value for Eddington-accretion-limited star formation.
  • We present 90 mas (37 pc) resolution ALMA imaging of Arp 220 in the CO (1-0) line and continuum at $\lambda = 2.6$ mm. The internal gas distribution and kinematics of both galactic nuclei are well-resolved for the first time. In the West nucleus, the major gas and dust emission extends out to 0.2\arcsec radius (74 pc); the central resolution element shows a strong peak in the dust emission but a factor 3 dip in the CO line emission. In this nucleus, the dust is apparently optically thick ($\tau_{\rm 2.6mm} \sim1$) at $\lambda = 2.6$ mm with a dust brightness temperature $\sim147$ K. The column of ISM at this nucleus is $\rm N_{H2} \geq 2\times10^{26}$ cm$^{-2}$, corresponding to $\sim$900 gr cm$^{-2}$. The East nucleus is more elongated with radial extent 0.3\arcsec or $\sim111$ pc. The derived kinematics of the nuclear disks provide a good fit to the line profiles, yielding the emissivity distributions, the rotation curves and velocity dispersions. In the West nucleus, there is evidence of a central Keplerian component requiring a central mass of $8\times10^8$ \msun. The intrinsic widths of the emission lines are $\Delta \rm v (FWHM)$ = 250 (West) and 120 (East) \kms. Given the very short dissipation timescales for turbulence ($\lesssim10^5$ yrs), we suggest that the line widths may be due to semi-coherent motions within the nuclear disks. The symmetry of the nuclear disk structures is impressive -- implying the merger timescale is significantly longer than the rotation period of the disks.
  • We present a detailed study of a molecular outflow feature in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 using ALMA. We find that this feature is clearly associated with the edge of NGC 253's prominent ionized outflow, has a projected length of ~300 pc, with a width of ~50 pc and a velocity dispersion of ~40 km s^-1, consistent with an ejection from the disk about 1 Myr ago. The kinematics of the molecular gas in this feature can be interpreted (albeit not uniquely) as accelerating at a rate of 1 km s^-1 pc^-1. In this scenario, the gas is approaching escape velocity at the last measured point. Strikingly, bright tracers of dense molecular gas (HCN, CN, HCO+, CS) are also detected in the molecular outflow: We measure an HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) line ratio of ~1/10 in the outflow, similar to that in the central starburst region of NGC 253 and other starburst galaxies. By contrast, the HCN/CO line ratio in the NGC 253 disk is significantly lower (~1/30), similar to other nearby galaxy disks. This strongly suggests that the streamer gas originates from the starburst, and that its physical state does not change significantly over timescales of ~1 Myr during its entrainment in the outflow. Simple calculations indicate that radiation pressure is not the main mechanism for driving the outflow. The presence of such dense material in molecular outflows needs to be accounted for in simulations of galactic outflows.
  • We report Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission of the {\it z=6.326} quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter J0100+2802). J0100+2802 is, by far the most optically luminous, and radio-quiet quasar with the most massive black hole known at z>6. The VLBA observations have a synthesized beam size of 12.10 mas $\times$5.36 mas (FWHM), and detected the radio continuum emission from this object with a peak surface brightness of 64.6+/-9.0 micro-Jy/beam and a total flux density of 88+/-19 micro-Jy. The position of the radio peak is consistent with that from SDSS in the optical and Chandra in the X-ray. The radio source is marginally resolved by the VLBA observations. A 2-D Gaussian fit to the image constrains the source size to $\rm (7.1+/-3.5) mas x (3.1+/-1.7) mas. This corresponds to a physical scale of (40+/-20) pc x (18+/-10) pc. We estimate the intrinsic brightness temperature of the VLBA source to be T_{B}=(1.6 +/- 1.2) x 10^{7} K. This is significantly higher than the maximum value in normal star forming galaxies, indicating an AGN origin for the radio continuum emission. However, it is also significantly lower than the brightness temperatures found in highest redshift radio-loud quasars. J0100+2802 provides a unique example to study the radio activity in optically luminous and radio quiet active galactic nuclei in the early universe. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies will accurately measure the spectral index and address the dominant radiation mechanism of the radio emission.
  • We report new IRAM/PdBI, JCMT/SCUBA-2, and VLA observations of the ultraluminous quasar SDSSJ010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter, J0100+2802) at z=6.3, which hosts the most massive supermassive black hole (SMBH) of 1.24x10^10 Msun known at z>6. We detect the [C II] 158 $\mu$m fine structure line and molecular CO(6-5) line and continuum emission at 353 GHz, 260 GHz, and 3 GHz from this quasar. The CO(2-1) line and the underlying continuum at 32 GHz are also marginally detected. The [C II] and CO detections suggest active star formation and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxy. The redshift determined with the [C II] and CO lines shows a velocity offset of ~1000 km/s from that measured with the quasar Mg II line. The CO (2-1) line luminosity provides direct constraint on the molecular gas mass which is about (1.0+/-0.3)x10^10 Msun. We estimate the FIR luminosity to be (3.5+/-0.7)x10^12 Lsun, and the UV-to-FIR spectral energy distribution of J0100+2802 is consistent with the templates of the local optically luminous quasars. The derived [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratio of J0100+2802 is 0.0010+/-0.0002, which is slightly higher than the values of the most FIR luminous quasars at z~6. We investigate the constraint on the host galaxy dynamical mass of J0100+2802 based on the [C II] line spectrum. It is likely that this ultraluminous quasar lies above the local SMBH-galaxy mass relationship, unless we are viewing the system at a small inclination angle.
  • We present the ALMA survey of CO(2-1) emission from the 1/5 solar metallicity, Local Group dwarf galaxy NGC 6822. We achieve high (0.9 arcsec ~ 2 pc) spatial resolution while covering large area: four 250 pc x 250 pc regions that encompass ~2/3 of NGC 6822's star formation. In these regions, we resolve ~150 compact CO clumps that have small radii (~2-3 pc), narrow line width (~1 km/s), and low filling factor across the galaxy. This is consistent with other recent studies of low metallicity galaxies, but here shown with a 15 times larger sample. At parsec scales, CO emission correlates with 8 micron emission better than with 24 micron emission and anti-correlates with Halpha, so that PAH emission may be an effective tracer of molecular gas at low metallicity. The properties of the CO clumps resemble those of similar-size structures in Galactic clouds except of slightly lower surface brightness and CO-to-H2 ratio ~1-2 times the Galactic value. The clumps exist inside larger atomic-molecular complexes with masses typical for giant molecular cloud. Using dust to trace H2 for the entire complex, we find CO-to-H2 to be ~20-25 times the Galactic value, but with strong dependence on spatial scale and variations between complexes that may track their evolutionary state. The H2-to-HI ratio is low globally and only mildly above unity within the complexes. The SFR-to-H2 ratio is ~3-5 times higher in the complexes than in massive disk galaxies, but after accounting for the bias from targeting star-forming regions, we conclude that the global molecular gas depletion time may be as long as in massive disk galaxies.
  • We present final statistics from a survey for intervening MgII absorption towards 100 quasars with emission redshifts between $z=3.55$ and $z=7.08$. Using infrared spectra from Magellan/FIRE, we detect 279 cosmological MgII absorbers, and confirm that the incidence rate of $W_r>0.3 \AA$ MgII absorption per comoving path length does not evolve measurably between $z=0.25$ and $z=7$. This is consistent with our detection of seven new MgII systems at $z>6$, a redshift range that was not covered in prior searches. Restricting to relatively strong MgII systems ($W_r>1$\AA), there is significant evidence for redshift evolution. These systems roughly double in number density between $z=0$ and $z=2$-$3$, but decline by an order of magnitude from this peak by $z\sim 6$. This evolution mirrors that of the global star formation rate density, which could reflect a connection between star formation feedback and strong MgII absorbers. We compared our results to the Illustris cosmological simulation at $z=2$-$4$ by assigning absorption to catalogued dark-matter halos and by direct extraction of spectra from the simulation volume. To reproduce our results using the halo catalogs, we require circumgalactic (CGM) MgII envelopes within halos of progressively smaller mass at earlier times. This occurs naturally if we define the lower integration cutoff using SFR rather than mass. MgII profiles calculated directly from the Illustris volume yield far too few strong absorbers. We argue that this arises from unresolved phase space structure of CGM gas, particularly from turbulent velocities on sub-mesh scales. The presence of CGM MgII at $z>6$-- just $\sim 250$ Myr after the reionization redshift implied by Planck--suggests that enrichment of intra-halo gas may have begun before the presumed host galaxies' stellar populations were mature and dynamically relaxed. [abridged]